Eclipse GlassFish

Administration Guide

Release 7, DRAFT

Contributed 2018 - 2022

Eclipse GlassFish 7 Administration Guide provides instructions for configuring and administering Eclipse GlassFish.


Eclipse GlassFish Administration Guide, Release 7

Copyright © 2013, 2019 Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

This program and the accompanying materials are made available under the terms of the Eclipse Public License v. 2.0, which is available at http://www.eclipse.org/legal/epl-2.0.

SPDX-License-Identifier: EPL-2.0

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Preface

The Eclipse GlassFish Administration Guide provides instructions for configuring and administering Eclipse GlassFish.

This preface contains information about and conventions for the entire Eclipse GlassFish (Eclipse GlassFish) documentation set.

Eclipse GlassFish 7 is developed through the GlassFish project open-source community at https://github.com/eclipse-ee4j/glassfish. The GlassFish project provides a structured process for developing the Eclipse GlassFish platform that makes the new features of the Jakarta EE platform available faster, while maintaining the most important feature of Jakarta EE: compatibility. It enables Java developers to access the Eclipse GlassFish source code and to contribute to the development of the Eclipse GlassFish.

The following topics are addressed here:

Eclipse GlassFish Documentation Set

The Eclipse GlassFish documentation set describes deployment planning and system installation. For an introduction to Eclipse GlassFish, refer to the books in the order in which they are listed in the following table.

Book Title Description

Release Notes

Provides late-breaking information about the software and the documentation and includes a comprehensive, table-based summary of the supported hardware, operating system, Java Development Kit (JDK), and database drivers.

Quick Start Guide

Explains how to get started with the Eclipse GlassFish product.

Installation Guide

Explains how to install the software and its components.

Upgrade Guide

Explains how to upgrade to the latest version of Eclipse GlassFish. This guide also describes differences between adjacent product releases and configuration options that can result in incompatibility with the product specifications.

Deployment Planning Guide

Explains how to build a production deployment of Eclipse GlassFish that meets the requirements of your system and enterprise.

Administration Guide

Explains how to configure, monitor, and manage Eclipse GlassFish subsystems and components from the command line by using the asadmin(1M) utility. Instructions for performing these tasks from the Administration Console are provided in the Administration Console online help.

Security Guide

Provides instructions for configuring and administering Eclipse GlassFish security.

Application Deployment Guide

Explains how to assemble and deploy applications to the Eclipse GlassFish and provides information about deployment descriptors.

Application Development Guide

Explains how to create and implement Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Jakarta EE platform) applications that are intended to run on the Eclipse GlassFish. These applications follow the open Java standards model for Jakarta EE components and application programmer interfaces (APIs). This guide provides information about developer tools, security, and debugging.

Add-On Component Development Guide

Explains how to use published interfaces of Eclipse GlassFish to develop add-on components for Eclipse GlassFish. This document explains how to perform only those tasks that ensure that the add-on component is suitable for Eclipse GlassFish.

Embedded Server Guide

Explains how to run applications in embedded Eclipse GlassFish and to develop applications in which Eclipse GlassFish is embedded.

High Availability Administration Guide

Explains how to configure Eclipse GlassFish to provide higher availability and scalability through failover and load balancing.

Performance Tuning Guide

Explains how to optimize the performance of Eclipse GlassFish.

Troubleshooting Guide

Describes common problems that you might encounter when using Eclipse GlassFish and explains how to solve them.

Error Message Reference

Describes error messages that you might encounter when using Eclipse GlassFish.

Reference Manual

Provides reference information in man page format for Eclipse GlassFish administration commands, utility commands, and related concepts.

Message Queue Release Notes

Describes new features, compatibility issues, and existing bugs for Open Message Queue.

Message Queue Technical Overview

Provides an introduction to the technology, concepts, architecture, capabilities, and features of the Message Queue messaging service.

Message Queue Administration Guide

Explains how to set up and manage a Message Queue messaging system.

Message Queue Developer’s Guide for JMX Clients

Describes the application programming interface in Message Queue for programmatically configuring and monitoring Message Queue resources in conformance with the Java Management Extensions (JMX).

Message Queue Developer’s Guide for Java Clients

Provides information about concepts and procedures for developing Java messaging applications (Java clients) that work with Eclipse GlassFish.

Message Queue Developer’s Guide for C Clients

Provides programming and reference information for developers working with Message Queue who want to use the C language binding to the Message Queue messaging service to send, receive, and process Message Queue messages.

The following tutorials explain how to develop Jakarta EE applications:

  • Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Jakarta EE Platform. For beginning Jakarta EE programmers, this short tutorial explains the entire process for developing a simple enterprise application. The sample application is a web application that consists of a component that is based on the Enterprise JavaBeans specification, a JAX-RS web service, and a JavaServer Faces component for the web front end.

  • The Jakarta EE Tutorial. This comprehensive tutorial explains how to use Jakarta EE platform technologies and APIs to develop Jakarta EE applications.

Javadoc tool reference documentation for packages that are provided with Eclipse GlassFish is available as follows.

  • The Jakarta EE specifications and API specification is located at https://jakarta.ee/specifications/.

  • The API specification for Eclipse GlassFish 7, including Jakarta EE platform packages and nonplatform packages that are specific to the Eclipse GlassFish product, is located at https://glassfish.org/docs/.

For information about creating enterprise applications in the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment (IDE), see the NetBeans Documentation, Training & Support page.

For information about the Derby database for use with the Eclipse GlassFish, see the Derby page.

The Jakarta EE Samples project is a collection of sample applications that demonstrate a broad range of Jakarta EE technologies. The Jakarta EE Samples are bundled with the Jakarta EE Software Development Kit (SDK) and are also available from the repository (https://github.com/eclipse-ee4j/glassfish-samples).

Typographic Conventions

The following table describes the typographic changes that are used in this book.

Typeface Meaning Example

AaBbCc123

The names of commands, files, and directories, and onscreen computer output

Edit your .login file.

Use ls a to list all files.

machine_name% you have mail.

AaBbCc123

What you type, contrasted with onscreen computer output

machine_name% su

Password:

AaBbCc123

A placeholder to be replaced with a real name or value

The command to remove a file is rm filename.

AaBbCc123

Book titles, new terms, and terms to be emphasized (note that some emphasized items appear bold online)

Read Chapter 6 in the User’s Guide.

A cache is a copy that is stored locally.

Do not save the file.

Symbol Conventions

The following table explains symbols that might be used in this book.

Symbol Description Example Meaning

[ ]

Contains optional arguments and command options.

ls [-l]

The -l option is not required.

{ | }

Contains a set of choices for a required command option.

-d {y|n}

The -d option requires that you use either the y argument or the n argument.

${ }

Indicates a variable reference.

${com.sun.javaRoot}

References the value of the com.sun.javaRoot variable.

-

Joins simultaneous multiple keystrokes.

Control-A

Press the Control key while you press the A key.

+

Joins consecutive multiple keystrokes.

Ctrl+A+N

Press the Control key, release it, and then press the subsequent keys.

>

Indicates menu item selection in a graphical user interface.

File > New > Templates

From the File menu, choose New. From the New submenu, choose Templates.

Default Paths and File Names

The following table describes the default paths and file names that are used in this book.

Placeholder Description Default Value

as-install

Represents the base installation directory for Eclipse GlassFish. In configuration files, as-install is represented as follows: ${com.sun.aas.installRoot}

  • Installations on the Oracle Solaris operating system, Linux operating system, and Mac OS operating system:

    user’s-home-directory/glassfish7/glassfish

  • Installations on the Windows operating system:

    SystemDrive:\glassfish7\glassfish

as-install-parent

Represents the parent of the base installation directory for Eclipse GlassFish.

  • Installations on the Oracle Solaris operating system, Linux operating system, and Mac operating system:

    user’s-home-directory/glassfish7

  • Installations on the Windows operating system:

    SystemDrive:\glassfish7

domain-root-dir

Represents the directory in which a domain is created by default.

as-install/domains/

domain-dir

Represents the directory in which a domain’s configuration is stored. In configuration files, domain-dir is represented as follows: ${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}

domain-root-dir/domain-name

instance-dir

Represents the directory for a server instance.

domain-dir/instance-name

1 Overview of Eclipse GlassFish Administration

Eclipse GlassFish provides a server for developing and deploying Java Platform Enterprise Edition (Jakarta EE) applications and web Java Web Services.

As an administrator ofEclipse GlassFish, your main responsibilities are to establish a secure Eclipse GlassFish environment and to oversee the services, resources, and users that participate in that environment. Your key tasks include configuring resources and services, managing Eclipse GlassFish at runtime, and fixing problems that are associated with the server. You might also be involved in installing software, integrating add-on components, and deploying applications.

The following topics are addressed here:

Default Settings and Locations

After installation, you might need to perform some immediate configuration tasks to make your installation function as intended. If configuration defaults have been accepted, some features are enabled and some not. For an overview of initial configuration tasks for Eclipse GlassFish services and resources, see Initial Configuration Tasks.

In addition, you might want to reset default passwords, change names or locations of files, and so on. The following tables list the default administration values.

For the zip bundle of Eclipse GlassFish 7, the default administrator login is admin, with no password, which means that no login is required.

Table 1-1 Default Administration Values

Item Default

Domain Name

domain1

Master Password

changeit

Administration User

admin

Administration Server Port

4848

HTTP Port

8080

HTTPS Port

8181

Pure JMX Clients Port

8686

Message Queue Port

7676

IIOP Port

3700

IIOP/SSL Port

3820

IIOP/SSL Port With Mutual Authentication

3920

Table 1-2 Default Locations

Item Default

Command-line Utility (asadmin)

as-install/bin

Configuration Files

domain-dir/config

Log Files

domain-dir/logs

Upgrade Tool (asupgrade Command)

as-install/bin

For information about replaceable items and default paths and files, see Default Paths and File Names.

Configuration Tasks

Some configuration tasks must be performed directly after installation for your Eclipse GlassFish environment to work as intended. For example, if you are using a database with Eclipse GlassFish, you need to set up database connectivity right away.

Some configuration situations are ongoing and will require you to make changes many times during the life of your installation. You can use either the Administration Console or the asadmin utility to modify the configuration. Changes are automatically applied to the appropriate configuration file.

The following topics are addressed here:

Initial Configuration Tasks

This section maps the common configuration tasks to the command-line procedures in this guide. In some situations, the resource or service is automatically enabled and your configuration tasks involve adjusting or changing the default settings to suit your specific needs.

The following resources and services frequently require configuration immediately after installation:

System Properties

See Administering System Properties.

Domains

The initial domain1 is created during installation. Additional configuration tasks might include such tasks as configuring additional domains or setting up automatic restart. See Administering Domains.

JVM

The initial tasks for configuring the JVM include creating JVM options and profilers. See Administering the Virtual Machine for the Java Platform.

Logging

By default, logging is enabled, so basic logging works without additional configuration. However, you might want to change log levels, property values, or the location of log files. See Administering the Logging Service.

Monitoring

By default, the monitoring service is enabled. However, monitoring for the individual modules is not enabled, so your first monitoring task is to enable monitoring for the modules that you want to monitor. See Administering the Monitoring Service.

Life Cycle Modules

See Administering Life Cycle Modules.

Security
  • System Security. Initial configuration tasks might include setting up passwords, audit modules, and certificates. See "Administering System Security" in Eclipse GlassFish Security Guide.

  • User Security. Initial configuration tasks might include creating authentication realms and file users. See "Administering User Security" in Eclipse GlassFish Security Guide.

  • Message Security. Initial configuration tasks might include configuring a Java Cryptography Extension (JCE) provider, enabling default and non-default security providers, and configuring message protection policies. See "Administering Message Security" in Eclipse GlassFish Security Guide.

Database Connectivity

The initial tasks involved in configuring Eclipse GlassFish to connect to the Apache Derby database include creating a Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) connection pool, creating a JDBC resource, and integrating a JDBC driver. See Administering Database Connectivity.

EIS Connectivity

The initial tasks involved in configuring Eclipse GlassFish to connect to an enterprise information system (EIS) include creating a connector connection pool, creating a connector resource, editing a resource adapter configuration, creating a connector security map, creating a connector work security map, and creating an administered object (if needed). See Administering EIS Connectivity.

Internet Connectivity

The initial tasks involved in making deployed web applications accessible by internet clients include creating HTTP network listeners and virtual servers, and configuring the HTTP listeners for SSL (if needed). See Administering Internet Connectivity.

Object Request Broker (ORB)

An initial configuration task might involve creating an IIOP listener. See Administering the Object Request Broker (ORB).

JavaMail Service

An initial configuration task might involve creating a JavaMail resource. See Administering the JavaMail Service.

Java Message Service (JMS)

Initial configuration tasks might include creating a physical destination, creating connection factories or destination resources, creating a JMS host (if the default JMS host is not adequate), adjusting connection pool settings (if needed), and configuring resource adapters for JMS. See Administering the Java Message Service (JMS).

JNDI Service

An initial configuration task might involve creating a JNDI resource. See Administering the Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) Service.

Information and instructions for accomplishing the tasks by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

How Dotted Names Work for Configuration

After the initial configuration is working, you will continue to manage ongoing configuration for the life of your Eclipse GlassFish installation. You might need to adjust resources to improve productivity, or issues might arise that require settings to be modified or defaults to be reset. In some situations, an asadmin subcommand is provided for updating, such as the update-connector-work-security-map subcommand. However, most updating is done by using the list, get, and set subcommands with dotted names. For detailed information about dotted names, see the dotted-names(5ASC) help page.

Dotted names also apply to monitoring, but the method is different. For information on using dotted names for monitoring, see How the Monitoring Tree Structure Works.

The general process for working with configuration changes on the command line is as follows:

  1. List the modules for the component of interest.

    The following single mode example uses the | (pipe) character and the grep command to narrow the search:

    asadmin list "*" | grep http | grep listener

    Information similar to the following is returned:

    configs.config.server-config.network-config.network-listeners.network-listener.http-listener-1
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.network-listeners.network-listener.http-listener-2
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.admin-listener.http
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.admin-listener.http.file-cache
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.http-listener-1
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.http-listener-1.http
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.http-listener-1.http.file-cache
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.http-listener-2
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.http-listener-2.http
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.http-listener-2.http.file-cache
    configs.config.server-config.network-config.protocols.protocol.http-listener-2.ssl
  2. Get the attributes that apply to the module you are interested in.

    The following multimode example gets the attributes and values for http-listener-1:

    asadmin> get server-config.network-config.network-listeners.network-listener.http-listener-1.*

    Information similar to the following is returned:

    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.acceptor-threads = 1
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.address = 0.0.0.0
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.blocking-enabled = false
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.default-virtual-server = server
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.enabled = true
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.external-port =
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.family = inet
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.id = http-listener-1
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.port = 8080
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.redirect-port =
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.security-enabled = false
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.server-name =
    server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.xpowered-by = true
  3. Modify an attribute by using the set subcommand.

    This example sets the security-enabled attribute of http-listener-1 to true:

    asadmin> set server.http-service.http-listener.http-listener-1.security-enabled = true

Configuration Files

The bulk of the configuration information about Eclipse GlassFish resources, applications, and instances is stored in the domain.xml configuration file. This file is the central repository for a given administrative domain and contains an XML representation of the Eclipse GlassFish domain model. The default location for the domain.xml file is domain-dir/config.

Eclipse GlassFish maintains a backup of the domain.xml file that is named domain.xml.bak. The purpose of this file is solely to enable Eclipse GlassFish to start a domain if the domain.xml file cannot be read. Do not modify or delete the domain.xml.bak file and do not use this file for any other purpose.

The logging.properties file is used to configure the Java Util Logging system. The default logging.properties file is located in the same directory as the domain.xml file. For further information on the logging.properties file, see Logging Properties.

The asenv.conf file is located in the as-install/config directory. Its purpose is to store the Eclipse GlassFish environment variables, such as the installation location of the database, Message Queue, and so on.

Changes are automatically applied to the appropriate configuration file. Do not edit the configuration files directly. Manual editing is prone to error and can have unexpected results.

Impact of Configuration Changes

Some configuration changes require that you restart the DAS or Eclipse GlassFish instances for the changes to take effect. Other changes are applied dynamically without requiring that the DAS or instances be restarted. The procedures in this guide indicate when a restart is required. Eclipse GlassFish enables you to determine whether the DAS or an instance must be restarted to apply configuration changes.

Some changes to resources or connection pools affect the applications that use the resources or connection pools. These changes do not require restart. However, any applications that use the resources or connection pools must be disabled and re-enabled or redeployed for the change to take effect.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Determine Whether the DAS or an Instance Requires Restart
  1. Ensure that the DAS is running. To obtain information about the DAS or an instance, a running server is required.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • To determine if the DAS requires restart, list the domains in your Eclipse GlassFish installation. Use the list-domains subcommand for this purpose.

      asadmin> list-domains [--domaindir domain-root-dir]

      The domain-root-dir is the directory that contains the directories in which individual domains' configuration is stored. The default is as-install/domains, where as-install is the base installation directory of the Eclipse GlassFish software. If the DAS requires restart, a statement that restart is required is displayed.

    • To determine if an instance requires restart, list information about the instance. Use the list-instances subcommand for this purpose.

      asadmin> list-instances instance-name

      The instance-name is the name of the instance for which you are listing information. If the instance requires restart, one of the following pieces of information is displayed: a statement that restart is required, or a list of configuration changes that are not yet applied to the instance.

Example 1-1 Determining if the DAS Requires Restart

This example determines that the DAS for the domain domain1 requires restart to apply configuration changes.

asadmin> list-domains
domain1 running, restart required to apply configuration changes
Command list-domains executed successfully.

Example 1-2 Determining if an Instance Requires Restart

This example determines that the instance pmd-i1 requires restart to apply configuration changes.

asadmin> list-instances pmd-i1
pmd-i1   running;  requires restart
Command list-instances executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommands by typing the following commands at the command line.

  • asadmin help list-domains

  • asadmin help list-instances

Configuration Changes That Require Restart

The following configuration changes require restart for the changes to take effect:

  • Changing JVM options

  • Changing port numbers

    Changes to some port numbers, for example HTTP listener ports, do not require restart.

  • Changing log handler elements

  • Configuring certificates

  • Managing HTTP, JMS, IIOP, JNDI services

  • Enabling or disabling secure administration as explained in "Running Secure Admin" in Eclipse GlassFish Security Guide

Dynamic Configuration Changes

With dynamic configuration, changes take effect while the DAS or instance is running. The following configuration changes do not require restart:

  • Adding or deleting add-on components

  • Adding or removing JDBC, JMS, and connector resources and pools (Exception: Some connection pool properties affect applications.)

  • Changing a system property that is not referenced by a JVM option or a port

  • Adding file realm users

  • Changing logging levels

  • Enabling and disabling monitoring

  • Changing monitoring levels for modules

  • Enabling and disabling resources and applications

  • Deploying, undeploying, and redeploying applications

Changes That Affect Applications

Some changes to resources or connection pools affect the applications that use the resources or connection pools. These changes do not require restart. However, any applications that use the resources or connection pools must be disabled and re-enabled or redeployed for the change to take effect.

If you do not know which applications use the changed resources or connection pools, you can apply these changes by restarting the clusters orEclipse GlassFish instances to which applications are deployed. However, to minimize the disruption to the services that your applications provide, avoid restarting clusters or instances to apply these changes if possible.

The following changes affect applications:

  • Creating or deleting resources (Exception: Changes to some JDBC, JMS, or connector resources do not affect applications.)

  • Modifying the following JDBC connection pool properties:

    • datasource-classname

    • associate-with-thread

    • lazy-connection-association

    • lazy-connection-enlistment

    • JDBC driver vendor-specific properties

  • Modifying the following connector connection pool properties:

    • resource-adapter-name

    • connection-definition-name

    • transaction-support

    • associate-with-thread

    • lazy-connection-association

    • lazy-connection-enlistment

    • Vendor-specific properties

Administration Tools

For the most part, you can perform the same tasks by using either the graphical Administration Console or the asadmin command-line utility, however, there are exceptions.

The following Eclipse GlassFish administration tools are described here:

Administration Console

The Administration Console is a browser-based utility that features an easy-to-navigate graphical interface that includes extensive online help for the administrative tasks.

To use the Administration Console, the domain administration server (DAS) must be running. Each domain has its own DAS, which has a unique port number. When Eclipse GlassFish was installed, you chose a port number for the DAS, or used the default port of 4848. You also specified a user name and password if you did not accept the default login (admin with no password).

When specifying the URL for the Administration Console, use the port number for the domain to be administered. The format for starting the Administration Console in a web browser is http://`hostname:`port. For example:

http://kindness.example.com:4848

If the Administration Console is running on the host where Eclipse GlassFish was installed, specify localhost for the host name. For example:

http://localhost:4848

If the Administration Console is run on a host different from the host where Eclipse GlassFish was installed, a secure connection (https instead of http) is used. Some browsers do not display pages on secure connections by default and must be configured to permit secure protocols (SSL and TLS).

For Microsoft Windows, an alternate way to start the Eclipse GlassFish Administration Console is by using the Start menu.

You can display the help material for a page in the Administration Console by clicking the Help button on the page. The initial help page describes the functions and fields of the page itself. Associated task instructions can be accessed on additional pages by clicking a link in the See Also list.

If you try to use the Administration Console from a system through a proxy server on another system back to the original system, while using the system’s full host name (instead of localhost or 127.0.0.1) you are denied access because the request is treated as a remote request, which requires that the secure administration feature (secure admin) be enabled.

To avoid this situation, do one of the following:

  • Do not use a proxy server.

  • Use localhost or 127.0.0.1 as the host name.

  • Enable secure admin so that what Eclipse GlassFish interprets as a remote request is accepted as such.

To enable secure admin, see "oManaging Administrative Security" in Eclipse GlassFish Security Guide.

asadmin Utility

The asadmin utility is a command-line tool that runs subcommands for identifying the operation or task that you want to perform. You can run asadmin subcommands either from a command prompt or from a script. Running asadmin subcommands from a script is helpful for automating repetitive tasks. Basic information about how the asadmin utility works can be found in the asadmin(1M) help page. For instructions on using the asadmin utility, see Using the asadmin Utility.

To issue an asadmin subcommand in the standard command shell (single mode), go to the as-install/bin directory and type the asadmin command followed by a subcommand. For example:

asadmin list-jdbc-resources

You can invoke multiple command mode (multimode) by typing asadmin at the command prompt, after which the asadmin> prompt is presented. The asadmin utility continues to accept subcommands until you exit multimode and return to the standard command shell. For example:

asadmin> list-jdbc-resources

You can display a help page for any asadmin subcommand by typing help before the subcommand name. For example:

asadmin> help restart-domain

or

asadmin help restart-domain

A collection of the asadmin help pages is available in HTML and PDF format in the Eclipse GlassFish Reference Manual.

REST Interfaces

Eclipse GlassFish provides representational state transfer (REST) interfaces to enable you to access monitoring and configuration data for Eclipse GlassFish, including data that is provided by newly installed add-on components. For more information, see Using REST Interfaces to Administer Eclipse GlassFish.

OSGi Module Management Subsystem

The OSGi module management subsystem that is provided with Eclipse GlassFish is the Apache Felix OSGi framework . To administer this framework, use the either of the following tools:

  • Apache Felix Gogo remote shell. This shell is provided with Eclipse GlassFish. The shell uses the Felix Gogo shell service to interact with the OSGi module management subsystem.

  • GlassFish OSGi Administration Console. This console is distributed as an add-on component for Eclipse GlassFish or as a set of files from the Maven GlassFish repository. In both distributions, the GlassFish OSGi Web Console is provided as an extension to the Administration Console and as a standalone web application. The GlassFish OSGi Administration Console is a customized version of the Apache Felix Web Console.

These tools enable you to perform administrative tasks on OSGi bundles such as:

  • Browsing installed OSGi bundles

  • Viewing the headers of installed OSGi bundles

  • Installing OSGi bundles

  • Controlling the life cycle of installed bundles

To Enable the Apache Felix Gogo Remote Shell

By default, the Apache Felix Gogo remote shell in Eclipse GlassFish is disabled. Before using the shell to administer OSGi bundles in Eclipse GlassFish, you must enable the shell.

Enabling the Apache Felix Gogo remote shell in Eclipse GlassFish involves changing the value of the property glassfish.osgi.start.level.final. This property controls whether the OSGi start level service enables the shell when the DAS or a Eclipse GlassFish instance is started.

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running.

  2. Change the value of the glassfish.osgi.start.level.final property from 2 to 3. If the domain includes clustered or standalone instances on remote hosts, perform this step on each remote host. You can change this value either by creating a Java system property or by editing a file.

    • To change this value by creating a Java system property, create the Java system property glassfish.osgi.start.level.final with a value of 3.

      asadmin> create-jvm-options --target target -Dglassfish.osgi.start.level.final=3
      target

      The target for which you are creating the property.

      For the DAS, the target is `server`.
        For a clustered or standalone instance, the target is the name of the
        instance.
      * To change this value by editing a file, edit the plain-text file
      as-install``/config/osgi.properties`` to change the value of the
      `glassfish.osgi.start.level.final` property from 2 to 3.
  3. Restart the DAS. For instructions, see To Restart a Domain.

To Run Apache Felix Gogo Remote Shell Commands

The Apache Felix Gogo remote shell is integrated with the Eclipse GlassFish asadmin command line utility. You can use the asadmin subcommands osgi and osgi-shell to access the remote shell and run OSGi shell commands.

To Run Remote Shell Commands Using the osgi Subcommand

The osgi subcommand delegates the command line to the Apache Felix Gogo remote shell for the execution of OSGi shell commands. Commands are executed by the remote shell and results are returned by the asadmin utility. The osgi subcommand is supported in remote mode only.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote commands require a running server.

  2. Access the remote shell by using the osgi subcommand. For the full syntax and options for this subcommand, see osgi(1).

To Run Remote Shell Commands Using the osgi-shell Subcommand

The osgi-shell subcommand provides interactive access to the Apache Felix Gogo remote shell for the execution of OSGi shell commands. OSGi shell commands are executed on the server and results are printed on the client. You can run multiple commands from a file or run commands interactively. The osgi-shell subcommand is supported in local mode only. Unlike other local subcommands, however, the DAS and the server instance whose shell is being accessed must be running.

  1. Ensure that the server is running.

  2. Access the remote shell by using the osgi-shell subcommand. For the full syntax and options for this subcommand, see osgi-shell(1).

Example 1-3 Listing Apache Felix Gogo Remote Shell Commands

This example lists Apache Felix Gogo remote shell commands. Some lines of output are omitted from this example for readability.

asadmin> osgi help
felix:bundlelevel
felix:cd
felix:frameworklevel
gogo:cat
gogo:each
gogo:echo
...
asadmin> osgi-shell
Use "exit" to exit and "help" for online help.
gogo$ help
felix:bundlelevel
felix:cd
felix:frameworklevel
gogo:cat
gogo:each
gogo:echo

Example 1-4 Running a Remote Shell Command

This example runs the Felix Remote Shell Command lb without any arguments to list all installed OSGi bundles. Some lines of output are omitted from this example for readability.

asadmin> osgi lb
START LEVEL 2
ID|State      |Level|Name
 0|Active     |    0|System Bundle
 1|Active     |    1|Metro Web Services API OSGi Bundle
 2|Active     |    1|jakarta.annotation API
Command osgi executed successfully.
...
asadmin> osgi-shell
Use "exit" to exit and "help" for online help.
gogo$ lb
START LEVEL 2
ID|State      |Level|Name
 0|Active     |    0|System Bundle
 1|Active     |    1|Metro Web Services API OSGi Bundle
 2|Active     |    1|jakarta.annotation API
gogo$

Example 1-5 Determining the Services That an OSGi Bundle Provides

This example runs the Felix Remote Shell Command inspect with the service option and the capability option to determine the services that OSGi bundle 251 provides. Some lines of output are omitted from this example for readability.

asadmin> osgi inspect service capability 251
== GlassFish EJB Container for OSGi Enabled EJB Applications (251) provides services:
objectClass = org.glassfish.osgijavaeebase.Extender
service.id = 68
-----
objectClass = org.glassfish.osgijavaeebase.OSGiDeployer
service.id = 69
service.ranking = -2147483648
Command osgi executed successfully.
...
asadmin> osgi -shell
Use "exit" to exit and "help" for online help.
gogo$ inspect service capability 251
== GlassFish EJB Container for OSGi Enabled EJB Applications (251) provides services:
objectClass = org.glassfish.osgijavaeebase.Extender
service.id = 68
...
gogo$
To Download and Install the GlassFish OSGi Web Console

The GlassFish OSGi Web Console is distributed as follows:

In both distributions, the GlassFish OSGi Web Console is provided as an extension to the Administration Console and as a standalone web application.

  1. Perform one of the following sets of steps, depending on how you are obtaining the GlassFish OSGi Web Console.

    • If you are obtaining the console as an add-on component, install the GlassFish OSGi Admin Console component.

    • If you are obtaining the console from the Maven repository, download and unzip the required files.

  2. Download the following files to the parent of the glassfish7 directory of your Eclipse GlassFish installation. glassfish-osgi-http-3.1.2.zip

  3. Unzip the files that you downloaded.

    The contents of the files are added to the as-install/modules/autostart directory of your Eclipse GlassFish installation.

  4. Restart the DAS. For instructions, see To Restart a Domain.

Next Steps

After downloading and installing the GlassFish OSGi Web Console, you can access the console as explained in the following sections:

To Access the GlassFish OSGi Web Console Through the Eclipse GlassFish Administration Console

A tab for the GlassFish OSGi Web Console is provided for the DAS and for every Eclipse GlassFish instance in a domain.

  1. Ensure that the DAS and the instance for which you want to access the GlassFish OSGi Web Console are running.

  2. Start the Eclipse GlassFish Administration Console. For instructions, see Administration Console.

  3. Open the Administration Console page for the DAS or instance for which you are accessing the GlassFish OSGi Web Console.

    • For the DAS, in the navigation tree, select the server (Admin Server) node.

    • For a standalone instance, perform these steps:

      1. In the navigation tree, expand the Standalone Instances node.

      2. Under the Standalone Instances node, select the instance.

    • For a clustered instance, perform these steps:

      1. In the navigation tree, expand the Clusters node.

      2. Under the Clusters node, select the cluster that contains the instance. The General Information page for the cluster opens.

      3. In the General Information page for the cluster, click the Instances tab. The Clustered Server Instances page for the cluster opens.

      4. In the Server Instances table on the Clustered Server Instances page, select the instance.

  4. On the Administration Console page for the DAS or instance, click the OSGi Console tab. You are prompted for the user name and password of the administrative user of the GlassFish OSGi Web Console.

  5. In response to the prompt, provide the user name and password of the administrative user of the GlassFish OSGi Web Console. The user name and password of this user are both preset to admin. The GlassFish OSGi Web Console page opens.

To Access the GlassFish OSGi Web Console as a Standalone Web Application
  1. Ensure that the DAS or the instance for which you want to access the GlassFish OSGi Web Console is running.

  2. In a web browser, open the following location:

    http://host:http-port/osgi/system/console/
    host

    The host where the DAS or instance is running.

    http-port

    The port on which Eclipse GlassFish listens for HTTP requests. The default is 8080.

    For example, if the DAS is running on the local host and Eclipse GlassFish listens for HTTP requests on the default port, open the following location:

    +

    http://localhost:8080/osgi/system/console/
  3. When prompted, provide the user name and password of the administrative user of the GlassFish OSGi Web Console.

    The user name and password of this user are both preset to admin.

keytool Utility

The keytool utility is used to set up and work with Java Security Socket Extension (JSSE) digital certificates. See "Administering JSSE Certificates" in Eclipse GlassFish Security Guide for instructions on using keytool.

Java Monitoring and Management Console (JConsole)

Java SE provides tools to connect to an MBean server and view the MBeans that are registered with the server. JConsole is one such popular JMX Connector Client and is available as part of the standard Java SE distribution. For instructions on implementing JConsole in the Eclipse GlassFish environment, see Configuring JConsole to View Eclipse GlassFish Monitoring Data.

Instructions for Administering Eclipse GlassFish

Information and instructions on performing most of the administration tasks from the command line are provided in this document and in the asadmin utility help pages. For instructions on accessing asadmin online help, see To Display Help Information for the asadmin Utility or a Subcommand.

Information and instructions for accomplishing the tasks by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

Instructions written for the Eclipse GlassFish tools use standard UNIX forward slashes (/) for directory path separators in commands and file names. If you are running Eclipse GlassFish on a Microsoft Windows system, use backslashes (\) instead. For example:

  • UNIX: as-install/bin/asadmin

  • Windows: as-install\bin\asadmin

The following additional documents address specific administration areas:

Part I

Runtime Administration

2 General Administration

This chapter provides instructions for performing general administration tasks in the Eclipse GlassFish 7 environment by using the asadmin command-line utility.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing the tasks in this chapter by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

Using the asadmin Utility

Use the asadmin utility to perform administrative tasks for Eclipse GlassFish from the command line or from a script. You can use this utility instead of the Administration Console interface.

The following topics are addressed here:

Path to the asadmin Utility

The asadmin utility is located in the as-install/bin directory. To run the asadmin utility without specifying the path, ensure that this directory is in your path.

asadmin Utility Syntax

The syntax for running the asadmin utility is as follows:

asadmin [asadmin-util-options] [subcommand [subcommand-options] [operands]]

The replaceable items in this syntax are described in the subsections that follow. For full details of this syntax, see the asadmin(1M) help page.

Subcommands of the asadmin Utility

The subcommand identifies the operation or task that you are performing. Subcommands are case-sensitive. Each subcommand is either a local subcommand or a remote subcommand.

  • A local subcommand can be run without a running domain administration server (DAS). However, to run the subcommand and have access to the installation directory and the domain directory, the user must be logged in to the machine that hosts the domain.

  • A remote subcommand is always run by connecting to a DAS and running the subcommand there. A running DAS is required.

For a list of the subcommands for this release of Eclipse GlassFish, see Section 1 of the Eclipse GlassFish Reference Manual.

asadmin Utility Options and Subcommand Options

Options control the behavior of the asadmin utility and its subcommands. Options are case-sensitive.

The asadmin utility has the following types of options:

  • asadmin utility options. These options control the behavior of the asadmin utility, not the subcommand. The asadmin utility options may precede or follow the subcommand, but asadmin utility options after the subcommand are deprecated. All asadmin utility options must either precede or follow the subcommand. If asadmin utility options are specified both before and after the subcommand, an error occurs. For a description of the asadmin utility options, see the asadmin(1M) help page.

  • Subcommand Options. These options control the behavior of the subcommand, not the asadmin utility. Subcommand options must follow the subcommand. For a description of a subcommand’s options, see the entry for the subcommand in the Eclipse GlassFish Reference Manual.

    Not all subcommand options are supported for this release of Eclipse GlassFish. If you specify an unsupported option, a syntax error does not occur. Instead, the command runs successfully and the unsupported option is silently ignored.

A subcommand option may have the same name as an asadmin utility option, but the effects of the two options are different.

Options have a long form and a short form.

  • The short form of an option has a single dash (-) followed by a single character.

  • The long form of an option has two dashes (--) followed by an option word.

For example, the short form and the long form of the option for specifying terse output are as follows:

  • Short form: -t

  • Long form: --terse

Most options require argument values, except Boolean options, which toggle to enable or disable a feature.

Operands of asadmin Utility Subcommands

Operands specify the items on which the subcommand is to act. Operands must follow the argument values of subcommand options, and are set off by a space, a tab, or double dashes (--). The asadmin utility treats anything that follows the subcommand options and their values as an operand.

To Run an asadmin Utility Subcommand in Single Mode

In single mode, you must type a separate asadmin command for each subcommand that you want to use. After the subcommand has run, you are returned to the operating system’s command shell. Any asadmin utility options must be specified in each separate asadmin command that you run. If you require the same asadmin utility options for multiple subcommands, use the asadmin utility in multimode. For more information, see To Start a Multimode Session.

  1. In the operating system’s command shell, run the asadmin utility, specifying the subcommand.

  2. If necessary, also specify any required asadmin utility options, subcommand options, and operands.

Example 2-1 Running an asadmin Utility Subcommand in Single Mode

This example runs the list-applications subcommand in single mode. In this example, the default values for all options are used.

The example shows that the application hello is deployed on the local host.

asadmin list-applications
hello <web>
Command list-applications executed successfully.

Example 2-2 Specifying an asadmin Utility Option With a Subcommand in Single Mode

This example specifies the --host asadmin utility option with the list-applications subcommand in single mode. In this example, the DAS is running on the host srvr1.example.com.

The example shows that the applications basic-ezcomp, scrumtoys, ejb31-war, and automatic-timer-ejb are deployed on the host srvr1.example.com.

asadmin --host srvr1.example.com list-applications
basic-ezcomp <web>
scrumtoys <web>
ejb31-war <ejb, web>
automatic-timer-ejb <ejb>
Command list-applications executed successfully.

Example 2-3 Specifying an asadmin Utility Option and a Subcommand Option in Single Mode

This example specifies the --host asadmin utility option and the --type subcommand option with the list-applications subcommand in single mode. In this example, the DAS is running on the host srvr1.example.com and applications of type web are to be listed.

asadmin --host srvr1.example.com list-applications --type web
basic-ezcomp <web>
scrumtoys <web>
ejb31-war <ejb, web>
Command list-applications executed successfully.

To Display Help Information for the asadmin Utility or a Subcommand

Eclipse GlassFish provides help information about the syntax, purpose, and options of the asadmin utility and its subcommands. This help information is written in the style of UNIX platform man pages. This help information is also available in the Eclipse GlassFish Reference Manual.

  1. If you are displaying help information for a remote subcommand, ensure that the server is running.

    Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Specify the subcommand of interest as the operand of the help subcommand.

    If you run the help subcommand without an operand, help information for the asadmin utility is displayed.

Example 2-4 Displaying Help Information for the asadmin Utility

This example displays the help information for the asadmin utility.

asadmin help

Example 2-5 Displaying Help Information for an asadmin Utility Subcommand

This example displays the help information for the create-jdbc-resource subcommand.

asadmin help create-jdbc-resource

See Also

To display the available subcommands, use the list-commands subcommand. Local subcommands are displayed before remote subcommands. If the server is not running, only local subcommands are displayed.

To Start a Multimode Session

The asadmin utility can be used in multiple command mode, or multimode. In multimode, you run the asadmin utility once to start a multimode session. During the session, the asadmin utility continues to accept subcommands until you end the session and return to the operating system’s command shell. Any asadmin utility options that you set for your multimode session are used for all subsequent subcommands in the session.

Starting a multimode session does not require a running DAS.

  1. Do one of the following:

    • Run the asadmin utility without a subcommand.

    • Use the multimode subcommand.

  2. If necessary, also specify any asadmin utility options that will apply throughout the multimode session.

  3. In a multimode session, the asadmin> prompt is displayed on the command line. You can now type asadmin subcommands at this prompt to administer Eclipse GlassFish.

Example 2-6 Starting a Multimode Session With asadmin Utility Options

This example starts a multimode session in which the asadmin utility options --user and --passwordfile are set for the session.

asadmin --user admin1 --passwordfile pwd.txt multimode

Example 2-7 Starting a Multimode Session by Using the multimode Subcommand

This example uses the multimode subcommand to start a multimode session in which the default asadmin utility options are used.

asadmin multimode

The asadmin> prompt is displayed on the command line.

Example 2-8 Running a Subcommand in a Multimode Session

This example starts a multimode session and runs the list-domains subcommand in the session.

asadmin
Enter commands one per "line", ^D to quit
asadmin> list-domains
Name: domain1 Status: Running
Command list-domains executed successfully.
asadmin>

Starting a Multimode Session From Within an Existing Multimode Session

You can start a multimode session from within an existing session by running the multimode subcommand from within the existing session. After you end the second multimode session, you return to your original multimode session.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help multimode at the command line.

To End a Multimode Session

At the asadmin> prompt, type one of the following commands or key combinations:

  • exit

  • quit

  • UNIX and Linux systems: Ctrl-D

  • Windows systems: Ctrl-Z

Do not type Ctrl-C to end a multimode session. If a domain or Eclipse GlassFish instance is started from the multimode session, typing Ctrl-C kills the domain or instance process.

You are returned to the operating system’s command shell and the asadmin> prompt is no longer displayed. If the asadmin> prompt is still displayed, you might have opened a multimode session within a multimode session. In this situation, repeat this procedure to end the remaining multimode session.

To Run a Set of asadmin Subcommands From a File

Running a set of asadmin subcommands from a file enables you to automate repetitive tasks.

  1. Create a plain text file that contains the sequence of subcommands that you want to run.

  2. Run the multimode subcommand, specifying the file that you created.

    If necessary, also specify any asadmin utility options that are required to enable subcommands in the file to run.

Example 2-9 Running a Set of asadmin Subcommands From a File

This example contains the following:

  • A listing of a file that is named commands_file.txt, which contains a sequence of asadmin subcommands

  • The command to run the subcommands in the file commands_file.txt

The commands_file.txt file contains the asadmin utility subcommands to perform the following sequence of operations:

  1. Creating the domain customdomain

  2. Starting the domain customdomain

  3. Listing all available subcommands

  4. Stopping the domain customdomain

  5. Deleting the domain customdomain

The content of the commands_file.txt file is as follows:

create-domain --portbase 9000 customdomain
start-domain customdomain
list-commands
stop-domain customdomain
delete-domain customdomain

This example runs the sequence of subcommands in the commands_file.txt file. Because the --portbase option is specified for the create-domain subcommand in the file, the --port asadmin utility option must also be set.

asadmin --port 9048 multimode --file commands_file.txt

See Also

For more information about the subcommands in the preceding example, see the following help pages:

To Run asadmin Subcommands in --detach Mode

You can use the --detach option of the asadmin utility to detach asadmin subcommands and run them in the background in detach mode. The asadmin --detach option is useful for long-running subcommands and enables you to run several independent subcommands from one console or script.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote commands require a running server.

  2. Detach and run the subcommand by using the asadmin --detach option.

Example 2-10 Using the --detach Option in Single Mode

This example uses the asadmin --detach option in single mode to run the create-cluster subcommand.

asadmin --detach create-cluster Cluster1
Job ID: 1
Command create-cluster started successfully.

Example 2-11 Using the --detach Option in Multimode

This example uses the asadmin --detach option in multimode to run the create-cluster subcommand.

asadmin> create-cluster Cluster1 --detach
Job ID: 1
Command create-cluster started successfully.

Job IDs are assigned to subcommands that are started using the asadmin --detach option or that contain progress information. You can use the list-jobs subcommand to list jobs and their job IDs, the attach subcommand to reattach to a job and view its status, and the configure-managed-jobs subcommand to configure how long information about jobs is kept.

Example 2-12 Listing Jobs

This example runs the list-jobs subcommand in multimode to list jobs and job information.

asadmin> list-jobs
JOB ID     COMMAND           STATE       EXIT CODE TIME OF COMPLETION
1          create-cluster    COMPLETED   SUCCESS   2013-02-15 16:16:16 PST
2          deploy            COMPLETED   FAILURE   2013-02-15 18:26:30 PST
Command list-jobs executed successfully

Example 2-13 Attaching to a Subcommand and Checking Its Status

This example runs the attach subcommand in multimode to attach to the create-cluster subcommand with a job ID of 1. If a subcommand is still in progress, the output displays the current status, such as percentage complete.

asadmin> attach 1
Command create-cluster executed with status SUCCESS.
Command attach executed successfully.

Example 2-14 Configuring Managed Jobs

This example runs the configure-managed-jobs subcommand in multimode to set the job retention period to 36 hours. Time periods can be specified in Hh|Mm|Ss for hours, minutes, or seconds.

asadmin> configure-managed-jobs --job-retention-period=36h
Command configure-managed-jobs executed successfully.

See Also

For the full syntax and options of the subcommands in the preceding examples, see the following help pages:

Administering System Properties

Shared server instances will often need to override attributes defined in their referenced configuration. Any configuration attribute can be overridden through a system property of the corresponding name.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create System Properties

Use the create-system-properties subcommand in remote mode to create or update one or more system properties of the domain or configuration. Any configuration attribute can be overwritten through a system property of the corresponding name.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create system properties by using the create-system-properties subcommand.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

Example 2-15 Creating a System Property

This example creates a system property associated with http-listener-port=1088 on localhost.

asadmin> create-system-properties http-listener-port=1088
Command create-system-properties executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-system-properties at the command line.

To List System Properties

Use the list-system-properties subcommand in remote mode to list the system properties that apply to a domain, cluster, or server instance or configuration.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List system properties by using the list-system-properties subcommand.

    The existing system properties are displayed, including predefined properties such as HTTP_LISTENER_PORT and HTTP_SSL_LISTENER_PORT.

Example 2-16 Listing System Properties

This example lists the system properties on host localhost.

asadmin> list-system-properties
http-listener-port=1088
Command list-system-properties executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-system-properties at the command line.

To Delete a System Property

Use the delete-system-property subcommand in remote mode to delete system properties.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the existing system properties by using the list-system-properties subcommand.

  3. Delete the system property by using the delete-system-property subcommand.

  4. If necessary, notify users that the system property has been deleted.

Example 2-17 Deleting a System Property

This example deletes a system property named http-listener-port from localhost.

asadmin> delete-system-property http-listener-port
Command delete-system-property executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-system-property at the command line.

Using Configuration Modularity

With configuration modularity in Eclipse GlassFish, new modules can be added to Eclipse GlassFish distributions without modifying the global domain.xml configuration file. Default configuration data for modules is stored in the modules themselves, rather than in domain.xml, and loaded when needed.

Module configuration elements are stored in domain.xml only when the default configuration included in the module is changed or when module configuration elements are added to domain.xml using the create-module-config subcommand. The delete-module-config subcommand removes module configuration elements from domain.xml, and the get-active-module-config subcommand displays the current active configuration of a module.

To Add the Default Configuration of a Module to domain.xml

Use the create-module-config subcommand to add the default configuration of a module to domain.xml.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Add the default configuration of a module to domain.xml by using the create-module-config subcommand.

Example 2-18 Adding Module Configuration to domain.xml

This example adds the default configuration of the web container module to domain1 in server-config (the default configuration). Use the --dryrun option to preview the configuration before it is added.

asadmin> create-module-config web-container
Command create-module-config executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-module-config at the command line.

To Remove the Configuration of a Module From domain.xml

Use the delete-module-config subcommand to remove the configuration of a module from domain.xml and cause the module to use the default configuration included in the module.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Remove the configuration of a module from domain.xml by using the delete-module-config subcommand.

Example 2-19 Removing Module Configuration From domain.xml

This example deletes the configuration of the web container module from domain1 in server-config (the default configuration).

asadmin> delete-module-config web-container
Command delete-module-config executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-module-config at the command line.

To Display the Current Active Configuration of a Module

Use the get-active-module-config subcommand to display the current active configuration of a module.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Display the current active configuration of a module by using the get-active-module-config subcommand.

Example 2-20 Displaying the Current Active Configuration of a Module

This example displays the current active configuration of the JMS service in server-config (the default configuration).

asadmin> get-active-module-config jms-service
At location: domain/configs/config[server-config]
<jms-service default-jms-host="default_JMS_host" type="EMBEDDED"
  <jms-host port="7676" host="localhost" name="default_JMS_host"/>
</jms-service>
Command get-active-module-config executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help get-active-module-config at the command line.

Administering Resources

This section contains instructions for integrating resources into the Eclipse GlassFish environment. Information about administering specific resources, such as JDBC, is contained in other chapters.

To Add Resources From an XML File

Use the add-resources subcommand in remote mode to create the resources named in the specified XML file. The following resources are supported: JDBC connection pool and resource, JMS, JNDI, and JavaMail resources, custom resource, connector resource and work security map, admin object, and resource adapter configuration.

The XML file must reside in the domain-dir/config directory. If you specify a relative path or simply provide the name of the XML file, this subcommand will prepend domain-dir/config to this operand.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Add resources from an XML file by using the add-resources subcommand.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. Restart Eclipse GlassFish.

Example 2-21 Adding Resources

This example creates resources using the contents of the resource.xml file on localhost.

asadmin> add-resources c:\tmp\resource.xml
Command : JDBC resource jdbc1 created successfully.
Command : JDBC connection pool poolA created successfully.
Command add-resources executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help add-resources at the command line.

Listing Various System Elements

The following topics are addressed here:

To Display the Eclipse GlassFish Version

Use the version subcommand in remote mode to display information about the Eclipse GlassFish version for a particular server. If the subcommand cannot communicate with the server by using the specified login (user/password) and target (host/port) information, then the local version is displayed along with a warning message.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Display the version by using the version subcommand.

Example 2-22 Displaying Version Information

This example displays the version of Eclipse GlassFish on the local host.

asadmin> version
Version = Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.0 (build 19)
Command version executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help version at the command line.

To List Applications

Use the list-applications subcommand in remote mode to list the deployed Java applications. If the --type option is not specified, all applications are listed.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List applications by using the list-applications subcommand.

Example 2-23 Listing Applications

This example lists the web applications on localhost.

asadmin> list-applications --type web
hellojsp <web>
Command list-applications executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-applications at the command line.

To List Containers

Use the list-containers subcommand in remote mode to list application containers.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List containers by using the list-containers subcommand.

Example 2-24 Listing Containers

This example lists the containers on localhost.

asadmin> list-containers
List all known application containers
Container : grizzly
Container : ejb
Container : webservices
Container : ear
Container : appclient
Container : connector
Container : jpa
Container : web
Container : security
Container : webbeans
Command list-containers executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-containers at the command line.

To List Modules

Use the list-modules subcommand in remote mode to list the modules that are accessible to the Eclipse GlassFish module subsystem. The status of each module is included. Possible statuses include NEW and READY.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List modules by using the list-modules subcommand.

Example 2-25 Listing Modules

This example lists the accessible modules.

asadmin> list-modules

Information similar to the following is displayed (partial output):

List Of Modules
Module : org.glassfish.web.jstl-connector:10.0.0.b28
    properties=(visibility=public,State=READY,Sticky=true)
    Module Characteristics : List of Jars implementing the module
        Jar : file:/C:/Preview/v3_Preview_release/distributions/web/target/glass
fish/modules/web/jstl-connector.jar
    Module Characteristics : List of imported modules
    Module Characteristics : Provides to following services
Module : org.glassfish.admingui.console-common:10.0.0.b28
    properties=(visibility=public,State=NEW,Sticky=true)
Module : org.glassfish.admin.launcher:10.0.0.b28
    properties=(visibility=public,State=NEW,Sticky=true)
Module : org.glassfish.external.commons-codec-repackaged:10.0.0.b28
    properties=(visibility=public,State=NEW,Sticky=true)
Module : com.sun.enterprise.tiger-types-osgi:0.3.32.Preview-b28
    properties=(visibility=public,State=READY,Sticky=true)
    Module Characteristics : List of imported modules
    Module Characteristics : Provides to following services
    Module Characteristics : List of Jars implementing the module
        Jar : file:/C:/Preview/v3_Preview_release/distributions/web/target/glass
fish/modules/tiger-types-osgi.jar.
...
Command list-modules executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-modules at the command line.

To List Subcommands

Use the list-commands subcommand in remote mode to list the deployed asadmin subcommands. You can specify that only remote subcommands or only local subcommands are listed. By default, this subcommand displays a list of local subcommands followed by a list of remote subcommands.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List subcommands by using the list-commands subcommand.

Example 2-26 Listing Subcommands

This example lists only local subcommands.

asadmin> list-commands --localonly
create-domain
delete-domain
list-commands
list-domains
login
monitor
start-database
start-domain
stop-domain
stop-database
version
Command list-commands executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-commands at the command line.

To List Timers

The timer service is a persistent and transactional notification service that is provided by the enterprise bean container and is used to schedule notifications or events used by enterprise beans. All enterprise beans except stateful session beans can receive notifications from the timer service. Persistent timers set by the service are not destroyed when the server is shut down or restarted.

Use the list-timers subcommand in remote mode to list the persistent timers owned by a specific server instance. You can use this information to decide whether to do a timer migration, or to verify that a migration has been completed successfully.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List timers by using the list-timers subcommand.

Example 2-27 Listing Timers

This example lists the timers in a particular standalone server instance. There is one currently active timer set.

asadmin> list-timers server
1
The list-timers command was executed successfully.

To Show Component Status

Use the show-component-status subcommand in remote mode to get the status (either enabled or disabled) of the specified deployed component.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Show component status by using the show-component-status subcommand.

Example 2-28 Showing Status of a Component

This example shows the status of the MEjbApp component.

asadmin> show-component-status MEjbApp
Status of MEjbApp is enabled
Command show-component-status executed successfully.

Using REST Interfaces to Administer Eclipse GlassFish

Eclipse GlassFish provides representational state transfer (REST) interfaces to enable you to access monitoring and configuration data for Eclipse GlassFish, including data that is provided by newly installed add-on components.

You can access the Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces through client applications such as:

You can also use the Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces in REST client applications that are developed in languages such as:

  • JavaScript

  • Ruby

  • Perl

  • Java

  • JavaFX

The implementation of the Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces is based on project Jersey. Project Jersey is the reference implementation of Java Specification Request (JSR) 311: JAX-RS: The Java API for RESTful Web Services. Information about JSR 311 is also available from the JSR 311 project home page . Information about Jakarta RESTful Web Services is here: https://jakarta.ee/specifications/restful-ws/

The following topics are addressed here:

Using REST URLs to Administer Eclipse GlassFish

Each object in the configuration and monitoring object trees is represented as a REST resource that is accessible through an HTTP uniform resource locator (URL). Access to REST resources for Eclipse GlassFish monitoring and configuration data requires a running DAS.

REST URLs to Resources for Configuration and Monitoring Objects

The formats of the URLs to resources that represent objects in the configuration and monitoring object trees are as follows:

The replaceable items in these URLs are as follows:

host

The host where the DAS is running.

port

The HTTP port or HTTPS port for administration.

path

The path to the object. The path is the dotted name of the object in which each dot (.) is replaced with a slash (/).

The path to a Eclipse GlassFish instance is servers/server/instance-name, where instance-name is the name of the instance. For the DAS, instance-name is server and the path is servers/server/server.

For more information, see the following documentation:

If the URL to a REST resource for Eclipse GlassFish monitoring or configuration data is opened in a web browser, the browser displays a web page that contains the following information about the resource:

  • A list of the attributes of the resource and their values. If the resource represents an object in the configuration tree, these attributes are presented in an HTML form that you can use to update the resource. Attributes of a resource for an object in the monitoring tree are read only.

  • A list of hypertext links to the children of the resource. This list of links enables you to traverse the tree that contains the resource and to discover the all resources in the tree.

  • A list of hypertext links to resources that represent asadmin subcommands for non-CRUD operations on the resource.

The following figure shows the web page for the REST resource for managing a domain.

Figure 2-1 Web Page for the REST Resource for Managing a Domain

Screen capture showing the web page for the REST resource for managing a domain.

REST URLs for Accessing the Log File

The server.log file of the DAS is represented as a child that is named view-log of the resource for managing the domain. A child of the resource for the server.log file represents the log file details

The formats of the URLs to resources that represent the log file are as follows:

  • Log file: http://host:port/management/domain/view-log

  • Log file details: http://host:port/monitoring/domain/view-log/details

The replaceable items in these URLs are as follows:

host

The host where the DAS is running.

port

The HTTP port or HTTPS port for administration.

You can use the optional start parameter in the URL to the resource for the log file to specify the number of characters at the start of the file to skip. For example, to skip 10,000 characters, specify the URL as http://localhost:4848/management/domain/view-log?start=10000. This example assumes that the DAS is running on the local host and uses the default port for administration.

The resource for the log file returns the HTTP header "X-Text-Append-Next", which contains the entire URL to pass to the GET method to return the changes since the last call. You can use this header in client applications to get all log entries that were added in particular interval. For example, by testing the value of the "X-Text-Append-Next" header in a client thread every 10 seconds, you can monitor the log entries that were added in the last 10 seconds.

Using REST Resource Methods to Administer Eclipse GlassFish

The Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces support methods for accessing objects in the monitoring and configuration object trees.

The following table shows the REST methods for administering monitoring and configuration data and the tasks that you can perform with each method. These methods are HTTP 1.1 primitives. For the detailed specification of these primitives, see Hypertext Transfer Protocol — HTTP/1.1 .

Table 2-1 REST Resource Methods for Administering Monitoring and Configuration Data

Task REST Method

Determine the methods and method parameters that an object in the tree supports

GET

Retrieve data for an object in the tree

GET

Add an object to the tree

POST

Update an object in the tree

POST

Delete an object from the tree

DELETE

REST requests that add, update, or delete objects must specify the X-Requested-By header with the value GlassFish REST HTML interface.

The GET method determines the methods and method parameters that an object in the tree supports and provides additional information about the object. For details, see To Retrieve Data for an Object in the Tree.

To Determine the Methods and Method Parameters That an Object in the Tree Supports

The methods and method parameters that an object in the tree supports depend on the REST resource that represents the object:

  • REST resources for monitoring support only the GET method.

  • All REST resources for configuration support the GET method. However, only some REST resources for configuration also support the POST method and the DELETE method.

Before performing any operations on an object in the tree, determine the methods and method parameters that the object supports.

You can specify the format in which this information is presented. For more information, see Formats for Resource Representation of Configuration Objects.

Each POST method and DELETE method that a REST resource supports has an equivalent asadmin subcommand. The parameters of a POST method or a DELETE method correspond to the options of the method’s equivalent asadmin subcommand. For information about the options of asadmin subcommand, see the oEclipse GlassFish Reference Manual.

  1. Ensure that the server is running.

    Operations on REST resources for Eclipse GlassFish data require a running server.

  2. Use the GET method on the REST resource that represents the object.

    The GET method returns the list of methods that the resource supports. For each method, the list of acceptable message parameters or the list of acceptable query parameters are returned.

Example 2-29 Determining the Methods and Method Parameters That an Object in the Tree Supports

This example uses the cURL utility to determine the methods and method parameters that the resource for the node sj01 supports. The example uses the following options of the cURL utility:

  • -X to specify that the GET method is used

  • -H to specify that the resource is represented in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)

In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848. The resource supports the GET method and the POST method.

Line breaks and white space are added to enhance readability.

curl -X GET -H "Accept: application/json" http://localhost:4848/management/domain/nodes/node/sj01
{
  "command":"Node",
  "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
  "extraProperties":{
    "commands":[
      {"path":"_delete-node","command":"delete-node","method":"DELETE"},
      {"path":"_update-node","command":"_update-node","method":"POST"},
      {"path":"ping-node-ssh","command":"ping-node-ssh","method":"GET"},
      {"path":"update-node-ssh","command":"update-node-ssh","method":"POST"},
      {"path":"update-node-config","command":"update-node-config","method":"POST"}],
    "methods":[
      {"name":"GET"},
      {"name":"POST","messageParameters":{
        "installDir":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
        "nodeDir":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
        "nodeHost":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
        "type":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"}
        }
      }
    ],
    "entity":{
      "installDir":"\/export\/glassfish7",
      "name":"sj01",
      "nodeDir":null,
      "nodeHost":
      "sj01.example.com",
      "type":"SSH"
    },
    "childResources":{
      "application-ref":
        "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/nodes\/node\/sj01\/application-ref",
      "resource-ref":
        "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/nodes\/node\/sj01\/resource-ref",
      "ssh-connector":
        "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/nodes\/node\/sj01\/ssh-connector"
    }
  }
}
To Retrieve Data for an Object in the Tree

Retrieving data for an object in the tree obtains the following information about the REST resource that represents the object:

  • A list of the REST methods that the resource supports

  • A list of the attributes of the resource and their values

  • A list of URLs to the children of the resource

You can specify the format in which this information is presented. For more information, see Formats for Resource Representation of Configuration Objects.

  1. Ensure that the server is running.

    Operations on REST resources for Eclipse GlassFish data require a running server.

  2. Use the GET method on the REST resource that represents the object.

Example 2-30 Retrieving Data for an Object in the Tree

This example uses the cURL utility to retrieve data for the resource for a the node sj01. The example uses the following options of the cURL utility:

  • -X to specify that the GET method is used

  • -H to specify that the resource is represented in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)

In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848.

Line breaks and white space are added to enhance readability.

curl -X GET -H "Accept: application/json" http://localhost:4848/management/domain/nodes/node/sj01
{
  "command":"Node",
  "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
  "extraProperties":{
    "commands":[
      {"path":"_delete-node","command":"delete-node","method":"DELETE"},
      {"path":"_update-node","command":"_update-node","method":"POST"},
      {"path":"ping-node-ssh","command":"ping-node-ssh","method":"GET"},
      {"path":"update-node-ssh","command":"update-node-ssh","method":"POST"},
      {"path":"update-node-config","command":"update-node-config","method":"POST"}],
    "methods":[
      {"name":"GET"},
      {"name":"POST","messageParameters":{
        "installDir":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
        "nodeDir":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
        "nodeHost":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
        "type":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"}
        }
      }
    ],
    "entity":{
      "installDir":"\/export\/glassfish7",
      "name":"sj01",
      "nodeDir":null,
      "nodeHost":
      "sj01.example.com",
      "type":"SSH"
    },
    "childResources":{
      "application-ref":
        "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/nodes\/node\/sj01\/application-ref",
      "resource-ref":
        "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/nodes\/node\/sj01\/resource-ref",
      "ssh-connector":
        "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/nodes\/node\/sj01\/ssh-connector"
    }
  }
}
To Add an Object to the Tree
  1. Ensure that the server is running.

    Operations on REST resources for Eclipse GlassFish data require a running server.

  2. Determine the acceptable message parameters for the POST method of the resource that represents the parent of the object.

    For information about how to perform this step, see To Determine the Methods and Method Parameters That an Object in the Tree Supports.

  3. Use the POST method on the REST resource that represents the parent of the object that you are adding.

  4. Confirm that the object has been added.

    Perform this step on the resource that represents the object that you have just added, not the parent. For information about how to perform this step, see To Retrieve Data for an Object in the Tree.

Example 2-31 Adding an Object to the Tree

This example uses the cURL utility to add a JDBC resource object to the tree by creating a REST resource to represent the JDBC resource.

In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848.

Line breaks are added to enhance readability.

  1. This step determines the acceptable message parameters for the POST method of the resource jdbc-resource.

    curl -X GET -H "Accept: application/json"
    http://localhost:4848/management/domain/resources/jdbc-resource
    {
      "command":"Jdbc-resource",
      "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
      "extraProperties":{
        "commands":[],
        "methods":[
          {"name":"GET"},
          {"name":"POST","messageParameters":{
            "description":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":""},
            "enabled":{"acceptableValues":"",optional":"true","type":"boolean",defaultValue":"true"},
            "id":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"false","type":"string","defaultValue":""},
            "poolName":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"false","type":"string","defaultValue":""},
            "property":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":"},
            "target":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":""}
            }
          }
        ],
        "childResources":{
          "jdbc\/__TimerPool":
            "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/resources\/jdbc-resource\/jdbc%2F__TimerPool",
          "jdbc\/__default":
            "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/resources\/jdbc-resource\/jdbc%2F__default"
        }
      }
    }
  2. This step adds a resource as a child of the jdbc-resource resource. The -d option of the cURL utility sets the required message parameters as follows:

    • id is set to jdbc/myjdbcresource.

    • connectionpoolid is set to DerbyPool.

      curl -X POST -H "X-Requested-By: GlassFish REST HTML interface"
      -d id=jdbc/myjdbcresource -d connectionpoolid=DerbyPool
      http://localhost:4848/management/domain/resources/jdbc-resource
  3. This step confirms that the object has been added by retrieving data for the REST resource that represents the object.

    curl -X GET -H "Accept: application/json"
    http://localhost:4848/management/domain/resources/
    jdbc-resource/jdbc%2Fmyjdbcresource
    {
      "command":"Jdbc-resource",
      "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
      "extraProperties":{
        "commands":[],
        "methods":[
          {"name":"GET"},
          {"name":"POST","messageParameters":{
            "description":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
            "enabled":{"optional":"true","type":"boolean","defaultValue":"true","key":"false"},
            "jndiName":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"true"},
            "objectType":{"optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":"user","key":"false"},
            "poolName":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"}
            }
          },
          {"name":"DELETE","messageParameters":{
            "target":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":""}
            }
          }
        ],
        "childResources":{
          "property":
            "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/resources\/jdbc-resource\/jdbc%2Fmyjdbcresource\/property"
        }
      }
    }
To Update an Object in the Tree
  1. Ensure that the server is running. Operations on REST resources for Eclipse GlassFish data require a running server.

  2. Determine the acceptable message parameters for the POST method of the resource that represents the object. For information about how to perform this step, see To Determine the Methods and Method Parameters That an Object in the Tree Supports.

  3. Use the POST method on the REST resource that represents the object that you are updating.

  4. Confirm that the object has been updated. For information about how to perform this step, see To Retrieve Data for an Object in the Tree.

Example 2-32 Updating an Object in the Tree

This example uses the cURL utility to update a JDBC resource in the tree by modifying the REST resource that represents the JDBC resource.

In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848.

Line breaks are added to enhance readability.

  1. This step determines the acceptable message parameters for the POST method of the resource jdbc-myjdbcresource.

    curl -X OPTIONS -H "Accept: application/json"
    http://localhost:4848/management/domain/resources/
    jdbc-resource/jdbc-myjdbcresource
    {
      "command":"Jdbc-resource",
      "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
      "extraProperties":{
        "commands":[],
        "methods":[
          {"name":"GET"},
          {"name":"POST","messageParameters":{
            "description":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
            "enabled":{"optional":"true","type":"boolean","defaultValue":"true","key":"false"},
            "jndiName":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"true"},
            "objectType":{"optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":"user","key":"false"},
            "poolName":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"}
            }
          },
          {"name":"DELETE","messageParameters":{
            "target":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":""}
            }
          }
        ],
        "childResources":{
          "property":
            "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/resources\/jdbc-resource\/jdbc%2Fmyjdbcresource\/property"
        }
      }
    }
  2. This step updates the REST resource jdbc-myjdbcresource to disable the JDBC resource that jdbc-myjdbcresource represents. The -d option of the cURL utility sets the enabled message parameter to disabled.

    curl -X POST -H "X-Requested-By: GlassFish REST HTML interface"
    -d "enabled=false" http://localhost:4848/management/domain/resources/
    jdbc-resource/jdbc%2Fmyjdbcresource
  3. This step confirms that the object has been updated by retrieving data for the REST resource that represents the object.

    curl -X GET -H "Accept: application/json"
    http://localhost:4848/management/domain/resources/
    jdbc-resource/jdbc%2Fmyjdbcresource
    {
      "command":"Jdbc-resource",
      "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
      "extraProperties":{
        "commands":[],
        "methods":[
          {"name":"GET"},
          {"name":"POST","messageParameters":{
            "description":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
            "enabled":{"optional":"true","type":"boolean","defaultValue":"true","key":"false"},
            "jndiName":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"true"},
            "objectType":{"optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":
            "user","key":"false"},
            "poolName":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"}
            }
          },
          {"name":"DELETE","messageParameters":{
            "target":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":""}
            }
          }
        ],
      "entity":{
        "description":null,
        "enabled":"false",
        "jndiName":"jdbc\/myjdbcresource",
        "objectType":
        "user",
        "poolName":"DerbyPool"
      },
      "childResources":{
        "property":
          "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/resources\/jdbc-resource\/
           jdbc%2Fmyjdbcresource\/property"
        }
      }
    }
To Delete an Object From the Tree
  1. Ensure that the server is running.

    Operations on REST resources for Eclipse GlassFish data require a running server.

  2. Confirm that the object can be deleted.

    For information about how to perform this step, see To Determine the Methods and Method Parameters That an Object in the Tree Supports.

  3. Confirm that the object has been deleted.

    Perform this step on the resource that represents the parent of the object that you have just deleted. For information about how to perform this step, see To Retrieve Data for an Object in the Tree.

Example 2-33 Deleting an Object From the Tree

This example uses the cURL utility to delete a JDBC resource from the tree by deleting the REST resource that represents the JDBC resource.

In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848.

Line breaks and white space are added to enhance readability.

  1. This step confirms that the object can be deleted by retrieving the REST methods that the resource jdbc-myjdbcresource supports.

    curl -X GET -H "Accept: application/json"
    http://localhost:4848/management/domain/resources/
    jdbc-resource/jdbc%2Fmyjdbcresource
    {
      "command":"Jdbc-resource",
      "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
      "extraProperties":{
        "commands":[],
        "methods":[
          {"name":"GET"},
          {"name":"POST","messageParameters":{
            "description":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
            "enabled":{"optional":"true","type":"boolean","defaultValue":"true","key":"false"},
            "jndiName":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"true"},
            "objectType":{"optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":"user","key":"false"},
            "poolName":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"}
            }
          },
          {"name":"DELETE","messageParameters":{
            "target":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":""}
            }
          }
        ],
        "childResources":{
          "property":
            "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/resources\/jdbc-resource\/
            jdbc%2Fmyjdbcresource\/property"
        }
      }
    }
  2. This step deletes the jdbc/myjdbcresource resource.

    curl -X DELETE -H "X-Requested-By: GlassFish REST HTML interface"
    http://localhost:4848/management/domain/resources/
    jdbc-resource/jdbc%2Fmyjdbcresource
  3. This step confirms that the object has been deleted by retrieving data for the REST resource that represents the parent of the object.

    curl -X GET -H "Accept: application/json"
    http://localhost:4848/management/domain/resources/jdbc-resource
    {
      "command":"Jdbc-resource",
      "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
      "extraProperties":{
        "commands":[],
        "methods":[
          {"name":"GET"},
          {"name":"POST","messageParameters":{
            "description":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":""},
            "enabled":{"acceptableValues":"",optional":"true","type":"boolean",defaultValue":"true"},
            "id":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"false","type":"string","defaultValue":""},
            "poolName":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"false","type":"string","defaultValue":""},
            "property":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":"},
            "target":{"acceptableValues":"","optional":"true","type":"string","defaultValue":""}
            }
          }
        ],
        "childResources":{
          "jdbc\/__TimerPool":
            "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/resources\/jdbc-resource\/jdbc%2F__TimerPool",
          "jdbc\/__default":
            "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/resources\/jdbc-resource\/jdbc%2F__default"
        }
      }
    }

Resources for asadmin Subcommands That Perform Non-CRUD Operations

The Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces also support operations other than create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) operations, for example:

  • State management

  • Queries

  • Application deployment

These operations are supported through REST resources that represent the asadmin subcommands for performing these operations. Each resource is a child of the resource on which the operation is performed. The child resources do not represent objects in the configuration object tree.

For example, the resource that represents a node provides child resources for the following asadmin subcommands that perform non-CRUD operations on the node:

  • ping-node-ssh

  • update-node-config

  • update-node-ssh

Securing Eclipse GlassFish REST Interfaces

The Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces support the following authentication schemes for securing the REST interfaces:

  • Basic authentication over a secure connection

  • Authentication by using session tokens

When security is enabled, you must specify https as the protocol in the URLs to REST resources and provide a user name and password.

Setting Up Basic Authentication Over a Secure Connection

Setting up basic authentication over a secure connection to secure Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces involves the following sequence of tasks:

  1. Adding an admin-realm user to the asadmin user group

  2. Enabling Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)

For information about how to perform these tasks from the command line, see the following documentation:

For information about how to perform these tasks by using the Administration Console, see the following topics in the Administration Console online help:

  • To Add a User to the Admin Realm

  • To Edit SSL Settings for a Protocol

To Secure REST Interfaces by Using Session Tokens

Basic authentication requires a REST client to cache a user’s credentials to enable the client to pass the credentials with each request. If you require a REST client not to cache credentials, your client must use session tokens for authentication.

  1. Request a session token by using the GET method on the resource at http://`host:`port`/management/sessions`. Eclipse GlassFish uses basic authentication to authenticate the client, generates a session token, and passes the token to the client.

  2. In each subsequent request that requires authentication, use the token to authenticate the client.

    1. Create a cookie that is named gfresttoken the value of which is the token.

    2. Send the cookie with the request.

    3. When the token is no longer required, retire the token by using the DELETE method on the resource at http://`host:`port`/management/sessions/{tokenvalue}`.

      If a client does not explicitly retire a token, the token is retired after 30 minutes of inactivity.

Formats for Resource Representation of Configuration Objects

The Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces represent resources for configuration objects in the following formats:

Eclipse GlassFish enables you to specify the resource representation through the filename extension in the URL or through the HTTP header:

  • To specify the resource representation through the filename extension in the URL, specify the appropriate extension as follows:

    • For JSON, specify the .json extension.

    • For XML, specify the .xml extension.

    • For HTML, omit the extension.

  • How to specify the resource representation through the HTTP header depends on the client that you are using to access the resource. For example, if you are using the cURL utility, specify the resource representation through the -H option as follows:

    • For JSON, specify -H "Accept: application/json".

    • For XML, specify -H "Accept: application/xml".

    • For HTML, omit the -H option.

JSON Resource Representation for Configuration Objects

The general format for the JSON representation of a resource for a configuration object is as follows:

{
  "command":"resource",
  "exit_code":"code",
  "extraProperties":{
    "commands":[command-list],
    "methods":[method-list],
    "entity":{attributes},
    "childResources":{children}
  }
}

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

resource

The name of the resource.

code

The result of the attempt to get the resource.

command-list

One or more metadata sets separated by a comma (,) that represent the asadmin subcommands for performing non—CRUD operations on the resource. For the format of each metadata set, see JSON Representation of a Command in a Command List.

method-list

One or more metadata sets separated by a comma (,) that represent the methods that the resource supports. For the format of each metadata set, see JSON Representation of a Method in a Method List.

attributes

Zero or more name-value pairs separated by a comma (,). Each name-value pair is specified as `“name”:`value.

children

Zero or more child resources separated by a comma (,). Each child resource is specified as "resource-name":"url".

resource-name

The name of the resource as displayed in client applications that access the parent of the resource.

url

The URL to the child resource.

JSON Representation of a Command in a Command List

The JSON representation of a command in a command list is as follows:

{
  "path":"command-path",
  "command":"command-name",
  "method":"rest-method"
}

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

command-path

The relative path to REST resource that represents the command. This path is relative to the URL of the REST resource that is the parent of the resource that represents the command.

command-name

The name of the command as displayed in client applications that access the resource.

rest-method

The REST resource method that the command invokes when the command is run. The method is GET, POST, or DELETE.

JSON Representation of a Method in a Method List

The JSON representation of a method in a method list is as follows:

{
    "name":"method-name",
    "messageParameters":{
        message-parameter-list
    }
    "queryParameters":{
        queryparameter- list
    }
}

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

method-name

The name of the method, which is GET, POST, or DELETE.

message-parameter-list

Zero or more metadata sets separated by a comma (,) that represent the message parameters that are allowed for the method. For the format of each metadata set, see JSON Representation of a Message Parameter or a Query Parameter.

query-parameter-list

Zero or more metadata sets separated by a comma (,) that represent the query parameters that are allowed for the method. For the format of each metadata set, see JSON Representation of a Message Parameter or a Query Parameter.

JSON Representation of a Message Parameter or a Query Parameter

The JSON representation of a message parameter or a query parameter is as follows:

"parameter-name":{attribute-list}

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

parameter-name

The name of the parameter.

attribute-list

A comma-separated list of name-value pairs of attributes for the parameter. Each pair is in the following format:

"name":"value"

Possible attributes are as follows:

defaultValue

The default value of the parameter.

acceptableValues

The set or range of acceptable values for the parameter.

type

The data type of the parameter, which is one of the following types:

  • boolean

  • int

  • string

optional

Indicates whether the parameter is optional. If true, the parameter is optional. If false, the parameter is required.

key

Indicates whether the parameter is key. If true, the parameter is key. If false, the parameter is not key.

Example JSON Resource Representation for a Configuration Object

This example shows the JSON representation of the resource for the node sj01. In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848. The URL to the resource in this example is http://localhost:4848/management/domain/nodes/node/sj01.

Line breaks and white space are added to enhance readability.

{
  "command":"Node",
  "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
  "extraProperties":{
    "commands":[
      {"path":"_delete-node","command":"delete-node","method":"DELETE"},
      {"path":"_update-node","command":"_update-node","method":"POST"},
      {"path":"ping-node-ssh","command":"ping-node-ssh","method":"GET"},
      {"path":"update-node-ssh","command":"update-node-ssh","method":"POST"},
      {"path":"update-node-config","command":"update-node-config","method":"POST"}],
    "methods":[
      {"name":"GET"},
      {"name":"POST","messageParameters":{
        "installDir":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
        "nodeDir":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
        "nodeHost":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"},
        "type":{"optional":"true","type":"string","key":"false"}
        }
      }
    ],
    "entity":{
      "installDir":"\/export\/glassfish7",
      "name":"sj01",
      "nodeDir":null,
      "nodeHost":
      "sj01.example.com",
      "type":"SSH"
    },
    "childResources":{
      "application-ref":
       "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/nodes\/node\/sj01\/application-ref",
      "resource-ref":
       "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/nodes\/node\/sj01\/resource-ref",
      "ssh-connector":
       "https:\/\/localhost:4848\/management\/domain\/nodes\/node\/sj01\/ssh-connector"
    }
  }
}
XML Resource Representation for Configuration Objects

The general format for the XML representation of a resource for a configuration object is as follows:

<map>
 <entry key="extraProperties">
  <map>
   <entry key="methods">
    <list>
     methods
    </list>
   </entry>
   <entry key="entity">
    <map>
     attributes
    </map>
   </entry>
   <entry key="commands">
    <list>
     commands
    </list>
   </entry>
   <entry key="childResources">
    <map>
    children
    </map>
   </entry>
  </map>
 </entry>
 <entry key="message"></entry>
 <entry key="exit_code" value="code"></entry>
 <entry key="command" value="resource"></entry>
</map>

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

methods

One or more XML elements that represent the methods that the resource supports. For the format of each element, see XML Representation of a Resource Method.

attributes

Zero or more XML elements that represent the attributes of the resource. Each element specifies a name-value pair as follows:

<entry key="name" value="value"></entry>
commands

One or more XML elements that represent the asadmin subcommands for performing non—CRUD operations on the resource. For the format of each element, see XML Representation of a Command.

children

Zero or more XML elements that represent the children of the resource. Each element is specified as follows:

<entry key="resource-name" value="url"></entry>
resource-name

The name of the resource as displayed in client applications that access the parent of the resource.

url

The URL to the child resource.

code

The result of the attempt to get the resource.

resource

The name of the resource.

XML Representation of a Resource Method

The XML representation of a method in a method list is as follows:

<map>
 <entry key="name" value="method-name"></entry>
 <entry key="messageParameters">
  message-parameter-list
 </entry>
 <entry key="queryParameters">
  message-parameter-list
 </entry>
</map>

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

method-name

The name of the method, which is GET, POST, or DELETE.

message-parameter-list

Zero or more XML elements that represent the message parameters that are allowed for the method. For the format of each element, see XML Representation of a Message Parameter or a Query Parameter.

query-parameter-list

Zero or more XML elements that represent the query parameters that are allowed for the method. For the format of each element, see XML Representation of a Message Parameter or a Query Parameter.

XML Representation of a Command

The XML representation of a command is as follows:

<map>
 <entry key="command" value="command-name"></entry>
 <entry key="path" value="command-path"></entry>
 <entry key="method" value="rest-method"></entry>
</map>

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

command-name

The name of the command as displayed in client applications that access the resource.

command-path

The relative path to REST resource that represents the command. This path is relative to the URL of the REST resource that is the parent of the resource that represents the command.

rest-method

The REST resource method that the command invokes when the command is run. The method is GET, POST, or DELETE.

XML Representation of a Message Parameter or a Query Parameter

The XML representation of a message parameter or a query parameter is as follows:

<map>
 <entry key="parameter-name">
  <map>
   attributes
  </map>
 </entry>
</map>

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

parameter-name

The name of the parameter.

attributes

One or more XML elements that represent the attributes for the parameter. Each element specifies a name-value pair as follows:

<entry key="name" value="value"></entry>

Possible attributes are as follows:

defaultValue

The default value of the parameter.

acceptablevalues

The set or range of acceptable values for the parameter.

type

The data type of the parameter, which is one of the following types:

  • boolean

  • int

  • string

optional

Indicates whether the parameter is optional. If true, the parameter is optional. If false, the parameter is required.

key

Indicates whether the parameter is key. If true, the parameter is key. If false, the parameter is not key.

Example XML Resource Representation

This example shows the XML representation of the resource for the node sj01. In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848. The URL to the resource in this example is http://localhost:4848/management/domain/nodes/node/sj01.

Line breaks and white space are added to enhance readability.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
<map>
 <entry key="extraProperties">
  <map>
   <entry key="methods">
    <list>
     <map>
      <entry key="name" value="GET"/>
     </map>
     <map>
      <entry key="name" value="POST"/>
      <entry key="messageParameters">
       <map>
        <entry key="installDir">
         <map>
          <entry key="optional" value="true"/>
          <entry key="type" value="string"/>
          <entry key="key" value="false"/>
         </map>
        </entry>
        <entry key="nodeDir">
         <map>
          <entry key="optional" value="true"/>
          <entry key="type" value="string"/>
          <entry key="key" value="false"/>
         </map>
        </entry>
        <entry key="type">
         <map>
          <entry key="optional" value="true"/>
          <entry key="type" value="string"/>
          <entry key="key" value="false"/>
         </map>
        </entry>
        <entry key="nodeHost">
         <map>
          <entry key="optional" value="true"/>
          <entry key="type" value="string"/>
          <entry key="key" value="false"/>
         </map>
        </entry>
       </map>
      </entry>
     </map>
    </list>
   </entry>
   <entry key="entity">
    <map>
     <entry key="installDir" value="/export/glassfish7"/>
     <entry key="name" value="sj01"/>
     <entry key="nodeDir" value=""/>
     <entry key="type" value="SSH"/>
     <entry key="nodeHost" value="sj01example.com"/>
    </map>
   </entry>
   <entry key="commands">
    <list>
     <map>
      <entry key="command" value="delete-node"/>
      <entry key="path" value="_delete-node"/>
      <entry key="method" value="DELETE"/>
     </map>
     <map>
      <entry key="command" value="_update-node"/>
      <entry key="path" value="_update-node"/>
      <entry key="method" value="POST"/>
     </map>
     <map>
      <entry key="command" value="ping-node-ssh"/>
      <entry key="path" value="ping-node-ssh"/>
      <entry key="method" value="GET"/>
     </map>
     <map>
      <entry key="command" value="update-node-ssh"/>
      <entry key="path" value="update-node-ssh"/>
      <entry key="method" value="POST"/>
     </map>
     <map>
      <entry key="command" value="update-node-config"/>
      <entry key="path" value="update-node-config"/>
      <entry key="method" value="POST"/>
     </map>
    </list>
   </entry>
   <entry key="childResources">
    <map>
     <entry key="application-ref"
      value="https://localhost:4848/management/domain/nodes/node/sj01/application-ref"/>
     <entry key="ssh-connector"
      value="https://localhost:4848/management/domain/nodes/node/sj01/ssh-connector"/>
     <entry key="resource-ref"
      value="https://localhost:4848/management/domain/nodes/node/sj01/resource-ref"/>
    </map>
   </entry>
  </map>
 </entry>
 <entry key="message"/>
 <entry key="exit_code" value="SUCCESS"/>
 <entry key="command" value="Node"/>
</map>
HTML Resource Representation for Configuration Objects

The format for the HTML representation of a resource for a configuration object is a web page that provides the following information about the resource:

  • A list of the attributes of the resource and their values.

  • A list of the methods and method parameters that the resource supports. Each method and its parameters are presented as a field of the appropriate type in an HTML form.

  • A list of hypertext links to the children of the resource.

  • A list of hypertext links to resources that represent asadmin subcommands for non-CRUD operations on the resource.

For a sample web page, see Figure 2-1 Web Page for the REST Resource for Managing a Domain. In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848. The URL to the resource in this example is http://localhost:4848/management/domain/nodes/node/sj01.

Formats for Resource Representation of Monitoring Objects

The Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces represent resources for monitoring data in the following formats:

JSON Resource Representation for Monitoring Objects

The general format for the JSON representation of a resource for a monitoring object is as follows:

{
  "message":"",
  "command":"Monitoring Data",
  "exit_code":"code",
  "extraProperties":{
    "entity":{
      statistics-list
    },
    "childResources":{
      children
    }
  }
}

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

code

The result of the attempt to get the resource.

statistics-list

Zero or more metadata sets separated by a comma (,) that represent the statistics that the monitoring object provides. For the format of each metadata set, see JSON Representation of a Statistic in a Statistics List.

children

Zero or more child resources separated by a comma (,). Each child resource is specified as "resource-name":"url".

resource-name

The name of the resource as displayed in client applications that access the parent of the resource.

url

The URL to the child resource.

JSON Representation of a Statistic in a Statistics List

The JSON representation of a counter statistic in a statistics list is as follows:

"statistic":{
  "count":count,
  "lastsampletime":last-sample-time,
  "description":"description",
  "unit":"unit",
  "name":"name",
  "starttime":start-time
}

The JSON representation of a range statistic in a statistics list is as follows:

"statistic":{
  "highwatermark":highest-value,
  "lowwatermark":lowest-value,
  "current":current-value
  "lastsampletime":last-sample-time,
  "description":"description",
  "unit":"unit",
  "name":"name",
  "starttime":start-time
}

The replaceable items in these formats are as follows:

statistic

The name of the statistic.

count

Counter statistics only: The current value of the statistic.

highest-value

Range statistics only: The highest value of the statistic since monitoring of the statistic began.

lowest-value

Range statistics only: The lowest value of the statistic since monitoring of the statistic began.

current-value

Range statistics only: The lowest value of the statistic since monitoring of the statistic began.

last-sample-time

The time in UNIX time at which the statistic was last sampled.

description

A textual description of what the statistic represents.

unit

The unit of measurement of the statistic, which is one of the following units of measurement:

count

The cumulative value of an attribute that increases with time.

range

The lowest value, highest value, and current value of an attribute that can increase or decrease with time.

boundedrange

The lowest value, highest value, and current value of an attribute that can increase or decrease with time and has fixed limits.

string

A string that represents an attribute value. A string statistic is similar to a count, except that the values are not ordered. Typically, a string statistic represents the state of an object, for example, CONNECTED, CLOSED, or DISCONNECTED.

time

Values of an attribute that provide the following timing measurements for an operation:

  • The number of times the operation was performed.

  • The maximum amount of time to perform the operation once.

  • The minimum amount of time to perform the operation once.

  • The total amount of time that has been spent performing the operation.

  • The average amount of time to perform the operation.

name

The name of the statistic as displayed in client applications that access the resource that contains the statistic.

start-time

The time in UNIX time at which monitoring of the statistic began.

Example JSON Resource Representation for a Monitoring Object

This example shows the JSON representation of the monitoring object that provides class loader statistics for the virtual machine for the Java platform. In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848. The URL to the resource in this example is http://localhost:4848/monitoring/domain/server/jvm/class-loading-system.

Line breaks and white space are added to enhance readability.

{
  "message":"",
  "command":"Monitoring Data",
  "exit_code":"SUCCESS",
  "extraProperties":{
    "entity":{
      "loadedclass-count":{
        "count":8521,
        "lastsampletime":1300726961018,
        "description":"Number of classes currently loaded in the Java virtual
          machine",
        "unit":"count",
        "name":"LoadedClassCount",
        "starttime":1300483924126
      },
      "totalloadedclass-count":{
        "count":8682,
        "lastsampletime":1300726961018,
        "description":"Total number of classes that have been loaded since the
          Java virtual machine has started execution",
        "unit":"count",
        "name":"TotalLoadedClassCount",
        "starttime":1300483924127
      },
      "unloadedclass-count":{
        "count":161,
        "lastsampletime":1300726961018,
        "description":"Total number of classes unloaded since the Java virtual
          machine has started execution",
        "unit":"count",
        "name":"UnLoadedClassCount",
        "starttime":1300483924127
      }
    },"childResources":{}
  }
}
XML Resource Representation for Monitoring Objects

The general format for the XML representation of a resource for a monitoring object is as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<map>
 <entry key="extraProperties">
  <map>
   <entry key="entity">
    <map>
     statistics
    </map>
   </entry>
   <entry key="childResources">
    <map>
     children
    </map>
   </entry>
  </map>
 </entry>
 <entry key="message" value=""></entry>
 <entry key="exit_code" value="code"></entry>
 <entry key="command" value="Monitoring Data"></entry>
</map>

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

statistics

Zero or more XML elements that represent the statistics that the monitoring object provides. For the format of each element, see XML Representation of a Statistic.

children

Zero or more XML elements that represent the children of the resource. Each element is specified as follows:

<entry key="resource-name" value="url"></entry>
resource-name

The name of the resource as displayed in client applications that access the parent of the resource.

url

The URL to the child resource.

code

The result of the attempt to get the resource.

XML Representation of a Statistic

The XML representation of a counter statistic is as follows:

<entry key="statistic">
 <map>
 <entry key="unit" value="unit"></entry>
 <entry key="starttime">
   <number>start-time</number>
  </entry>
  <entry key="count">
   <number>count</number>
  </entry>
  <entry key="description" value="description"></entry>
  <entry key="name" value="name"></entry>
  <entry key="lastsampletime">
   <number>last-sample-time</number>
  </entry>
  </map>
</entry>

The XML representation of a range statistic is as follows:

<entry key="statistic">
 <map>
 <entry key="unit" value="unit"></entry>
 <entry key="starttime">
   <number>start-time</number>
  </entry>
  <entry key="highwatermark">
   <number>highest-value</number>
  </entry>
  <entry key="lowwatermark">
   <number>lowest-value</number>
  </entry>
  <entry key="current">
   <number>current-value</number>
  </entry>
  <entry key="description" value="description"></entry>
  <entry key="name" value="name"></entry>
  <entry key="lastsampletime">
   <number>last-sample-time</number>
  </entry>
  </map>
</entry>

The replaceable items in these formats are as follows:

statistic

The name of the statistic.

unit

The unit of measurement of the statistic, which is one of the following units of measurement:

count

The cumulative value of an attribute that increases with time.

range

The lowest value, highest value, and current value of an attribute that can increase or decrease with time.

boundedrange

The lowest value, highest value, and current value of an attribute that can increase or decrease with time and has fixed limits.

string

A string that represents an attribute value. A string statistic is similar to a count, except that the values are not ordered. Typically, a string statistic represents the state of an object, for example, CONNECTED, CLOSED, or DISCONNECTED.

time

Values of an attribute that provide the following timing measurements for an operation:

  • The number of times the operation was performed.

  • The maximum amount of time to perform the operation once.

  • The minimum amount of time to perform the operation once.

  • The total amount of time that has been spent performing the operation.

  • The average amount of time to perform the operation.

start-time

The in time in UNIX time at which monitoring of the statistic began.

count

Counter statistics only: The current value of the statistic.

highest-value

Range statistics only: The highest value of the statistic since monitoring of the statistic began.

lowest-value

Range statistics only: The lowest value of the statistic since monitoring of the statistic began.

current-value

Range statistics only: The lowest value of the statistic since monitoring of the statistic began.

description

A textual description of what the statistic represents.

name

The name of the statistic as displayed in client applications that access the resource that contains the statistic.

last-sample-time

The time in UNIX time at which the statistic was last sampled.

Example XML Resource Representation for a Monitoring Object

This example shows the XML representation of the monitoring object that provides class loader statistics for the virtual machine for the Java platform. In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848. The URL to the resource in this example is http://localhost:4848/monitoring/domain/server/jvm/class-loading-system.

Line breaks and white space are added to enhance readability.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
<map>
 <entry key="extraProperties">
  <map>
   <entry key="entity">
    <map>
     <entry key="unloadedclass-count">
      <map>
       <entry key="unit" value="count"/>
       <entry key="starttime">
        <number>1300483924127</number>
       </entry><entry key="count">
        <number>161</number>
       </entry>
       <entry key="description" value="Total number of classes unloaded since
        the Java virtual machine has started execution"/>
       <entry key="name" value="UnLoadedClassCount"/>
       <entry key="lastsampletime">
        <number>1300726989505</number>
       </entry>
      </map>
     </entry>
     <entry key="totalloadedclass-count">
      <map>
       <entry key="unit" value="count"/>
       <entry key="starttime">
        <number>1300483924127</number>
       </entry>
       <entry key="count">
         number>8682</number>
       </entry>
       <entry key="description" value="Total number of classes that have been
        loaded since the Java virtual machine has started execution"/>
       <entry key="name" value="TotalLoadedClassCount"/>
       <entry key="lastsampletime">
        <number>1300726989505</number>
       </entry>
      </map>
     </entry>
     <entry key="loadedclass-count">
      <map>
       <entry key="unit" value="count"/>
       <entry key="starttime">
        <number>1300483924126</number>
       </entry><entry key="count">
        <number>8521</number>
       </entry>
       <entry key="description" value="Number of classes currently loaded in
        the Java virtual machine"/>
       <entry key="name" value="LoadedClassCount"/>
       <entry key="lastsampletime">
        <number>1300726989505</number>
       </entry>
      </map>
     </entry>
    </map>
   </entry>
   <entry key="childResources">
    <map/>
   </entry>
  </map>
 </entry>
 <entry key="message" value=""/>
 <entry key="exit_code" value="SUCCESS"/>
 <entry key="command" value="Monitoring Data"/>
</map>
HTML Resource Representation for Monitoring Objects

The format for the HTML representation of a resource for a monitoring object is a web page that provides the following information about the resource:

  • A list of the statistics that the resource provides.

  • A list of hypertext links to the children of the resource.

The following figure shows the web page for the REST resource that provides class loader statistics for the virtual machine for the Java platform.

Figure 2-2 Web Page for the REST Resource That Provides Class Loader Statistics

Screen capture showing the web page for the REST resource that provides class loader statistics.

Formats for Resource Representation of Log File Details

The Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces represent resources for log file details in the following formats:

JSON Resource Representation for Log File Details

The general format for the JSON representation of a resource for log file details is as follows:

{
  "records": [
    record-list
  ]
}

The replaceable item in this format is the record-list, which is one or more metadata sets separated by a comma (,) that represent the log records in the log file. For the format of each metadata set, see JSON Representation of a Log Record in a Record List.

JSON Representation of a Log Record in a Record List

The JSON representation of a log record in a record list is as follows:

{
  "recordNumber":record-number,
  "loggedDateTimeInMS":logged-date,
  "loggedLevel":"log-level",
  "productName":"product-name",
  "loggerName":"logger-name",
  "nameValuePairs":"_ThreadID=thread-id;_ThreadName=thread-name;",
  "messageID":"message-id",
  "Message":"message-text"
}

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

record-number

A serial number in the form of a decimal integer that uniquely identifies the log record.

logged-date

time when the record was created - a number of milliseconds from the epoch of 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z.

log-level

The severity level of the message in the log record. For more information, see Setting Log Levels.

product-name

The application that created the log message, for example, GlassFish 7.0.

logger-name

The logger name, which is usually a fully qualified name of the Java class owning the logger class that created the log record. For detailed information how to get names of logger classes used in Eclipse GlassFish, see Listing Loggers.

thread-id

The numerical identifier of the thread that created the message.

thread-name

The name of the thread that created the message.

message-id

A unique identifier for the message. For messages from Eclipse GlassFish, this identifier consists of a module code and a numerical value, for example, CORE5004. All SEVERE and WARNING messages and some INFO messages from Eclipse GlassFish contain a message identifier. For more information, see the Eclipse GlassFish Error Message Reference.

message-text

The text of the log message.

Example JSON Resource Representation for Log File Details

This example shows the JSON representation of the resource for log file details. In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848. The URL to the resource in this example is http://localhost:4848/management/domain/view-log/details.

Line breaks and white space are added to enhance readability.

{
  "records": [
    {
      "recordNumber":475,
      "loggedDateTimeInMS":1300743782815,
      "loggedLevel":"INFO",
      "productName":"glassfish7",
      "loggerName":"org.glassfish.admingui",
      "nameValuePairs": "_ThreadID=25;_ThreadName=Thread-1;",
      "messageID":"",
      "Message":"Admin Console: Initializing Session Attributes..."
    },
    {
      "recordNumber":474,
      "loggedDateTimeInMS":1300728893368,
      "loggedLevel":"INFO",
      "productName":"glassfish7",
      "loggerName":"jakarta.enterprise.system.core.com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.adapter",
      "nameValuePairs":"_ThreadID=238;_ThreadName=Thread-1;",
      "messageID":"",
      "Message":"The Admin Console application is loaded."
    },
    {
      "recordNumber":473,
      "loggedDateTimeInMS":1300728893367,
      "loggedLevel":"INFO",
      "productName":"glassfish7",
      "loggerName":"jakarta.enterprise.system.core.com.sun.enterprise.v3.server",
      "nameValuePairs":"_ThreadID=238;_ThreadName=Thread-1;",
      "messageID":"CORE10010",
      "Message":" Loading application __admingui done in 40,063 ms"
    }
  ]
}
XML Resource Representation for Log File Details

The general format for the XML representation of a resource for log file details is as follows:

<records>
 records
 </records>

The replaceable item in this format is the records, which is one or more XML elements that represent the log records in the log file. For the format of each element, see XML Representation of a Log Record.

XML Representation of a Log Record

The XML representation of a log record is as follows:

<record loggedDateTimeInMS="logged-date" loggedLevel="log-level"
 loggerName="logger-class-name" messageID="message-id"
 nameValuePairs="_ThreadID=thread-id;_thread-name;" productName="product-name"
 recordNumber="record-number"/>

The replaceable items in this format are as follows:

logged-date

time when the record was created - a number of milliseconds from the epoch of 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z.

log-level

The severity level of the message in the log record. For more information, see Setting Log Levels.

logger-class-name

The fully qualified name of the Java class of the logger class that created the log message. Each component of Eclipse GlassFish provides its own logger class. For detailed information about the names of logger classes in Eclipse GlassFish, see Listing Loggers.

message-id

A unique identifier for the message. For messages from Eclipse GlassFish, this identifier consists of a module code and a numerical value, for example, CORE5004. All SEVERE and WARNING messages and some INFO messages from Eclipse GlassFish contain a message identifier. For more information, see the Eclipse GlassFish Error Message Reference.

thread-id

The numerical identifier of the thread that created the message.

thread-name

The name of the thread that created the message.

product-name

The application that created the log message, for example, GlassFish 7.0.

record-number

A serial number in the form of a decimal integer that uniquely identifies the log record.

Example XML Resource Representation for Log File Details

This example shows the XML representation of the resource for log file details. In this example, the DAS is running on the local host and the HTTP port for administration is 4848. The URL to the resource in this example is http://localhost:4848/management/domain/view-log/details.

Line breaks and white space are added to enhance readability.

<records>
 <record loggedDateTimeInMS="1300743782815" loggedLevel="INFO"
 loggerName="org.glassfish.admingui" messageID=""
 nameValuePairs="_ThreadID=25;_ThreadName=Thread-1;"
 productName="glassfish7" recordNumber="475"/>
 <record loggedDateTimeInMS="1300728893368" loggedLevel="INFO"
 loggerName="jakarta.enterprise.system.core.com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.adapter"
  messageID="" nameValuePairs="_ThreadID=238;_ThreadName=Thread-1;"
  productName="glassfish7" recordNumber="474"/>
 <record loggedDateTimeInMS="1300728893367" loggedLevel="INFO"
 loggerName="jakarta.enterprise.system.core.com.sun.enterprise.v3.server"
 messageid="core10010" nameValuePairs="_ThreadID=238;_ThreadName=Thread-1;"
 productName="glassfish7" recordNumber="473"/>
</records>

Supported Content Types in Requests to REST Resources

The Eclipse GlassFish REST interfaces support the following types in the content-type header of a client request:

How to specify the type in the content-type header depends on how you are sending the request. For example, if you are using the cURL utility, specify the type through the -H option as follows:

  • For JSON, specify -H "Content-type: application/json".

  • For XML, specify -H "Content-type: application/xml".

  • For form URL encoded, specify -H "Content-type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded".

3 Administering Domains

This chapter provides procedures for administering domains in the Eclipse GlassFish environment by using the asadmin command-line utility.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing the tasks in this chapter by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

About Administering Domains

A domain contains a group of Eclipse GlassFish instances that are administered together. Each domain has a domain administration server (DAS) that hosts administrative applications. These concepts are explained in more detail in the following sections:

Eclipse GlassFish Instances

A Eclipse GlassFish instance is a single Virtual Machine for the Java platform (Java Virtual Machine or JVM machine) on a single node in which Eclipse GlassFish is running. A node defines the host where the Eclipse GlassFish instance resides. The JVM machine must be compatible with the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Jakarta EE).

Eclipse GlassFish instances form the basis of an application deployment.

Whenever a domain is created, Eclipse GlassFish creates a default instance that is named server. If a single instance meets your requirements, you can use this instance for deploying applications without the need to administer Eclipse GlassFish instances explicitly. You administer the default instance when you administer its domain.

If you require multiple instances, you must administer the instances explicitly. For more information, see "Administering Eclipse GlassFish Instances" in Eclipse GlassFish High Availability Administration Guide.

For an instance, you can also create virtual servers. Virtual servers do not span instances. For many purposes, you can use virtual servers instead of multiple instances in operational deployments. Virtual servers enable you to offer, within a single instance, separate domain names, IP addresses, and some administration capabilities to organizations or individuals. To these users, a virtual server behaves like a dedicated web server, but without the hardware and basic web server maintenance.

For more information about virtual servers, see Administering Virtual Servers.

Domains for Administering Eclipse GlassFish

A domain is an administrative boundary that contains a group of Eclipse GlassFish instances that are administered together. Each instance can belong to only one domain. A domain provides a preconfigured runtime for user applications. Each domain has its own configuration data, log files, and application deployment areas that are independent of other domains. If the configuration is changed for one domain, the configurations of other domains are not affected.

Domains enable different organizations and administrators to share securely a single Eclipse GlassFish installation. Each organization or administrator can administer the instances in a single domain without affecting the instances in other domains.

At installation time, Eclipse GlassFish creates a default domain that is named domain1. After installation, you can create additional domains as necessary.

When a domain is created, you are prompted for the administration user name and password. If you accept the default, the user admin is created without password. To reset the administration password, see "To Change an Administration Password" in Eclipse GlassFish Security Guide.

Domain Administration Server (DAS)

The domain administration server (DAS) is a specially designated Eclipse GlassFish instance that hosts administrative applications. The DAS is similar to any other Eclipse GlassFish instance, except that the DAS has additional administration capabilities. The DAS authenticates the administrator, accepts requests from administration tools, and communicates with other instances in the domain to carry out the requests from administration tools.

Each domain has its own DAS with a unique administration port number. The default administration port is 4848, but a different port can be specified when a domain is created.

The DAS has the master copy of the configuration data for all instances in a domain. If an instance is destroyed, for example, because a host failed, the instance can be re-created from the data in the DAS.

The DAS is the default Eclipse GlassFish instance in a domain and is named server. If a single instance meets your requirements, you can use the DAS for deploying applications and for administering the domain.

The graphical Administration Console communicates with a specific DAS to administer the domain that is associated with the DAS. Each Administration Console session enables you to configure and manage only one domain. If you create multiple domains, you must start a separate Administration Console session to manage each domain.

Creating, Logging In To, and Deleting a Domain

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create a Domain

After installing Eclipse GlassFish and creating the default domain (domain1), you can create additional domains by using the local create-domain subcommand. This subcommand creates the configuration of a domain. Any user who has access to the asadmin utility on a given system can create a domain and store the domain configuration in a folder of choice. By default, the domain configuration is created in the default directory for domains. You can override this location to store the configuration elsewhere.

You are required to specify an administrative user when you create a domain, or you can accept the default login identity which is username admin with no password.

  1. Select a name for the domain that you are creating. You can verify that a name is not already in use by using the list-domains subcommand

  2. Create a domain by using the create-domain subcommand. Information about the options for this subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. Type an admin user name and password for the domain. To avoid setting up an admin login, you can accept the default admin, with no password. Pressing Return also selects the default.

Example 3-1 Creating a Domain

This example creates a domain named domain1 . When you type the command, you might be prompted for login information.

asadmin> create-domain --adminport 4848 domain1
Enter admin user name[Enter to accept default]>
Using port 4848 for Admin.
Default port 8080 for HTTP Instance is in use. Using 1161
Using default port 7676 for JMS.
Using default port 3700 for IIOP.
Using default port 8081 for HTTP_SSL.
Using default port 3820 for IIOP_SSL.
Using default port 3920 for IIOP_MUTUALAUTH.
Default port 8686 for JMX_ADMIN is in use. Using 1162
Distinguished Name of the self-signed X.509 Server Certificate is:
[CN=moonbeam.gateway.2wire.net,OU=GlassFish,O=Oracle Corp.,L=Redwood Shores,ST
California,C=US]
Domain domain1 created.
Command create-domain executed successfully.

To start the Administration Console in a browser, enter the URL in the following format:

http://hostname:5000

For this example, the domain’s log files, configuration files, and deployed applications now reside in the following directory:

domain-root-dir/mydomain

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-domain at the command line.

To Create a Domain From a Custom Template

A custom template enables you to customize the configuration of any domain that you create from the template.

  1. Create a domain to use as the basis for the template. For more information, see To Create a Domain.

  2. Use the asadmin utility or the Administration Console to configure the domain. Your configuration changes will be included in the template that you create from the domain.

  3. Copy the domain’s domain.xml file under a new name to the as-install/lib/templates directory. A domain’s domain.xml file is located in the domain-dir/config directory.

  4. In a plain text editor, edit the file that you copied to replace with tokens values that are to be substituted when a domain is created. Each token is identified as %%%token-name%%%, where token-name is

    one of the following names
    ADMIN_PORT

    Represents the port number of the HTTP port or the HTTPS port for administration. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • The value of the --adminport option

    • The value of the domain.adminPort property

    CONFIG_MODEL_NAME

    Represents the name of the configuration that is created for the domain that is being created. This token is replaced with the string server-config.

    DOMAIN_NAME

    Represents the name of the domain that is being created. This token is replaced with the operand of create-domain subcommand.

    HOST_NAME

    Represents the name of the host on which the domain is being created. This token is replaced with the fully qualified host name of the host where the domain is being created.

    HTTP_PORT

    Represents the port number of the port that is used to listen for HTTP requests. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • The value of the --instanceport option

    • A value that the create-domain subcommand calculates from the value of the --portbase option

    • The value of the domain.instancePort property

    HTTP_SSL_PORT

    Represents the port number of the port that is used to listen for secure HTTP requests. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • A value that the create-domain subcommand calculates from the value of the --portbase option

    • The value of the http.ssl.port property

    JAVA_DEBUGGER_PORT

    Represents the port number of the port that is used for connections to the Java Platform Debugger Architecture (JPDA) debugger. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • A value that the create-domain subcommand calculates from the value of the --portbase option

    • The value of the java.debugger.port property

    JMS_PROVIDER_PORT

    Represents the port number for the Java Message Service provider. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • A value that the create-domain subcommand calculates from the value of the --portbase option

    • The value of the jms.port property

    JMX_SYSTEM_CONNECTOR_PORT

    Represents the port number on which the JMX connector listens. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • A value that the create-domain subcommand calculates from the value of the --portbase option

    • The value of the domain.jmxPort property

    ORB_LISTENER_PORT

    Represents the port number of the port that is used for IIOP connections. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • A value that the create-domain subcommand calculates from the value of the --portbase option

    • The value of the orb.listener.port property

    ORB_MUTUALAUTH_PORT

    Represents the port number of the port that is used for secure IIOP connections with client authentication. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • A value that the create-domain subcommand calculates from the value of the --portbase option

    • The value of the orb.mutualauth.port property

    ORB_SSL_PORT

    Represents the port number of the port that is used for secure IIOP connections. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • A value that the create-domain subcommand calculates from the value of the --portbase option

    • The value of the orb.ssl.port property

    OSGI_SHELL_TELNET_PORT

    Represents the port number of the port that is used for connections to the Apache Felix Remote Shell. This shell uses the Felix shell service to interact with the OSGi module management subsystem. This token is replaced with one of the following values in the command to create a domain from the template:

    • A value that the create-domain subcommand calculates from the value of the --portbase option

    • The value of the osgi.shell.telnet.port property

    SERVER_ID

    Represents the name of the DAS for the domain that is being created. This token is replaced with the string server.

    For information about how these tokens are used in the default template, examine the as-install/lib/templates/domain.xml file.

  5. Create the domain that you want to be based on a custom template. In the command to create the domain, pass the name of file that you edited in the previous step as the --template option of the create-domain subcommand.

  6. Before starting the domain, verify that the domain’s domain.xml file is valid. Use the verify-domain-xml subcommand for this purpose. Information about the options for this subcommand is included in the subcommand’s help page.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommands by typing the following commands at the command line.

  • asadmin help create-domain

  • asadmin help verify-domain-xml

To List Domains

Use the list-domains subcommand to display a list of domains and their statuses. If the domain directory is not specified, the contents of the domain-root-dir, the default for which is as-install/domains, is listed. If there is more than one domain, the domain name must be specified.

To list domains that were created in other directories, specify the --domaindir option.

List domains by using the list-domains subcommand.

Example 3-2 Listing Domains

This example lists the domains in the default domain root directory:

asadmin> list-domains
Name: domain1 Status: Running
Name: domain4 Status: Not Running
Name: domain6 Status: Not Running
Command list-domains executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-domain at the command line.

To Log In to a Domain

All remote subcommands require that credentials be specified in terms of an administration user name and its password. By default, the domain is created with an identity that allows an asadmin user to perform administrative operations when no identity is explicitly or implicitly specified.

The default identity is in the form of a user whose name is admin and has no password. If you specify no user name on the command line or on prompt, and specify no password in the --passwordfile option or on prompt, and you have never logged in to a domain using either the login subcommand or the create-domain subcommand with the --savelogin option, then the asadmin utility will attempt to perform a given administrative operation without specifying any identity.

A server (domain) allows administrative operations to be run using this default identity if the following conditions are true:

  • The server (domain) uses file realm for authentication of administrative users. If this condition is not true, you will need to specify the user name and password.

  • The file realm has one and only one user (what the user name is does not matter). If this condition is not true, you will also need to specify the user name.

  • That one user has no password. If this condition is not true, you will need to specify the password.

By default, all of these conditions are true, unless you have created the domain with a specific user name and password. Thus, by default, the only administrative user is admin with no password.

Use the login subcommand in local mode to authenticate yourself (log in to) a specific domain. After such login, you do not need to specify the administration user or password for subsequent operations on the domain. The login subcommand can only be used to specify the administration password. For other passwords that remote subcommands require, use the --passwordfile option, or specify the password at the command prompt. You are always prompted for the administration user name and password.

There is no logout subcommand. If you want to log in to another domain, invoke asadmin login with new values for --host and --port.

  1. Determine the name of the domain that you are logging in to. To list the existing domains:

    asadmin list-domains
  2. Log in to the domain by using the ologin command.

Example 3-3 Logging In To a Domain on a Remote Machine

This example logs into a domain located on another machine. Options are specified before the login subcommand.

asadmin> --host foo --port 8282 login
Please enter the admin user name>admin Please enter the admin password>
Trying to authenticate for administration of server at host [foo] and port [8282] ...
Login information relevant to admin user name [admin]
for host [foo] and admin port [8282] stored at [/.asadminpass] successfully.
Make sure that this file remains protected. Information stored in this
file will be used by asadmin commands to manage associated domain.

Example 3-4 Logging In to a Domain on the Default Port of Localhost

This example logs into a domain on myhost on the default port. Options are specified before the login subcommand.

asadmin> --host myhost login
Please enter the admin user name>admin
Please enter the admin password>
Trying to authenticate for administration of server at host [myhost] and port [4848] ...
An entry for login exists for host [myhost] and port [4848], probably from
an earlier login operation.
Do you want to overwrite this entry (y/n)?y
Login information relevant to admin user name [admin] for host [myhost]
and admin port [4848] stored at [/home/joe/.asadminpass] successfully.
Make sure that this file remains protected. Information stored in this file will be used by
asadmin commands to manage associated domain.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help login at the command line. For additional information about passwords, see "Administering Passwords" in Eclipse GlassFish Security Guide.

To Delete a Domain

Use the delete-domain subcommand to delete an existing domain from a server. Only the root user or the operating system user who is authorized to administer the domain can run this subcommand.

Before You Begin

A domain must be stopped before it can be deleted.

  1. List domains by using the list-domains subcommand.

  2. If necessary, notify domain users that the domain is being deleted.

  3. Ensure that the domain you want to delete is stopped. If needed, see To Stop a Domain.

  4. Delete the domain by using the delete-domain subcommand.

Example 3-5 Deleting a Domain

This example deletes a domain named domain1 from the location specified.

asadmin> delete-domain --domaindir ..\domains domain1
Domain domain1 deleted.
Command delete-domain executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-domain at the command line.

Starting and Stopping a Domain

The following topics are addressed here:

To Start a Domain

When you start a domain or server, the domain administration server (DAS) is started. After startup, the DAS runs constantly, listening for and accepting requests.

If the domain directory is not specified, the domain in the default domain root directory is started. If there are two or more domains, the domain_name operand must be specified. Each domain must be started separately.

For Microsoft Windows, you can use an alternate method to start a domain. From the Windows Start menu, select the command for your distribution of Eclipse GlassFish:

  • If you are using the Full Platform, select Programs > Eclipse GlassFish > Start Admin Server.

  • If you are using the Web Profile, select Programs > Eclipse GlassFish Web Profile > Start Admin Server.

This subcommand is supported in local mode only.

Start a domain by using the start-domain subcommand.

Example 3-6 Starting a Domain

This example starts domain2 in the default domain directory.

asadmin> start-domain domain2

If there is only one domain, you can omit the domain name. If you do not include the password, you might be prompted to supply it.

Name of the domain started: [domain1] and its location:
[C:\prelude\v3_prelude_release\distributions\web\target\glassfish
domains\domain1].
Admin port for the domain: [4848].

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help start-domain at the command line.

To Stop a Domain

Stopping a domain or server shuts down its domain administration server (DAS). When stopping a domain, the DAS stops accepting new connections and then waits for all outstanding connections to complete. This shutdown process takes a few seconds. While the domain is stopped, the Administration Console and most of the asadmin subcommands cannot be used. This subcommand is particularly useful in stopping a runaway server. For more controlled situations, you can use the restart-domain subcommand.

For Microsoft Windows, you can use an alternate method to stop a domain. From the Start menu, select the command for your distribution of Eclipse GlassFish:

  • If you are using the Full Platform, select Programs > Eclipse GlassFish > Stop Admin Server.

  • If you are using the Web Profile, select Programs > Eclipse GlassFish Web Profile > Stop Admin Server.

  1. If necessary, notify users that you are going to stop the domain.

  2. Stop the domain by using the stop-domain subcommand.

Example 3-7 Stopping a Domain (or Server)

This example stops domain1 in the default directory, where domain1 is the only domain present in the directory.

asadmin> stop-domain
Waiting for the domain to stop ...........
Command stop-domain executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help stop-domain at the command line.

To Restart a Domain

Use the restart-domain subcommand in remote mode to restart the Domain Administration Server (DAS) of the specified host. When restarting a domain, the DAS stops accepting new connections and then waits for all outstanding connections to complete. This shutdown process takes a few seconds. Until the domain has restarted, the Administration Console and most of the asadmin subcommands cannot be used.

This subcommand is particularly useful for environments where the server machine is secured and difficult to get to. With the right credentials, you can restart the server from a remote location as well as from the same machine.

If the server will not restart, use the stop-domain subcommand followed by the start-domain subcommand.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Restart the domain by using the restart-domain subcommand.

Example 3-8 Restarting a Domain (or Server)

This example restarts mydoimain4 in the default directory.

asadmin> restart-domain mydomain4
Waiting for the domain to restart ...........
Command restart-domain executed successfully.

Example 3-9 Restarting a Domain in a Browser

This example invokes the restart-domain subcommand in a browser.

http://yourhost:4848/__asadmin/restart-domain

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help restart-domain at the command line.

Configuring a DAS or a Eclipse GlassFish Instance for Automatic Restart

Use the create-service subcommand in local mode to configure your system to automatically restart a domain administration server (DAS) or a Eclipse GlassFish instance. Eclipse GlassFish enables you to configure a DAS or an instance for automatic restart on the following operating systems:

  • Windows

  • Linux

  • Oracle Solaris

To ensure that automatic restart functions correctly on Windows, you must prevent service shutdown when a user logs out.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Configure a DAS or an Instance for Automatic Restart on Windows

On Windows systems, the create-service subcommand creates a Windows service to represent the DAS or instance. The service is created in the disabled state. After this subcommand creates the service, you must use the Windows Services Manager or the Windows Services Wrapper to start, stop, uninstall, or install the service. To administer the service from the Windows command line, use the sc.exe tool.

This subcommand must be run as the OS-level administrator user.

  1. Create the service by using the create-service subcommand.

  2. After the service is created, start the service by using the Windows Services Manager or the Windows Services Wrapper.

    For example, to start the service for the default domain by using the sc.exe tool, type:

    C:\> sc start domain1

    If you are using the sc.exe tool to administer the service, use the tool as follows:

    • To obtain information about the service, use the sc query command.

    • To stop the service, use the sc stop command.

    • To uninstall the service, use the sc delete command.

Example 3-10 Creating a Service to Restart a DAS Automatically on Windows

This example creates a service for the default domain on a system that is running Windows.

asadmin> create-service
Found the Windows Service and successfully uninstalled it.
The Windows Service was created successfully.  It is ready to be started.  Here are
the details:
ID of the service: domain1
Display Name of the service:domain1 Eclipse GlassFish
Domain Directory: C:\glassfish7\glassfish\domains\domain1
Configuration file for Windows Services Wrapper: C:\glassfish7\glassfish\domains\
domain1\bin\domain1Service.xml
The service can be controlled using the Windows Services Manager or you can use the
Windows Services Wrapper instead:
Start Command:  C:\glassfish7\glassfish\domains\domain1\bin\domain1Service.exe  start
Stop Command:   C:\glassfish7\glassfish\domains\domain1\bin\domain1Service.exe  stop
Uninstall Command:  C:\glassfish7\glassfish\domains\domain1\bin\domain1Service.exe
uninstall
Install Command:  C:\glassfish7\glassfish\domains\domain1\bin\domain1Service.exe
install

This message is also available in a file named PlatformServices.log in the domain's
root directory
Command create-service executed successfully.

Example 3-11 Querying the Service to Restart a DAS Automatically on Windows

This obtains information about the service for the default domain on a system that is running Windows.

C:\> sc query domain1

SERVICE_NAME: domain1
        TYPE               : 10  WIN32_OWN_PROCESS
        STATE              : 1  STOPPED
        WIN32_EXIT_CODE    : 1077  (0x435)
        SERVICE_EXIT_CODE  : 0  (0x0)
        CHECKPOINT         : 0x0
        WAIT_HINT          : 0x0

To Configure a DAS or an Instance for Automatic Restart on Linux

On Linux systems, the create-service subcommand creates a System-V-style initialization script /etc/init.d/GlassFish_`domain-or-instance-name and installs a link to this script in any `/etc/rc`N.d` directory that is present, where N is 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and S. After this subcommand creates the script, you must use this script to start, stop, or restart the domain or instance.

The script automatically restarts the domain or instance only during a reboot. If the domain or instance is stopped, but the host remains running, the domain or instance is not restarted automatically. To restart the domain or instance, you must run the script manually.

You might no longer require the domain or instance to be automatically restarted during a reboot. In this situation, use the operating system to delete the initialization script and the link to the script that the create-service subcommand creates.

The create-service subcommand must be run as the OS-level root user.

Create the service by using the create-service subcommand.

Example 3-12 Creating a Service to Restart a DAS Automatically on Linux

This example creates a service for the default domain on a system that is running Linux.

asadmin> create-service
Found the Linux Service and successfully uninstalled it.
The Service was created successfully. Here are the details:
Name of the service:domain1
Type of the service:Domain
Configuration location of the service:/etc/init.d/GlassFish_domain1
User account that will run the service: root
You have created the service but you need to start it yourself.
Here are the most typical Linux commands of interest:

* /etc/init.d/GlassFish_domain1 start
* /etc/init.d/GlassFish_domain1 stop
* /etc/init.d/GlassFish_domain1 restart

For your convenience this message has also been saved to this file:
/export/glassfish7/glassfish/domains/domain1/PlatformServices.log
Command create-service executed successfully.

To Configure a DAS or an Instance for Automatic Restart on Oracle Solaris

On Oracle Solaris systems, the create-service subcommand creates an Oracle Solaris Service Management Facility (SMF) service that restarts a DAS or an instance. The service grants to the process the privileges of the user that runs the process. When you create an SMF service, the default user is the superuser. If you require a different user to run the process, specify the user in method_credential.

If your process is to bind to a privileged port of Oracle Solaris, the process requires the net_privaddr privilege. The privileged ports of the Oracle Solaris operating system have port numbers less than 1024.

To determine if a user has the net_privaddr privilege, log in as that user and type the command ppriv -l | grep net_privaddr.

After you create and enable the SMF service, if the domain or instance is stopped, SMF restarts it.

Before You Begin

To run the create-service subcommand, you must have solaris.smf.* authorization. For information about how to set the authorizations, see the useradd(1M) man page and the usermod(1M) man page. You must also have write permission in the directory tree: /var/svc/manifest/application/SUNWappserver. Usually, the superuser has both of these permissions. Additionally, Oracle Solaris administration commands such as svccfg, svcs, and auths must be available in the PATH.

If a particular Eclipse GlassFish domain or instance should not have default user privileges, modify the manifest of the service and reimport the service.

  1. Create the service by using the create-service subcommand.

  2. After the service is created, enable the service by using the svacdm enable command.

    For example, to enable the SMF service for the default domain, type:

    svacdm enable /appserver/domains/domain1

Example 3-13 Creating a Service to Restart a Domain Automatically on Oracle Solaris

This example creates a service for the default domain on a system that is running Oracle Solaris.

asadmin> create-service
The Service was created successfully. Here are the details:
Name of the service:application/GlassFish/domain1
Type of the service:Domain
Configuration location of the service:/home/gfuser/glassfish-installations
/glassfish7/glassfish/domains
Manifest file location on the system:/var/svc/manifest/application
/GlassFish/domain1_home_gfuser_glassfish-installations_glassfish7
_glassfish_domains/Domain-service-smf.xml.
You have created the service but you need to start it yourself.
Here are the most typical Solaris commands of interest:
* /usr/bin/svcs -a | grep domain1 // status
* /usr/sbin/svcadm enable domain1 // start
* /usr/sbin/svcadm disable domain1 // stop
* /usr/sbin/svccfg delete domain1 // uninstall
Command create-service executed successfully

See Also

For information about administering the service, see the following Oracle Solaris documentation:

To Prevent Service Shutdown When a User Logs Out on Windows

By default, the Java Virtual Machine (VM) receives signals from Windows that indicate that Windows is shutting down, or that a user is logging out of Windows, which causes the system to shut itself down cleanly. This behavior causes the Eclipse GlassFish service to shut down. To prevent the service from shutting down when a user logs out, you must set the -Xrs Java VM option (https://github.com/eclipse-ee4j/glassfishdocumentation).

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running.

  2. Set the -Xrs Java VM option for the DAS. Use the create-jvm-options subcommand for this purpose.

    asadmin> create-jvm-options -Xrs
  3. Set the -Xrs Java VM option for the Java VM within which the asadmin utility runs. To set this option, edit the asadmin.bat file to add the -Xrs option to the line that runs the admin-cli.jar file.

    1. In the as-install\bin\asadmin.bat file, edit the line to read as follows:

      %JAVA% -Xrs -jar "%~dp0..\modules\admin-cli.jar" %*
    2. In the as-install-parent\bin\asadmin.bat file, edit the line to read as follows:

      %JAVA% -Xrs -jar "%~dp0..\glassfish\modules\admin-cli.jar" %*
  4. If the Eclipse GlassFish service is running, restart the service for your changes to take effect.

Backing Up and Restoring a Domain

The following topics are addressed here:

To Back Up a Domain

Use the backup-domain subcommand in local mode to make a backup of a specified domain.

When you use the backup-domain subcommand, Eclipse GlassFish creates a ZIP file backup of all the files and subdirectories in the domain’s directory, domain-root-dir/domain-dir, except for the backups subdirectory.

The backup-domain subcommand provides several options to meet particular needs, including:

  • --backupdir to specify a directory in which to store the backup instead of the default domain-root-dir/domain-dir/backups.

  • --description to provide a description of the backup to be stored in the backup itself.

    1. Ensure that the domain is stopped .

      The backup-domain subcommand operates only when the domain is stopped.

    2. Back up the domain by using the backup-domain subcommand.

    3. Restore the domain to its previous state, if necessary.

      Start or resume the domain.

Example 3-14 Backing Up the Default Domain

This example makes a backup of the default domain, domain1, storing the backup file in /net/backups.example.com/glassfish:

asadmin> backup-domain --backupdir /net/backups.example.com/glassfish domain1
Backed up domain1 at Mon Jan 17 08:16:22 PST 2011.
Command backup-domain executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help backup-domain at the command line.

To Restore a Domain

Use the restore-domain subcommand in local mode to use a backup file to restore the files and subdirectories in a specified domain’s directory.

The restore-domain subcommand can use backup files created by the backup-domain subcommand and by automatic backup configurations, both full backups and configuration-only backups. Automatic backup configurations are available only in Eclipse GlassFish.

  1. If necessary, notify domain users that the domain is being restored from backup.

  2. Ensure that the domain is stopped.

    The restore-domain subcommand operates only when the domain is stopped.

    To determine whether the domain is running, use the list-domains subcommand, as described in To List Domains.

    To stop the domain, use the stop-domain subcommand as described in To Stop a Domain.

  3. Restore backup files for a domain by using the restore-domain subcommand.

  4. Verify that the restore has succeeded.

  5. If necessary, notify users that the domain has been restored and is available.

Example 3-15 Restoring the Default Domain

This example restores files for the default domain, domain1, from the most recent backup stored in a specified backup directory:

asadmin> restore-domain --backupdir /net/backups.example.com/glassfish domain1
Restored the domain (domain1) to /home/user1/glassfish7/glassfish/domains/domain1
Command restore-domain executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin restore-domain --help at the command line.

To List Domain Backups

Use the list-backups subcommand in local mode to display information about backups of a specified domain stored in a specified backup directory.

The list-backups subcommand provides several options to meet particular needs, including --backupdir to specify a directory where backups are stored instead of the default domain-dir/backups.

List backups by using the list-backups subcommand.

Example 3-16 Listing Backups of the Default Domain

This example lists the backups of the default domain, domain1, that are stored in the /net/backups.example.com/glassfish directory:

asadmin> list-backups --backupdir /net/backups.example.com/glassfish domain1
CONFIG        USER   BACKUP DATE                   FILENAME
              user1  Mon Jan 17 08:16:22 PST 2011  domain1_2011_01_17_v00001.zip
monthly-full  user1  Wed Dec 01 00:00:00 PST 2010  domain1_2010_12_01_v00001.zip
monthly-full  user1  Sat Jan 01 00:00:03 PST 2011  domain1_2011_01_01_v00001.zip
monthly-full  user1  Tue Feb 01 00:00:01 PST 2011  domain1_2011_02_01_v00001.zip
Command list-backups executed successfully.

Note that this listing includes backups created automatically by a backup configuration. This feature is available only in Eclipse GlassFish.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-backups at the command line.

Re-Creating the Domain Administration Server (DAS)

For mirroring purposes, and to provide a working copy of the DAS, you must have:

  • One host (olddashost) that contains the original DAS.

  • A second host (apphost) that contains a cluster with server instances running applications and catering to clients. The cluster is configured using the DAS on the first host.

  • A third host (newdashost) where the DAS needs to be re-created in a situation where the first host crashes or is being taken out of service.

You must maintain a backup of the DAS from the first host using the obackup-domain subcommand as described in To Back Up a Domain. You can automatically maintain a backup of the DAS using the automatic backups feature of Eclipse GlassFish.

Eclipse GlassFish includes asadmin subcommands that simplify this procedure. If you are using Eclipse GlassFish, see To Migrate the DAS.

To Migrate the DAS

The following steps are required to migrate the DAS from the first host (olddashost) to the third host (newdashost).

  1. Install Eclipse GlassFish on newdashost just as it was installed on olddashost. This is required so that the DAS can be properly restored on newdashost without causing path conflicts.

  2. Use the restore-domain subcommand to restore the latest backup file onto newdashost. For example:

    asadmin> restore-domain --backupdir /net/backups.example.com/glassfish

    This example assumes that backups are stored in a network-accessible location. If this is not the case, manually copy the latest backup file from offline storage to a directory on newdashost. You can backup any domain. However, while re-creating the domain, the domain name should be same as the original.

  3. Stop the domain on olddashost, if it is running.

  4. Start the domain on newdashost by using the start-domain subcommand. For example:

    asadmin> start-domain domain1
  5. If the domain on olddashost was centrally administered, set up centralized administration on newdashost. See "Enabling Centralized Administration of Eclipse GlassFish Instances" in Eclipse GlassFish High Availability Administration Guide for instructions.

  6. Verify that instances on other hosts are visible to the new DAS on newdashost:

    asadmin> list-instances --long
  7. Change the DAS host values for properties under the node on apphost. In the file as-install/nodes/node-name/agent/config/das.properties file, change the agent.das.host property value to refer to newdashost instead of olddasnost.

  8. Use the new DAS to restart clusters and standalone instances on apphost: Restarting the clustered and standalone instances on apphost triggers their recognition of the new DAS on newdashost.

    1. Use the list-clusters subcommand to list the clusters in the domain.

    2. Use the stop-cluster subcommand to stop each cluster.

    3. Use the list-instances subcommand to list the instances in the domain.

    4. Use the restart-instance subcommand to restart each standalone instance.

    5. Use the start-cluster subcommand to start each cluster. If the domain does not use centralized administration, use the start-local-instance subcommand to start the cluster instances on apphost.

  9. Verify that instances on apphost are running:

    asadmin> list-instances --long
  10. Decommission and discontinue use of the DAS on olddashost.

Additional Domain Tasks

The following topics are addressed here:

To Display Domain Uptime

Use the uptime subcommand in remote mode to display the length of time that the domain administration server (DAS) has been running since it was last started.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Display uptime by using the uptime subcommand.

Example 3-17 Displaying the DAS Uptime

This example displays the length of time that the DAS has been running.

asadmin> uptime
Uptime: 1 Weeks, 4 days, 0 hours, 17 minutes, 14 seconds, Total milliseconds: 951434595
Command uptime executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help uptime at the command line.

To Switch a Domain to Another Supported Java Version

Eclipse GlassFish 7 requires Java SE 11 as the underlying virtual machine for the Java platform (Java Virtual Machine or JVM machine).

Do not downgrade to an earlier Java version after a domain has been created with a newer JVM machine. If you must downgrade your JVM machine, downgrade it only for individual domains.

  1. If you have not already done so, download the desired Java SDK (not the JRE) and install it on your system. The Java SDK can be downloaded from the Java SE RI Downloads page .

  2. Start the domain for which you are changing the JDK. Use the following format:

    as-install/bin/asadmin start-domain domain-name

For a valid JVM installation, locations are checked in the following order:

  1. domain.xml (java-home inside java-config)

  2. asenv.conf (setting AS_JAVA="path to java home") If a legal JDK is not found, a fatal error occurs and the problem is reported back to you.

  3. If necessary, change the JVM machine attributes for the domain. In particular, you might need to change the JAVA_HOME environment variable. For example, to change the JAVA_HOME variable, type:

    as-install/bin/asadmin set "server.java-config.java-home=path-to-java-home"

To Change the Administration Port of a Domain

Use the set subcommand in remote mode to change the administration port of a domain.

The HTTP port or the HTTPS port for administration of a domain is defined by the --adminport option of the create-domain subcommand when the domain is created. If this port must be reallocated for another purpose, change the port on which the DAS listens for administration requests.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Set the port number to its new value. Use the set subcommand for this purpose.

    $ asadmin set
    server-config.network-config.network-listeners.network-listener.admin-listener.port=new-port-number

    The new-port-number is the new value that you are setting for the port number.

    After you set the port number to its new value, running the list-domains subcommand incorrectly reports that the DAS is not running. The list-domains subcommand reports the correct state again only after you stop and restart the domain as explained in the steps that follow.

  3. Stop the domain, specifying the host on which the DAS is running and the old administration port number of the domain. You must specify the old port number because the DAS is still listening for administration requests on this port. If you omit the port number, the command fails because the stop-domain subcommand attempts to contact the DAS through the new port number.

    Only the options that are required to complete this task are provided in this step. For information about all the options for controlling the behavior of the domain, see the ostop-domain(1) help page.

    $ asadmin --host host-name --port old-port-number stop-domain
    host-name

    The name of the host on which the DAS is running. If you run the stop-domain subcommand on the host where the DAS is running, you must specify the actual host name and not localhost. If you specify localhost, the stop-domain subcommand fails.

    old-port-number

    The value of administration port number of the domain before you changed it in the preceding step.

  4. Start the domain.

    Only the options that are required to complete this task are provided in this step. For information about all the options for controlling the behavior of the domain, see the ostart-domain(1) help page.

    $ start-domain [domain-name]

    The domain-name is the name of the domain to start. If only one domain subdirectory is contained in the domains directory, you may omit this option.

Example 3-18 Changing the Administration Port of a Domain

This example changes the administration port of the domain domain1 from 4848 to 4849. The DAS is running on the host xk01.example.com.

$ asadmin set
server-config.network-config.network-listeners.network-listener.admin-listener.port=4849
server-config.network-config.network-listeners.network-listener.admin-listener.port=4849
Command set executed successfully.
$ asadmin --host xk01.example.com --port 4848 stop-domain
Waiting for the domain to stop ....
Command stop-domain executed successfully.
$ asadmin start-domain
Waiting for domain1 to start ........................
Successfully started the domain : domain1
domain  Location: /export/glassfish7/glassfish/domains/domain1
Log File: /export/glassfish7/glassfish/domains/domain1/logs/server.log
Admin Port: 4849
Command start-domain executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommands by typing the following commands at the command line:

  • asadmin help create-domain

  • asadmin help set

  • asadmin help start-domain

  • asadmin help stop-domain

4 Administering the Virtual Machine for the Java Platform

This chapter provides procedures for administering the Virtual Machine for the Java platform (Java Virtual Machine) or JVM machine) in the Eclipse GlassFish 7 environment by using the asadmin command-line utility.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing these tasks by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

Administering JVM Options

The Java Virtual Machine is an interpretive computing engine responsible for running the byte codes in a compiled Java program. The virtual machine translates the Java byte codes into the native instructions of the host machine. Eclipse GlassFish, being a Java process, requires a virtual machine to run and support the Java applications running on it. JVM settings are part of an Eclipse GlassFish configuration.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create JVM Options

Use the create-jvm-options subcommand in remote mode to create JVM options in the Java configuration or the profiler elements of the domain.xml file. If JVM options are created for a profiler, these options are used to record the settings that initiate the profiler.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create JVM options by using the create-jvm-options subcommand.

    To create more than one JVM option, use a colon (:) to separate the options. If the JVM option itself contains a colon (:), use the backslash (\) to offset the colon delimiter.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish. See To Restart a Domain.

Example 4-1 Creating JVM Options

This example sets multiple Java system properties.

asadmin> create-jvm-options -Dunixlocation=/root/example:
-Dvariable=\$HOME:
-Dwindowslocation=d\\:\\\sun\\\appserver:
-Doption1=-value1
created 4 option(s)
Command create-jvm-options executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-jvm-options at the command line.

To List JVM Options

Use the list-jvm-options subcommand in remote mode to list the existing JVM options.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List JVM options by using the list-jvm-options subcommand.

Example 4-2 Listing JVM Options

This example lists all JVM options.

asadmin> list-jvm-options
-Djava.security.auth.login.config=${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/config/login.conf
-XX: LogVMOutput
-XX: UnlockDiagnosticVMOptions
-Dcom.sun.enterprise.config.config_environment_factory_class=com.sun.enterprise.
config.serverbeans.AppserverConfigEnvironmentFactory
-Djavax.net.ssl.keyStore=${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/config/keystore.jks
-XX:NewRatio=2
-Djava.security.policy=${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/config/server.policy
-Djdbc.drivers=org.apache.derby.jdbc.ClientDriver
-Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/config/cacerts.jks
-client
-Djava.ext.dirs=${com.sun.aas.javaRoot}/lib/ext${path.separator}${com.sun.aas.ja
vaRoot}/jre/lib/ext${path.separator}${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/lib/ext${path.se
parator}${com.sun.aas.derbyRoot}/lib
-Xmx512m
-XX:LogFile=${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/jvm.log
Command list-jvm-options executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-jvm-options at the command line.

To Delete JVM Options

Use the delete-jvm-options subcommand in remote mode to delete JVM options from the Java configuration or profiler elements of the domain.xml file.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List JVM options by using the list-jvm-options subcommand.

  3. If necessary, notify users that the JVM option is being deleted.

  4. Delete JVM options by using the delete-jvm-options subcommand.

    To remove more than one JVM option, use a colon (:) to separate the options. If the JVM option itself contains a colon, use the backslash (\) to offset the colon delimiter.

  5. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish. See To Restart a Domain.

Example 4-3 Deleting a JVM Option

This example removes a single JVM option.

asadmin> delete-jvm-options -Dopt1=A

deleted 1 option(s)
Command delete-jvm-options executed successfully.

Example 4-4 Deleting Multiple JVM Options

This example removes multiple JVM options.

asadmin> delete-jvm-options -Doption1=-value1:-Dvariable=\$HOME
deleted 2 option(s)
Command delete-jvm-options executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-jvm-options at the command line.

To Generate a JVM Report

Use the generate-jvm-report subcommand in remote mode to generate a JVM report showing the threads (dump of a stack trace), classes, memory, and loggers for a specified instance, including the domain administration server (DAS). You can generate the following types of reports: summary (default), class, thread, log.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Generate the report by using the generate-jvm-report subcommand.

Example 4-5 Generating a JVM Report

This example displays summary information about the threads, classes, and memory.

asadmin> generate-jvm-report --type summary
Operating System Information:
Name of the Operating System: Windows XP
Binary Architecture name of the Operating System: x86, Version: 5.1
Number of processors available on the Operating System: 2
System load on the available processors for the last minute: NOT_AVAILABLE.
(Sum of running and queued runnable entities per minute).
.
,
.
user.home = C:\Documents and Settings\Jennifer
user.language = en
user.name = Jennifer
user.timezone = America/New_York
user.variant =
variable = \$HOME
web.home = C:\Preview\v3_Preview_release\distributions\web\target\
glassfish\modules\web
Command generate-jvm-report executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help generate-jvm-report at the command line.

Administering the Profiler

A profiler generates information used to analyze server performance.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create a Profiler

A server instance is tied to a particular profiler by the profiler element in the Java configuration. If JVM options are created for a profiler, the options are used to record the settings needed to activate a particular profiler. Use the create-profiler subcommand in remote mode to create the profiler element in the Java configuration.

Only one profiler can exist. If a profiler already exists, you receive an error message that directs you to delete the existing profiler before creating a new one.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create a profiler by using the create-profiler subcommand.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

Example 4-6 Creating a Profiler

This example creates a profiler named sample_profiler.

asadmin> create-profiler --classpath=/home/appserver/ --nativelibrarypath=/u/home/lib
--enabled=false --property=defaultuser=admin:password=adminadmin sample_profiler
Command create-profiler executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-profiler at the command line.

To Delete a Profiler

Use the delete-profiler subcommand in remote mode to delete the profiler element from the Java configuration. You can then create a new profiler.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Delete the profiler by using the delete-profiler subcommand.

  3. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

Example 4-7 Deleting a Profiler

This example deletes the profiler named sample_profiler.

asadmin> delete-profiler sample_profiler
Command delete-profiler executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-profiler at the command line.

5 Administering Thread Pools

This chapter provides procedures for administering thread pools in the Eclipse GlassFish 7 environment by using the asadmin command-line utility.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing these tasks by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

About Thread Pools

The Virtual Machine for the Java platform (Java Virtual Machine) or JVM machine) can support many threads of execution simultaneously. To help performance, Eclipse GlassFish maintains one or more thread pools. It is possible to assign specific thread pools to connector modules, to network listeners, or to the Object Request Broker (ORB).

One thread pool can serve multiple connector modules and enterprise beans. Request threads handle user requests for application components. When Eclipse GlassFish receives a request, it assigns the request to a free thread from the thread pool. The thread executes the client’s requests and returns results. For example, if the request needs to use a system resource that is currently busy, the thread waits until that resource is free before allowing the request to use that resource.

Configuring Thread Pools

You can specify the minimum and maximum number of threads that are reserved for requests from applications. The thread pool is dynamically adjusted between these two values.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create a Thread Pool

Use the create-threadpool subcommand in remote mode to create a thread pool.

The minimum thread pool size that is specified signals the server to allocate at least that many threads in reserve for application requests. That number is increased up to the maximum thread pool size that is specified. Increasing the number of threads available to a process allows the process to respond to more application requests simultaneously.

If one resource adapter or application occupies all the Eclipse GlassFish threads, thread starvation might occur. You can avoid this by dividing the Eclipse GlassFish threads into different thread pools.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create a new thread pool by using the create-threadpool subcommand.

    Information about options for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

    Restart is not necessary for thread pools used by the web container.

Example 5-1 Creating a Thread Pool

This example creates threadpool-l.

asadmin> create-threadpool --maxthreadpoolsize 100
--minthreadpoolsize 20 --idletimeout 2 --workqueues 100 threadpool-1
Command create-threadpool executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-threadpool at the command line.

To List Thread Pools

Use the list-threadpools subcommand in remote mode to list the existing thread pools.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the existing thread pools by using the list-threadpools subcommand.

Example 5-2 Listing Thread Pools

This example lists the existing thread pools.

asadmin> list-threadpools
threadpool-1
Command list-threadpools executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-threadpools at the command line.

To Update a Thread Pool

Use the set subcommand to update the values for a specified thread pool.

  1. List the existing thread pools by using the list-threadpools subcommand.

  2. Modify the values for a thread pool by using the set subcommand.

    The thread pool is identified by its dotted name.

  3. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

    Restart is not necessary for thread pools used by the web container.

Example 5-3 Updating a Thread Pool

This example sets the max-thread-pool-size from its previous value to 8. [source]

asadmin> set server.thread-pools.thread-pool.http-thread-pool.max-thread-pool-size=8
Command set executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set at the command line.

To Delete a Thread Pool

Use the delete-threadpool subcommand in remote mode to delete an existing thread pool. Deleting a thread pool will fail if that pool is referenced by a network listener.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the existing thread pools by using the list-threadpools subcommand.

  3. Delete the specified thread pool by using the delete-threadpool subcommand.

  4. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

    Restart is not necessary for thread pools used by the web container.

Example 5-4 Deleting a Thread Pool

This example deletes threadpool-1.

asadmin> delete-threadpool threadpool-1
Command delete-threadpool executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-threadpool at the command line.

6 Administering Web Applications

This chapter explains how to administer web applications in the Eclipse GlassFish 7 environment.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing some of these tasks by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

Invoking a Servlet by Alternate Means

You can call a servlet deployed to Eclipse GlassFish by using a URL in a browser or embedded as a link in an HTML or JSP file. The format of a servlet invocation URL is as follows:

http://server:port/context-root/servlet-mapping?name=value

The following table describes each URL section.

Table 6-1 URL Fields for Servlets Within an Application

URL element Description

server`:`port

The IP address (or host name) and optional port number.

To access the default web module for a virtual server, specify only this URL section. You do not need to specify the context-root or servlet-name unless you also wish to specify name-value parameters.

context-root

For an application, the context root is defined in the context-root element of the application.xml, sun-application.xml, or sun-web.xml file. For an individually deployed web module, the context root is specified during deployment.

For both applications and individually deployed web modules, the default context root is the name of the WAR file minus the .war suffix.

servlet-mapping

The servlet-mapping as configured in the web.xml file.

?`name=value…​`

Optional request parameters.

Example 6-1 Invoking a Servlet With a URL

In this example, localhost is the host name, MortPages is the context root, and calcMortgage is the servlet mapping.

http://localhost:8080/MortPages/calcMortgage?rate=8.0&per=360&bal=180000

Example 6-2 Invoking a Servlet From Within a JSP File

To invoke a servlet from within a JSP file, you can use a relative path. For example:

<jsp:forward page="TestServlet"/><jsp:include page="TestServlet"/>

Changing Log Output for a Servlet

ServletContext.log messages are sent to the server log. By default, the System.out and System.err output of servlets are sent to the server log. During startup, server log messages are echoed to the System.err output. Also by default, there is no Windows-only console for the System.err output.

You can change these defaults using the Administration Console Write to System Log box. If this box is checked, System.out output is sent to the server log. If it is unchecked, System.out output is sent to the system default location only.

Defining Global Features for Web Applications

You can use the default-web.xml file to define features such as filters and security constraints that apply to all web applications.

For example, directory listings are disabled by default for added security. To enable directory listings in your domain’s default-web.xml file, search for the definition of the servlet whose servlet-name is equal to default, and set the value of the init-param named listings to true. Then restart the server.

<init-param>
   <param-name>listings</param-name>
   <param-value>true</param-value>
</init-param>

If listings is set to true, you can also determine how directory listings are sorted. Set the value of the init-param named sortedBy to NAME, SIZE, or LAST_MODIFIED. Then restart the server.

<init-param>
   <param-name>sortedBy</param-name>
   <param-value>LAST_MODIFIED</param-value>
</init-param>

The mime-mapping elements in default-web.xml are global and inherited by all web applications. You can override these mappings or define your own using mime-mapping elements in your web application’s web.xml file. For more information about mime-mapping elements, see the Servlet specification.

You can use the Administration Console to edit the default-web.xml file, or edit the file directly using the following steps.

To Use the default-web.xml File

  1. Place the JAR file for the filter, security constraint, or other feature in the domain-dir/lib directory.

  2. Edit the domain-dir/config/default-web.xml file to refer to the JAR file.

  3. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

Redirecting a URL

You can specify that a request for an old URL be treated as a request for a new URL. This is called redirecting a URL.

To specify a redirected URL for a virtual server, use the redirect_n property, where n is a positive integer that allows specification of more than one. Each of these redirect_n properties is inherited by all web applications deployed on the virtual server.

The value of each redirect_n property has two components which can be specified in any order:

  • The first component, from, specifies the prefix of the requested URI to match.

  • The second component, url-prefix, specifies the new URL prefix to return to the client. The from prefix is replaced by this URL prefix.

Example 6-3 Redirecting a URL

This example redirects from dummy to etude:

<property name="redirect_1" value="from=/dummy url-prefix=http://etude"/>

Administering mod_jk

The Apache Tomcat Connector mod_jk can be used to connect the web container with web servers such as Apache HTTP Server. By using mod_jk, which comes with Eclipse GlassFish, you can front Eclipse GlassFish with Apache HTTP Server.

You can also use mod_jk directly at the JSP/servlet engine for load balancing. For more information about configuring mod_jk and Apache HTTP Server for load balancing with Eclipse GlassFish 7 refer to "Configuring HTTP Load Balancing" in Eclipse GlassFish High Availability Administration Guide.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Enable mod_jk

You can front Eclipse GlassFish with Apache HTTP Server by enabling the mod_jk protocol for one of Eclipse GlassFish’s network listeners, as described in this procedure. A typical use for mod_jk would be to have Apache HTTP Server handle requests for static resources, while having requests for dynamic resources, such as servlets and JavaServer Pages (JSPs), forwarded to, and handled by the Eclipse GlassFish back-end instance.

When you use the jk-enabled attribute of the network listener, you do not need to copy any additional JAR files into the /lib directory. You can also create JK connectors under different virtual servers by using the network listener attribute jk-enabled.

  1. Install Apache HTTP Server and mod_jk.

  2. Configure the following files:

    • apache2/conf/httpd.conf, the main Apache configuration file

    • apache2/conf/workers.properties

      Example 6-4 and Example 6-5 provide examples of configuring these two files.

  3. Start Apache HTTP Server (httpd).

  4. Start Eclipse GlassFish with at least one web application deployed.

    In order for the mod_jk-enabled network listener to start listening for requests, the web container must be started. Normally, this is achieved by deploying a web application.

  5. Create a jk-enabled network listener by using the create-network-listener subcommand.

    asadmin> create-network-listener --protocol http-listener-1 \
    --listenerport 8009 --jkenabled true jk-connector
  6. If you are using the glassfish-jk.properties file to use non-default values of attributes described at http://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-5.5-doc/config/ajp.html), set the jk-configuration-file property of the network listener to the fully-qualified file name of the glassfish-jk.properties file.

    asadmin> set server-config.network-config.network-listeners.network-listener.\
    jk-connector.jk-configuration-file=domain-dir/config/glassfish-jk.properties
  7. If you expect to need more than five threads for the listener, increase the maximum threads in the http-thread-pool pool:

    asadmin> set configs.config.server-config.thread-pools.thread-pool.\
    http-thread-pool.max-thread-pool-size=value
  8. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

Example 6-4 httpd.conf File for mod_jk

This example shows an httpd.conf file that is set for mod_jk. In this example, mod_jk used as a simple pass-through.

LoadModule jk_module /usr/lib/httpd/modules/mod_jk.so
JkWorkersFile /etc/httpd/conf/worker.properties
# Where to put jk logs
JkLogFile /var/log/httpd/mod_jk.log
# Set the jk log level [debug/error/info]
JkLogLevel debug
# Select the log format
JkLogStampFormat "[%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y] "
# JkOptions indicate to send SSL KEY SIZE,
JkOptions +ForwardKeySize +ForwardURICompat -ForwardDirectories
# JkRequestLogFormat set the request format
JkRequestLogFormat "%w %V %T"
# Send all jsp requests to GlassFish
JkMount /*.jsp worker1
# Send all glassfish-test requests to GlassFish
JkMount /glassfish-test/* worker1

Example 6-5 workers.properties File for mod_jk

This example shows a workers.properties that is set for mod_jk. This workers.properties file is referenced in the second line of Example 6-4

# Define 1 real worker using ajp13
worker.list=worker1
# Set properties for worker1 (ajp13)
worker.worker1.type=ajp13
worker.worker1.host=localhost
worker.worker1.port=8009

See Also

For more information on Apache, see http://httpd.apache.org/.

For more information on Apache Tomcat Connector, see http://tomcat.apache.org/connectors-doc/index.html.

To Load Balance Using mod_jk and Eclipse GlassFish

Load balancing is the process of dividing the amount of work that a computer has to do between two or more computers so that more work gets done in the same amount of time. Load balancing can be configured with or without security.

In order to support stickiness, the Apache mod_jk load balancer relies on a jvmRoute system property that is included in any JSESSIONID received by the load balancer. This means that every Eclipse GlassFish instance that is front-ended by the Apache load balancer must be configured with a unique jvmRoute system property.

  1. On each of the instances, perform the steps in To Enable mod_jk.

    If your instances run on the same machine, you must choose different JK ports. The ports must match worker.worker*.port in your workers.properties file. See the properties file in Example 6-5.

  2. On each of the instances, create the jvmRoute system property of Eclipse GlassFish by using the create-jvm-options subcommand.

    Use the following format:

    asadmin> create-jvm-options "-DjvmRoute=/instance-worker-name"/

    where instance-worker-name is the name of the worker that you defined to represent the instance in the workers.properties file.

  3. To apply your changes, restart Apache HTTP Server and Eclipse GlassFish.

Example 6-6 httpd.conf File for Load Balancing

This example shows an httpd.conf file that is set for load balancing.

LoadModule jk_module /usr/lib/httpd/modules/mod_jk.so
JkWorkersFile /etc/httpd/conf/worker.properties
# Where to put jk logs
JkLogFile /var/log/httpd/mod_jk.log
# Set the jk log level [debug/error/info]
JkLogLevel debug
# Select the log format
JkLogStampFormat "[%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y] "
# JkOptions indicate to send SSL KEY SIZE,
JkOptions +ForwardKeySize +ForwardURICompat -ForwardDirectories
# JkRequestLogFormat set the request format
JkRequestLogFormat "%w %V %T"
# Send all jsp requests to GlassFish
JkMount /*.jsp worker1
# Send all glassfish-test requests to GlassFish
JkMount /glassfish-test/* loadbalancer

Example 6-7 workers.properties File for Load Balancing

This example shows a workers.properties or glassfish-jk.properties file that is set for load balancing. The worker.worker*.port should match with JK ports you created.

worker.list=worker1,worker2,loadbalancer
worker.worker1.type=ajp13
worker.worker1.host=localhost
worker.worker1.port=8009
worker.worker1.lbfactor=1
worker.worker1.socket_keepalive=1
worker.worker1.socket_timeout=300
worker.worker2.type=ajp13
worker.worker2.host=localhost
worker.worker2.port=8010
worker.worker2.lbfactor=1
worker.worker2.socket_keepalive=1
worker.worker2.socket_timeout=300
worker.loadbalancer.type=lb
worker.loadbalancer.balance_workers=worker1,worker2

To Enable SSL Between the mod_jk Load Balancer and the Browser

To activate security for mod_jk on Eclipse GlassFish, you must first generate a Secure Socket Layer (SSL) self-signed certificate on the Apache HTTP Server with the mod_ssl module. The tasks include generating a private key, a Certificate Signing Request (CSR), a self-signed certificate, and configuring SSL-enabled virtual hosts.

Before You Begin

The mod_jk connector must be enabled.

  1. Generate the private key as follows:

    openssl genrsa -des3 -rand file1:file2:file3:file4:file5 -out server.key 1024

    where file1:file2: and so on represents the random compressed files.

  2. Remove the pass-phrase from the key as follows:

    openssl rsa -in server.key -out server.pem
  3. Generate the CSR is as follows:

    openssl req -new -key server.pem -out server.csr

    Enter the information you are prompted for.

  4. Generate a temporary certificate as follows:

    openssl x509 -req -days 60 -in server.csr -signkey server.pem -out server.crt

    This temporary certificate is good for 60 days.

  5. Create the http-ssl.conf file under the /etc/apache2/conf.d directory.

  6. In the http-ssl.conf file, add one of the following redirects:

    • Redirect a web application, for example, JkMount /hello/* worker1.

    • Redirect all requests, for example, JkMount /* worker1.

      # Send all jsp requests to GlassFish
      JkMount /*.jsp worker1
      # Send all glassfish-test requests to GlassFish
      JkMount /glassfish-test/* loadbalancer

Example 6-8 http-ssl.conf File for mod_jk Security

A basic SSL-enabled virtual host will appear in the http-ssl.conf file. In this example, all requests are redirected.

Listen 443
<VirtualHost _default_:443>
SSLEngine on
SSLCipherSuite ALL:!ADH:!EXP56:RC4+RSA:+HIGH:+MEDIUM:+LOW:+SSLv2:+EXP:+eNULL
SSLCertificateFile "/etc/apache2/2.2/server.crt"
SSLCertificateKeyFile "/etc/apache2/2.2/server.pem"
JkMount /* worker1
</VirtualHost>

To Enable SSL Between the mod_jk Load Balancer and Eclipse GlassFish

This procedure does not enable SSL transfer between mod_jk and Eclipse GlassFish. It enables mod_jk to forward SSL-encrypted information from the browser to Eclipse GlassFish.

Before You Begin

The self-signed certificate must be configured.

  1. Perform the steps in To Enable mod_jk.

  2. Start another Eclipse GlassFish with at least one web application deployed.

    In order for the mod_jk-enabled network listener to start listening for requests, the web container must be started. Normally, this is achieved by deploying a web application.

  3. Follow instructions from To Configure an HTTP Listener for SSL on the mod_jk connector.

    Use the following format:

    asadmin> create-ssl --type http-listener --certname sampleCert new-listener
  4. Add the following directives in the httpd.conf file under the /etc/apache2/conf.d directory:

    # Should mod_jk send SSL information (default is On)
    JkExtractSSL On
    # What is the indicator for SSL (default is HTTPS)
    JkHTTPSIndicator HTTPS
    # What is the indicator for SSL session (default is SSL_SESSION_ID)
    JkSESSIONIndicator SSL_SESSION_ID
    # What is the indicator for client SSL cipher suit (default is SSL_CIPHER )
    JkCIPHERIndicator SSL_CIPHER
    # What is the indicator for the client SSL certificated? (default is SSL_CLIENT_CERT )
    JkCERTSIndicator SSL_CLIENT_CERT
  5. To apply your changes, restart Apache HTTP Server and Eclipse GlassFish.

Administering mod_proxy_ajp

The Apache Connector mod_proxy_ajp can be used to connect the web container with Apache HTTP Server. By using mod_proxy_ajp, you can front Eclipse GlassFish with Apache HTTP Server.

To Enable mod_proxy_ajp

You can front Eclipse GlassFish with Apache HTTP Server and its mod_proxy_ajp connector by enabling the AJP protocol for one of Eclipse GlassFish’s network listeners, as described in this procedure. A typical use for mod_proxy_ajp would be to have Apache HTTP Server handle requests for static resources, while having requests for dynamic resources, such as servlets and JavaServer Pages (JSPs), forwarded to, and handled by the Eclipse GlassFish back-end instance.

  1. Install Apache HTTP Server.

    For information on installing Apache HTTP Server, see http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/install.html.

  2. Configure apache2/conf/httpd.conf, the main Apache configuration file.

    For example:

    LoadModule proxy_module /usr/lib/httpd/modules/mod_proxy.so
    LoadModule proxy_ajp_module /usr/lib/httpd/modules/mod_proxy_ajp.so
    
    Listen 1979
    NameVirtualHost *:1979
    <VirtualHost *:1979>
       ServerName localhost
       ErrorLog /var/log/apache2/ajp.error.log
       CustomLog /var/log/apache2/ajp.log combined
    
       <Proxy *>
         AddDefaultCharset Off
         Order deny,allow
         Allow from all
       </Proxy>
    
       ProxyPass / ajp://localhost:8009/
       ProxyPassReverse / ajp://localhost:8009/
    </VirtualHost>
  3. Start Apache HTTP Server (httpd).

  4. Create a jk-enabled network listener by using the create-network-listener subcommand.

    asadmin> create-network-listener --protocol http-listener-1 \
    --listenerport 8009 --jkenabled true jk-connector
  5. If you expect to need more than five threads for the listener, increase the maximum threads in the http-thread-pool pool:

    asadmin> set configs.config.server-config.thread-pools.thread-pool.\
    http-thread-pool.max-thread-pool-size=value
  6. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

See Also

For more information on Apache, see http://httpd.apache.org/.

For more information on the Apache mod_proxy_ajp Connector, see http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.1/mod/mod_proxy.html and http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.1/mod/mod_proxy_ajp.html.

For more information on the AJP protocol, see http://tomcat.apache.org/connectors-doc/ajp/ajpv13a.html.

To Load Balance Using mod_proxy_ajp and Eclipse GlassFish

Load balancing is the process of dividing the amount of work that a computer has to do between two or more computers so that more work gets done in the same amount of time. In the Eclipse GlassFish context, load balancing is most frequently used to distribute work among the instances in a Eclipse GlassFish cluster.

To configure load balancing using mod_proxy_ajp, you must use the mod_proxy_balancer Apache module in addition to mod_proxy_ajp.

In order to support stickiness, the mod_proxy_balancer load balancer relies on a jvmRoute system property that is included in any JSESSIONID received by the load balancer. Consequently, every Eclipse GlassFish instance that is front-ended by the Apache load balancer must be configured with a unique jvmRoute system property.

  1. Install Apache HTTP Server.

    For information on installing Apache HTTP Server, see http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/install.html.

  2. Configure apache2/conf/httpd.conf, the main Apache configuration file.

    For example:

    LoadModule proxy_module /usr/lib/httpd/modules/mod_proxy.so
    LoadModule proxy_ajp_module /usr/lib/httpd/modules/mod_proxy_ajp.so
    LoadModule proxy_balancer_module /usr/lib/httpd/modules/mod_proxy_balancer.so
    
    # Forward proxy needs to be turned off
    ProxyRequests Off
    # Keep the original Host Header
    ProxyPreserveHost On
    
       <Proxy *>
          Order deny,allow
          Deny from all
          Allow from localhost
       </Proxy>
    
    # Each BalancerMember corresponds to an instance in the Eclipse GlassFish
    # cluster. The port specified for each instance must match the ajp port
    # specified for that instance.
    <Proxy balancer://localhost>
        BalancerMember ajp://localhost:8009
        BalancerMember ajp://localhost:8010
        BalancerMember ajp://localhost:8011
    </Proxy>
  3. Start Apache HTTP Server (httpd).

  4. In Eclipse GlassFish, use the create-network-listener subcommand to create a jk-enabled network listener targeted to the cluster.

    For example:

    asadmin> create-network-listener --jkenabled true --target cluster1 \
    --protocol http-listener-1 --listenerport ${AJP_PORT} jk-listener

    In this example, cluster1 is the name of the cluster and jk-listener is the name of the new listener.

  5. If you expect to need more than five threads for the listener, increase the maximum threads in the http-thread-pool pool:

    asadmin> set configs.config.cluster1-config.thread-pools.thread-pool.\
    http-thread-pool.max-thread-pool-size=value
  6. Use the create-jvm-options subcommand to create the jvmRoute property targeted to the cluster.

    For example:

    asadmin> create-jvm-options --target cluster1 \
    "-DjvmRoute=\${AJP_INSTANCE_NAME}"
  7. Use the create-system-properties subcommand to define the AJP_PORT and AJP_INSTANCE_NAME properties for each of the instances in the cluster, making sure to match the port values you used in Step 2 when specifying the load balancer members.

    For example:

    asadmin> create-system-properties --target instance1 AJP_PORT=8009
    asadmin> create-system-properties --target instance1 \
    AJP_INSTANCE_NAME=instance1
    asadmin> create-system-properties --target instance2 AJP_PORT=8010
    asadmin> create-system-properties --target instance2 \
    AJP_INSTANCE_NAME=instance2
    asadmin> create-system-properties --target instance3 AJP_PORT=8011
    asadmin> create-system-properties --target instance3 \
    AJP_INSTANCE_NAME=instance3

    In this example, instance1, instance2 and instance3 are the names of the Eclipse GlassFish instances in the cluster.

  8. To apply your changes, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

7 Administering the Logging Service

This chapter provides instructions on how to configure logging and how to view log information in the Eclipse GlassFish 7 environment.

The following topics are addressed here:

About Logging

Logging is the process by which Java Virtual Machine captures information about events that occur, such as important method calls, reaching states, or even configuration errors, security failures, or server malfunction.

This data is recorded in log files and is usually the first source of information when problems occur. Analyzing the log files can help you to follow events that occur in the server runtime and determine the overall health of the server.

Although application components can use other logging frameworks as SLF4J or LOG4J2, we recommend to use the Java Util Logging Framework or even better it’s latest facade System.Logger.

Log Manager

Log Manager is a service responsible for the logging system. The service is initialized on JVM startup. After it’s first usage it cannot be changed until the JVM is restarted, but it can be reconfigured. Eclipse GlassFish now comes with customized log manager.

Level

Level is the key feature of the logging system. Every JUL Logger has an internal integer value representing severity. Levels are set to

  • Log Record as the severity level of the record.

  • Logger as the minimal severity level processed by the logger. Log record with lower severity is ignored.

  • Handler as the minimal severity level processed by the handler. Log record with lower severity is ignored.

There are following predefined levels; however the real usage depends on developers:

  • ALL - Special level used by loggers and handlers to declare that they accept all levels.

  • SEVERE - Used for serious errors.

  • WARNING - Used for log records providing an information about some hazards which can be handled by the application or they can even lead to a severe state.

  • INFO - Used to log some important information useful even for the user.

  • CONFIG - Used for providing an information related to a configuration.

  • FINE - Level for tracing. Used for providing an information about internal behavior of the java application, but still not so detailed.

  • FINER - Level for tracing. More detailed information, for example usages of Logger.entering and Logger.exiting methods.

  • FINEST - Level for tracing. Usually very verbose messages slowing down the system but providing a complete information what is going on.

  • OFF - Special level used by loggers and handlers to declare that they ignore all levels.

Some projects define custom levels, but at this time it is rather rare.

Log Record

Log Record is an object created by a Logger or it’s caller and sent to the hierarchy of loggers and handlers which will process it. Every time you use the Logger object to log a message with a level passing configured level filters, one LogRecord instance is created and processed.

Logger

Logger is a facade of the logging system. It is transparent so it can be initialized as a constant. Logger name is usually same as the full name of the class which created it, but specialized loggers can be used too.

Loggers are organized in a tree, so the log record is usually processed by the logger which accepted or created it, then passed to the parent logger (parent package), it’s parent, etc. unless it is configured to not to do so.

The logger log level specifies a severity level to filter what is important for the user. There are several special loggers:

  • root logger - uses an empty string as a name.

  • system root logger - uses an empty string as a name too, but is not accessible outside JDK, which uses it internally.

  • global logger - uses global as it’s name. It is not recommended to use it.

Handler

Handler is responsible for handling the record so it can print the record to the standard output, file, e-mail, network, etc. Handler have also it’s own level set. This level serves as a filter of incomming log records - usually it is not desired to send detailed messages to an e-mail, for example.

Formatter

Formatter is responsible for formatting of the log record to a String object. It is a usual attribute of the handler, but not all handlers use formatters, for example some handlers may just serialize the log record, call the logging system of the operating system or call a web service.

Configuration

JUL is usually configured by the logging.properties file unless you would use different log manager or you use the JVM option java.util.logging.config.file to override it.

Default Configuration

The Configuration File

The DAS as well as each configuration, instance, and cluster has its own logging properties file. By default in an Eclipse GlassFish domain, logging properties files are created in the following locations:

Target Default Location of Logging Properties File

DAS

domain-dir/config/logging.properties

A configuration

domain-dir/config/config-name/logging.properties, where config-name represents the name of a configuration that is shared by one or more instances or clusters.

An instance

domain-dir/config/instance-name-config/logging.properties, where instance-name represents the name of the instance.

A cluster

domain-dir/config/cluster-name-config/logging.properties, where cluster-name represents the name of the cluster.

For information about configuring logging properties, see Configuring the Logging Service.

The Server Log File

By default Eclipse GlassFish log records are captured in the server.log file which can be found in the logs directory under the instance’s directory. Each instance, managed server instance (that is, each cluster member), and the domain administration server (DAS) has an individual server log file.

This file will contain also logs of deployed applications if they use Java Util Logging, System.Logger or any other facade mapped to this logging system in the backend.

Instance Default Location

DAS

domain-dir/logs/server.log

Each server instance

instance-dir/logs/server.log

Cluster instance

instance-dir/logs/server.log

For example, in a domain hosted on a given machine that includes a cluster with two managed servers (ClusterServer1 and ClusterServer1) and a standalone instance (StandaloneServer), the log files might be arranged in the following directory structure. In this directory structure, the server.log file for the DAS is located in domain-dir/logs.

as-install-parent directory
  glassfish/
    domains/
      domain-dir/
        logs/
          server.log
    nodes/
      hostname/
        ClusterServer1/
          logs/
            server.log
        ClusterServer2/
          logs/
            server.log
        StandaloneServer/
          logs/
            server.log

The server.log file uses the ODLLogFormatter log format by default and is rolled to a new file after it’s size exceeds 100 Megabytes. If something in server’s JVM prints to the standard output stream or standard error stream, it is redirected to the server.log file.

You can change the default name, location, formatting or management of a log file by modifying the logging properties file for the corresponding instance, however we don’t recommend to change the location of the file as it may affect availability of some services.

The Access Log File

The access.log file serves to log all requests made to the HTTP service or virtual server. This feature is disabled by default, but you can enable it by using the asadmin set command, using Admininistration Console or the Admin REST API.

This logging feature is not persisted in logging.properties but in domain.xml, because it doesn’t use Java Util Logging framework but an internal implementation instead.

asadmin> get 'server.http-service.*'
server.http-service.virtual-server.__asadmin.access-log=${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/access
server.http-service.virtual-server.__asadmin.access-logging-enabled=inherit
...
server.http-service.virtual-server.server.access-log=${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/access
server.http-service.virtual-server.server.access-logging-enabled=inherit
server.http-service.access-log.buffer-size-bytes=32768
server.http-service.access-log.format=%client.name% %auth-user-name% %datetime% %request% %status% %response.length%
server.http-service.access-log.max-history-files=-1
server.http-service.access-log.rotation-enabled=true
server.http-service.access-log.rotation-interval-in-minutes=1440
server.http-service.access-log.rotation-policy=time
server.http-service.access-log.rotation-suffix=yyyy-MM-dd
server.http-service.access-log.write-interval-seconds=300
server.http-service.access-logging-enabled=false

Standard Output Stream

When you start the server with the --verbose argument, the server prints log records to the standard output too. The output is limited to just INFO levels and higher and uses the standard error stream, but this can be switched to standard output stream too. Log records are formatted to the Uniform Log Format] by default.

Logger Levels

The logging.properties contains many loggers used by the Eclipse GlassFish to make changes easier. Most of loggers use the INFO level by default.

Configuring the Logging Service

You can either directly edit the logging.properties file or use the asadmin command, Administration Console or REST API. On DAS, changes in the file have immediate effect with some small latency before they get applied. For instances managed by nodes it is a bit more complicated and it depends on the synchronization of the configuration with DAS.

If you edit logging.properties manually on an instance managed by the node, it will be overwritten on the next synchronization with DAS.

Loggers

Changing the logger level is quite easy and it is a preferred way how to filter log records by their importance.

So for example if you want to get all records handled by the logging system, you comment out all logger level settings except the root logger and set it’s level to FINEST.

.level=FINEST

Handlers

You can use all JUL features, but some of Eclipse GlassFish features depend on some settings like the existence of the configured GlassFishLogHandler and it’s server.log file. Also be careful when changing it’s configuration as it may affect the performance.

GlassFishLogHandler

The org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler is used to handle persist log records into the server.log file. It is optimized for the best performance so logging would not reduce the performance of the server instance and applications deployed to it.

Example:

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.buffer.capacity=10000
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.buffer.timeoutInSeconds=0
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.enabled=true
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.encoding=UTF-8
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.file=${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/server.log
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.flushFrequency=1
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter=org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.ODLLogFormatter
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.excludedFields=
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.multiline=true
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.printSource=false
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.level=ALL
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.redirectStandardStreams=true
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.compress=false
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.maxArchiveFiles=0
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.megabytes=100
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.minutes=0
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.rollOnDateChange=false
Basic Settings
  • enabled - false means that the handler will stay configured in the logging system, but it will ignore incoming records. Default is true.

  • encoding - file’s character encoding. Default is UTF-8.

  • file - the output file; you can use also system options - default is ${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/server.log

  • flushFrequency - count of records to be handled in a single batch. Default is 1.

  • formatter - a formatter class to be used for formatting log records as strings. Default value is org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.ODLLogFormatter

  • formatter.* - can be used for custom settings of the formatter. This works only for ODLLogFormatter, UniformLogFormatter and OneLineFormatter.

  • level - Level used to filter log records. Less important log records will be ignored. Default is ALL.

  • redirectStandardStreams - if true, which is default, everything printed to the standard output stream and standard error stream is processed by the handler as an INFO resp. ERROR log record. While using these streams is not recommended in Jakarta EE applications, it should be rather rare.

Receive Buffer

The GlassFishLogHandler has a receive buffer for incomming log records to optimize throughput. If the buffer is full and a logger tries to add another record, logger’s thread is blocked. Then if the timeout is set to 0, the thread is blocked until there’s free capacity available - if the handler cannot process records, it may be blocked forever. But if you set the timeout to a positive value, and the thread is blocked for longer time, the whole buffer is reset and added is just an error record describing what happened.

Despite this situation should not occur in standard situation, it may happen ie. when the file system stops working or is extremely slow.

  • buffer.capacity - count of records in the receive buffer, default is 10000 log records.

  • buffer.timeoutInSeconds - maximal time for waiting. Default is 0 which means forever. The buffer is reset after timeout, which means that all unprocessible log records are lost.

Log File Rotation

The GlassFishLogHandler can roll the output log file under following conditions:

  • if user forced him to do so, see To Rotate Log Files Manually for more

  • if the size of the file exceeded given limit

  • if the date changed

  • if the specified number of minutes have passed since the file was opened

The last two conditions are exclusive, the date change has higher priority.

The <<`flushFrequency`>> parameter affects how many log records will be formatted into the log file before the file is rolled out even after the file size exceeded it’s configured limit.

The rotation means that the log file is renamed, so the new file name gets a current timestamp as a suffix. If there already is a file with the same name, the implementation tries to add another suffix with a counter until it finds a name which doesn’t exist yet.

drwxrwxr-x 14 admin admin   4096 čec 29 21:21 ../
-rw-rw-r--  1 admin admin   2521 srp  3 18:18 server.log
-rw-rw-r--  1 admin admin 191391 čec 29 21:21 server.log_2022-07-29T21-21-54
-rw-rw-r--  1 admin admin  24920 srp  3 18:18 server.log_2022-08-03T18-18-38

You can configure the logging service to change the default settings for log file rotation, as explained in Setting Log File Rotation.

This is a list of related configuration properties:

  • rotation.compress - compress the rotated file using GZIP algorithm provided by JDK. Default is false.

  • rotation.maxArchiveFiles - maximal count of archived log files (excludes the active one). Default is 0, which means unlimited.

  • rotation.limit.megabytes - size of the file initiating rotation of the file. Default is 100 Megabytes. The final file will be slightly larger.

  • rotation.limit.minutes - number of minutes since the last rotation. Default is 0 (unlimited, disabled).

  • rotation.rollOnDateChange - if set to true rolls the file at midnight. Default is false.

SimpleLogHandler

The org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler has similar targets as the `ConsoleHandler`, with few differences:

  • can be configured to use STDOUT instead of STDERR

  • uses OneLineFormatter by default

The handler configuration properties:

  • encoding - output character encoding. Default is null which means it will use the system default.

  • formatter - a formatter class to be used for formatting log records as strings. Default value is <<`org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.OneLineFormatter`>>

  • formatter.* - can be used for custom settings of the formatter. This works only for ODLLogFormatter, UniformLogFormatter and OneLineFormatter.

  • level - Level used to filter log records. Less important log records will be ignored. Uses INFO as a default.

  • useErrorStream - if false, uses STDOUT instead of STDERR. Default is true.

Configuration example:

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler.formatter=org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.OneLineFormatter
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler.formatter.printSource=false
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler.level=INFO
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler.useErrorStream=true
SyslogHandler

The org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler is a special handler which is able to send log records to the Unix Syslog facility. The prerequisity is that the Syslog service must listen on the configured network endpoint. See Syslog on Wikipedia.org for more.

The handler configuration properties:

  • buffer.capacity - count of records in the receive buffer. Default is 5000 log records.

  • buffer.timeoutInSeconds - maximal time for waiting. Default is 300. The buffer is reset after timeout, which means that all unprocessible log records are lost.

  • enabled - false means that the handler will stay configured in the logging system, but it will ignore incoming records. Default is true.

  • encoding - output character encoding used to send data to the Syslog service. Default is UTF-8.

  • formatter - a formatter class to be used for formatting log records as strings. Default value is <<`java.util.logging.SimpleFormatter`>>

  • host - a host name or IP address used of the UDP endpoint. Default is an autodetected name of the local host.

  • level - Level used to filter log records. Less important log records will be ignored. The default level is WARNING.

  • port - a port of the Syslog UDP listener. Default is 514.

Configuration example:

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.enabled=true
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.encoding=UTF-8
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.formatter=java.util.logging.SimpleFormatter
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.host=
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.level=SEVERE
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.port=514

Formatters

Excluded Fields

Some of formatters support exclusion of some of fields. Currently is possible to exclude following fields:

  • tid - Thread id and name

  • levelValue - Integer value of the log level.

ODLLogFormatter

The org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.ODLLogFormatter logs records in the Oracle Diagnostic Loggging Format (ODL).

[2022-08-01T19:43:29.952291+02:00] [GlassFish 7.0] [INFO] [] [com.sun.enterprise.server.logging.LogManagerService] [tid: _ThreadID=1 _ThreadName=main] [levelValue: 800] [[
Using property file: /app/appservers/glassfish7/glassfish/domains/domain1/config/logging.properties]]

[2022-08-01T19:43:29.986871+02:00] [GlassFish 7.0] [INFO] [NCLS-LOGGING-00009] [com.sun.enterprise.server.logging.LogManagerService] [tid: _ThreadID=1 _ThreadName=main] [levelValue: 800] [[
Running GlassFish Version: Eclipse GlassFish  7.0.0  (build master-b827-g71a6150 2022-08-01T11:18:51+0200)]]

The formatter has following properties:

  • excludedFields - comma separated list of fields which should not be printed. None by default. See Excluded Fields

  • fieldSeparator - String separating fields. Space by default.

  • multiline - if set to true (default), the end of line character is inserted before the log message.

  • printSequenceNumber - if set to true, logs the sequence number of each log record. Default is false.

  • printSource - if set to true, logs the class and method which created the log record. Default is false.

  • timestampFormat - see the DateTimeFormatter documentation. Default is ISO-8601 timestamp with microseconds and time zone.

UniformLogFormatter

The org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.UniformLogFormatter logs records in the Uniform Loggging Format.

[#|2022-08-02T18:16:29.677628+02:00|INFO|GlassFish 7.0|com.sun.enterprise.server.logging.LogManagerService|_ThreadID=1;_ThreadName=main;_LevelValue=800;|
Using property file: /app/appservers/glassfish7/glassfish/domains/domain1/config/logging.properties|#]

[#|2022-08-02T18:16:29.755356+02:00|INFO|GlassFish 7.0|com.sun.enterprise.server.logging.LogManagerService|_ThreadID=1;_ThreadName=main;_LevelValue=800;_MessageID=NCLS-LOGGING-00009;|
Running GlassFish Version: Eclipse GlassFish  7.0.0  (build master-b827-g71a6150 2022-08-01T11:18:51+0200)|#]

The formatter has following properties:

  • excludedFields - comma separated list of fields which should not be printed. None by default. See Excluded Fields

  • fieldSeparator - String separating fields. Space by default.

  • multiline - if set to true (default), the end of line character is inserted before the log message.

  • printSequenceNumber - if set to true, logs the sequence number of each log record. Default is false.

  • printSource - if set to true, logs the class and method which created the log record. Default is false.

  • recordMarker.begin - the prefix of the log record, default is [#|.

  • recordMarker.end - the suffix of the log record, default is |#].

  • timestampFormat - see the DateTimeFormatter documentation. Default is ISO-8601 timestamp with microseconds and time zone.

OneLineFormatter

The org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.OneLineFormatter logs records in the following simple format:

22:50:43.174228    INFO                 main          com.sun.enterprise.server.logging.LogManagerService Using property file: /app/appservers/glassfish7/glassfish/domains/domain1/config/logging.properties
22:50:43.266648    INFO                 main          com.sun.enterprise.server.logging.LogManagerService Running GlassFish Version: Eclipse GlassFish  7.0.0  (build master-b827-g71a6150 2022-08-01T11:18:51+0200)
  • printSource - if set to true (default), logs the class and method which created the log record while when set to false it prefers the logger name.

  • size.level - number of characters taken by the level column. Default is 7.

  • size.thread - number of characters taken by the thread column. Default is 20.

  • size.class - number of characters taken by the class name column. Default is 60.

  • timestampFormat - see the DateTimeFormatter documentation. Default is ISO-8601 time with microseconds (not date, no timezone).

SimpleFormatter

The full name is java.util.logging.SimpleFormatter. It is a default formatter provided by the JDK, simple but very flexible. It’s most important property is format. Read the documentation of the SimpleFormatter class for more.

Using Asadmin

Each instance in an Eclipse GlassFish domain has a dedicated server.log file, and each instance and cluster has its own logging.properties file. To configure logging for an instance or a cluster, Eclipse GlassFish allows you target specific log files or logging properties files when you do the following:

  • Set log levels

  • Rotate server.log files or compress them into a ZIP archive

  • Change logging property attributes

  • List log levels or log attributes

The following subcommands optionally accept a target specification. A target can be a configuration name, server name, cluster name, or instance name, and is specified as either an operand or as a value passed using the --target option. If no target is specified when using any of these subcommands, the default target is the DAS.

Subcommand Description Target Specification

collect-log-files

Collects all available log files into a ZIP archive.

--target=target-name

list-log-attributes

Lists logging attributes in the logging properties file.

target-name operand

list-log-levels

Lists the loggers in the logging properties file and their log levels.

target-name operand

rotate-log

Rotates the log file by renaming it and creating a new log file to store new messages.

--target=target-name

set-log-attributes

Sets the specified logging attributes in the logging properties file.

--target=target-name

set-log-file-format

Sets the log file formatter.

--target=target-name

set-log-levels

Sets the log level for one or more loggers listed in the logging properties file.

--target=target-name

This section contains the following examples:

To Change the Location of the logging.properties File

You can set the name and location of the logging properties file by setting the java.util.logging.config.file system property.

You have to ensure that the output log file is always used by a single instance. In the default logging.properties it is ensured by using the ${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot} which always resolves to the instance’s root directory. Example:

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.file=${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/server.log
  1. Set the java.util.logging.config.file system property.

    asadmin create-jvm-options --target=server-config -Djava.util.logging.config.file=/logging.properties

    Alternatively, you can use the Administration Console to set this system property.

  2. To apply your change, restart all instances using this configuration. In our case it would be the DAS:

    asadmin restart-domain

To Change the Location of the Log File

Even in complex domain you can always find the right logging.properties file and update it manually. But probably safer is to use an asadmin command to do that.

To change the name and location of the log file, first use the list-log-attributes command to obtain the current log attribute setting for the log file name and location. Then use the set-log-attributes command to specify the new name or location. The default target for these two commands is the DAS. However, you can optionally specify one of the following targets:

  • Configuration name — to target all instances or clusters that share a specific configuration name.

  • Server name — to target only a specific server.

  • Instance name — to target only a specific instance.

  • Cluster name — to target only a specific cluster.

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running. Remote commands require a running server.

  2. Use the list-log-attributes command in remote mode to obtain the current log attribute settings. The name and location of the log file is set with the org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.file attribute of the logging properties file. Optionally you can target a configuration, server, instance, or cluster. If you do not specify a target, the log attribute settings for the DAS are displayed.

  3. Use the set-log-attributes command in remote mode to define a custom name or location of the log file. If you do not specify a target, the log file for the DAS is targeted by default. If you target a cluster, the name of the cluster log file for each member instance can be changed (the server log file name cannot).

Example 7-1 Changing the Name and Location of a Cluster’s Log File

This example changes the name of the cluster log file for Cluster1 to cluster1.log. Cluster1 has two server instances: ClusterServer1 and ClusterServer2.

asadmin list-log-attributes Cluster1
handlers        <org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler,org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler,org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.buffer.capacity      <10000>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.buffer.timeoutInSeconds      <0>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.enabled      <true>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.encoding     <UTF-8>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.file <${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/server.log>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.flushFrequency       <1>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter    <org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.ODLLogFormatter>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.excludedFields     <>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.multiline  <true>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.printSource        <false>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.redirectStandardStreams      <true>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.compress    <false>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.megabytes     <100>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.minutes       <0>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.maxArchiveFiles     <0>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.rollOnDateChange    <false>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler.formatter       <org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.UniformLogFormatter>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler.formatter.excludedFields        <>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler.formatter.printSource   <false>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SimpleLogHandler.useErrorStream  <true>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.buffer.capacity    <5000>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.buffer.timeoutInSeconds    <300>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.enabled    <false>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.encoding   <UTF-8>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.formatter  <java.util.logging.SimpleFormatter>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.host       <>
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.SyslogHandler.port       <514>
Command list-log-attributes executed successfully.

asadmin set-log-attributes --target Cluster1 org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.file=\${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/cluster1.log

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.file logging attribute value set to ${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/cluster1.log.
The logging attributes are saved successfully for cluster-config.

Command set-log-attributes executed successfully.

asadmin list-log-attributes ClusterServer1
...
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.file <${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/cluster1.log>
...

asadmin list-log-attributes ClusterServer2
...
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.file <${com.sun.aas.instanceRoot}/logs/cluster1.log>
...

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of these subcommands by typing asadmin help list-log-attributes and asadmin help set-log-attributes at the command line.

Setting Log Levels

The log level determines the granularity of the message as it is described in the chapter Level.

When setting log levels, you can target a configuration, server, instance, or cluster.

Setting log levels is done by using the set-log-levels subcommand. Listing log levels is done by using the list-log-levels subcommand.

The following topics are addressed here:

To List Logger Levels

Eclipse GlassFish provides the means to list all loggers and their log levels. Listing the loggers provides a convenient means to view current loggers and log levels either prior to or after making log level changes.

Use the list-log-levels subcommand in remote mode to list the modules and their current log levels. The default target for this subcommand is the DAS. However, you can optionally specify one of the following targets:

  • Configuration name — to target all instances or clusters that share a specific configuration name.

  • Server name — to target a specific server.

  • Instance name — to target a specific instance.

  • Cluster name — to target a specific cluster.

    1. Ensure that the DAS is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

    2. List the existing module loggers and log levels by using the list-log-levels subcommand.

Example 7-2 Listing Logger Levels for DAS

This example shows a partial list of the existing loggers and their log levels in the DAS.

asadmin list-log-levels
MBeans  <INFO>
com.sun.enterprise.glassfish.bootstrap  <INFO>
com.sun.enterprise.glassfish    <INFO>
com.sun.enterprise.security     <INFO>
com.sun.webui   <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.admin.rest.client    <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.admin.rest.connector <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.admin.rest   <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.bootstrap    <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.cluster.gms.admin    <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.cluster.gms.bootstrap        <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.cluster.gms  <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.concurrent   <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.config.api   <INFO>
...
Command list-log-levels executed successfully.

Example 7-3 Listing Logger Levels for an Instance

This example shows a partial list of the loggers and log levels for the instance MyServer2.

asadmin list-log-levels MyServer2
MBeans  <INFO>
com.sun.enterprise.glassfish.bootstrap  <INFO>
com.sun.enterprise.glassfish    <INFO>
com.sun.enterprise.security     <INFO>
com.sun.webui   <INFO>
cz.acme.level   <ALL>
jakarta.enterprise.admin.rest.client    <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.admin.rest.connector <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.admin.rest   <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.bootstrap    <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.cluster.gms.admin    <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.cluster.gms.bootstrap        <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.cluster.gms  <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.concurrent   <INFO>
jakarta.enterprise.config.api   <INFO>
...
Command list-log-levels executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-log-levels at the command line.

To Set the Logger Log Level

You will probably need to set logger levels most often. Let’s imagine that you would need to set the most verbose logging of an application using the org.acme package (and logger names).

Then you can edit the logging.properties file directly, what can be quite more complicated it you use more than one instance, see the warning.

Safer is to use the set-log-levels subcommand:

Example 7-5 Changing the Logger Log Level for a Cluster

asadmin set-log-levels --target Cluster1 org.acme=ALL
org.acme package set with log level ALL.These logging levels are set for Cluster1.
Command set-log-levels executed successfully.

Example 7-5 Setting Log Levels for Multiple Loggers

The following example sets the log level for security and web container loggers in the DAS.

asadmin set-log-levels jakarta.enterprise.system.core.security=FINE\
:jakarta.enterprise.system.container.web=WARNING
jakarta.enterprise.system.core.security package set with log level FINE.jakarta.enterprise.system.container.web package set with log level WARNING.These logging levels are set for server.
Command set-log-levels executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set-log-levels at the command line.

To Set the Handler Log Level

The handler log level specifies a severity level filter to prevent overloading of the handler. Default value is usually given by handler’s implementation and reflect targets and expected throughput of the handler. For example, you would not want to send all FINEST LogRecords by e-mail, but you would like to see them in a local log file.

Because JUL uses the same property syntax for Logger levels as for Handler levels you can use both set-log-levels and set-log-attributes subcommands to get the same result (with a bit different syntax).

Both commands in remote mode. The default target for this subcommand is the DAS. However, you can optionally specify one of the following targets using the --target option:

  • Configuration name — to target all instances or clusters that share a specific configuration name.

  • Server name — to target a specific server.

  • Instance name — to target a specific instance.

  • Cluster name — to target a specific cluster.

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running.

  2. Set the log level by using the set-log-attributes subcommand, specifying the log level of the org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler handler. For example:

    org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler <ALL>

Example 7-6 Changing the Handler Log Level

This example sets the log level for GlassFishLogHandler in the DAS to INFO:

asadmin set-log-attributes org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.level=INFO

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.level logging attribute value set to INFO.
The logging attributes are saved successfully for server.

Command set-log-attributes executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set-log-attributes at the command line.

Setting the Log File Format

You can set the format for log records in log files. The following topics are addressed here:

To Set the Log File Format

Use the set-log-file-format subcommand in remote mode to set the formatter used by Eclipse GlassFish to format log records in log files. This command is limited to the GlassFishLogHandler settings. You can also use the set-log-attributes subcommand which is more flexible. Log formats for all server instances in a cluster will be the same. For information about log formats, see Formatters.

Changing the log format forces log rotation to avoid mixed format in the same file.

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running. Remote commands require a running server.

  2. Set the formatter by using the set-log-file-format subcommand.

  3. To apply your change, restart affected instances or clusters with the synchronization enabled.

Example 7-7 Setting the Log File Format using set-log-file-format

This example sets the log file format to OneLineFormatter for standalone instance ManagedServer1 using the set-log-file-format subcommand.

asadmin set-log-file-format --target ManagedServer1 org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.OneLineFormatter
The log file formatter is set to org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.OneLineFormatter for instance server.
Command set-log-file-format executed successfully.

Example 7-8 Setting the Log File Format using set-log-attributes

This example sets the log file format to ULF for standalone instance ManagedServer1 using the set-log-attributes subcommand.

asadmin set-log-attributes --target ManagedServer1 \
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter=org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.OneLineFormatter

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter logging attribute value set to org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.OneLineFormatter.
The logging attributes are saved successfully for ManagedServer1-config.

Command set-log-attributes executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the set-log-file-format subcommand by typing asadmin help set-log-file-format at the command line. You can view the full syntax and options of the set-log-attributes subcommand by typing asadmin help set-log-attributes at the command line.

To Exclude Fields in Logs

Use the set-log-attributes subcommand in remote mode to exclude specific name-value fields from log records. If the excludeFields attribute is not specified, all name-value fields are included. The following fields can be excluded:

  • tid

  • levelVal

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running. Remote commands require a running server.

  2. Exclude fields by using the set-log-attributes subcommand, specifying the attribute and the fields to exclude.

  3. To apply your change, restart Eclipse GlassFish.

Example 7-9 Excluding Fields in the ODLLogFormatter

This example excludes the tid (thread ID and name) and levelValue (numerical value of the Level) name-value fields in log records for standalone instance ManagedServer1:

asadmin set-log-attributes --target ManagedServer1 \
org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.ODLLogFormatter.excludedFields=tid,levelValue

org.glassfish.main.jul.formatter.ODLLogFormatter.excludedFields logging attribute value set to tid,levelValue.
The logging attributes are saved successfully for ManagedServer1-config.

Command set-log-attributes executed successfully.

If there’s the same attribute of the handler’s formatter property, it has higher priority.

Example 7-10 Excluding Fields in the GlassFishLogHandler

This example excludes the tid (thread ID and name) and levelValue (numerical value of the Level) name-value fields in log records for standalone instance ManagedServer1:

asadmin set-log-attributes --target ManagedServer1 \
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.excludedFields=tid,levelValue

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.excludedFields logging attribute value set to tid,levelValue.
The logging attributes are saved successfully for ManagedServer1-config.

Command set-log-attributes executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set-log-attributes at the command line.

To Disable Multiline Mode

Use the set-log-attributes command in remote mode to disable the multiline mode. When multiline mode is enabled (the default), the body of a log message starts on a new line after the message header and is indented.

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running. Remote commands require a running server.

  2. Set multiline mode by using the set-log-attributes subcommand, specifying the formatter attribute and its value (true or false):

  3. To apply your change, restart the instance.

Example 7-11 Disabling the Multiline Mode in the log file

Multiline mode is enabled by default. The following example disables multiline mode in log files for standalone instance ManagedServer1:

asadmin set-log-attributes --target ManagedServer1 \
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.multiline=false

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.formatter.multiline logging attribute value set to false.
The logging attributes are saved successfully for ManagedServer1-config.

Command set-log-attributes executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set-log-attributes at the command line.

Setting Log File Rotation

As explained in The Server Log File, Eclipse GlassFish by default rotates the server.log file when it’s size exceeds 100 MB. However, you can change the default rotation settings. For example, you can change the file size limit at which the server rotates the log file or you can configure a server to rotate log files based on a time interval. In addition to changing when rotation occurs, you can also:

  • Specify the maximum number of rotated files that can accumulate. By default, Eclipse GlassFish does not limit the number of rotated log files that are retained. However, you can set a limit. After the number of log files reaches this limit, subsequent file rotations delete the oldest rotated log file.

  • Rotate the log file manually. A manual rotation forces the immediate rotation of the target log file.

Changing the default log rotation settings is done using the set-log-attributes subcommand, and rotating log files manually is done using the rotate-log subcommand, as explained in the following sections:

To Change the Rotation File Size

Use the set-log-attributes subcommand in remote mode to change the log rotation file size. The default target of this subcommand is the DAS. Optionally, you can target a configuration, server, instance, or cluster.

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running.

  2. Change the rotation file size limit by using the set-log-attributes subcommand, specifying the attribute and the desired limit in megabytes:

    org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.megabytes=1000
  3. Changes will be applied automatically after saving the change to the instance’s logging.properties file.

Example 7-12 Changing the Rotation Size

The following example sets the log file rotation size to 1 MB for the standalone instance ManagedServer1:

asadmin set-log-attributes --target ManagedServer1 \
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.megabytes=1000

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.megabytes logging attribute value set to 1000.
The logging attributes are saved successfully for ManagedServer1-config.

Command set-log-attributes executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set-log-attributes at the command line.

To Change the File Rotation Interval

Use the set-log-attributes subcommand in remote mode to change the log file rotation time limit interval. The default target of this subcommand is the DAS. Optionally, you can target a configuration, server, instance, or cluster. The default value is 0.

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running.

  2. Change the rotation time limit by using the set-log-attributes subcommand, specifying the following attribute and the desired limit in minutes:

    org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.minutes=minutes
  3. Changes will be applied automatically after saving the change to the instance’s logging.properties file.

Example 7-13 Changing the Rotation Interval

The following example sets the log file rotation time limit for the cluster Cluster1, and all it’s instances.

asadmin set-log-attributes --target Cluster1 \
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.minutes=60

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.limit.minutes logging attribute value set to 60.
The logging attributes are saved successfully for cluster-config.

Command set-log-attributes executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set-log-attributes at the command line.

To Change the Limit Number of Archive Log Files

Use the set-log-attributes subcommand in remote mode to change the limit on the number of log files that the server creates to store old log messages. The default target of this subcommand is the DAS. Optionally, you can target a configuration, server, instance, or cluster. The default limit value is 0, which results in no limit placed on the number of rotated log files that are retained.

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running.

  2. Change the limit number of retained log files by using the set-log-attributes subcommand, specifying the following attribute and the desired file limit number:

    org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.maxArchiveFiles=number
  3. Changes will be applied automatically after saving the change to the instance’s effective logging.properties file.

Example 7-14 Changing the Limit Number of Archived Log Files

The following example sets the log limit number of retained log files for the DAS to 10.

asadmin set-log-attributes \
org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.maxArchiveFiles=10

org.glassfish.main.jul.handler.GlassFishLogHandler.rotation.maxArchiveFiles logging attribute value set to 10.
The logging attributes are saved successfully for server.

Command set-log-attributes executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set-log-attributes at the command line.

To Rotate Log Files Manually

You can rotate log files manually by using the rotate-log subcommand in remote mode. The default target of this subcommand is the DAS. Optionally, you can target a configuration, server, instance, or cluster. When you use this subcommand, the target log file is immediately moved to a new time-stamped file and a new log file is created.

Because log rotation is a dynamic operation, you do not need to restart Eclipse GlassFish for changes to take effect.

  1. Ensure that the target server or cluster is running.

  2. Rotate log files by using the rotate-log subcommand.

Example 7-15 Rotating Log Files Manually

The following example rotates the server.log file for ManagedServer2 to server.log_yyyy-mm-dd`T`hh-mm-ss, where yyyy-mm-dd`T`hh-mm-ss represents the time when the file is rotated, and creates a new server.log file.

asadmin rotate-log --target ManagedServer2
Rotated log on instance named 'ManagedServer2'.
Command rotate-log executed successfully.

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help rotate-log at the command line.

Viewing Log Records

The recommended means for general viewing of logging information is to use the Log Viewer in the Administration Console. The Log Viewer simplifies reading, searching, and filtering log file contents. For instructions, see the Administration Console online help.

Eclipse GlassFish also allows you to collect log files into a ZIP archive, which provides the means to obtain and view log files for an instance or cluster even when it is not currently running. The following section explains how to collect all available log files for an instance or cluster and compile them into a single ZIP archive, which is done by using the collect-log-files subcommand.

To Collect Log Files into a ZIP Archive

Use the collect-log-files subcommand in remote mode to collect log files into a ZIP archive. The default target of this subcommand is the DAS. Optionally you can target a configuration, server, instance, or cluster.

  1. Ensure that the target server or cluster is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Use the collect-log-files subcommand to create the ZIP archive.

    The default location in which the ZIP archive is created is the domain-dir/collected-logs directory. The collect-log-files subcommand allows you to specify a nondefault directory in which the ZIP archive is to be created by using the --retrieve option set to true, followed by the directory name.

    The name of the ZIP file contains the timestamp, as follows:

    log_yyyy-mm-dd_hh-min-sec.zip

Example 7-16 Collecting and Downloading Log Files as a ZIP File

This example shows collecting the log files for the cluster Cluster1 and compiling them into a ZIP archive in the /tmp/space/output directory.

asadmin collect-log-files --target Cluster1 --retrieve true /tmp/space/output
Log files are downloaded for ClusterServer1.
Log files are downloaded for ClusterServer2.
Created Zip file under /tmp/space/output/log_2022-08-06_14-57-53.zip.
Command collect-log-files executed successfully.

When the ZIP file created by the preceding command is uncompressed, the following directory structure is created:

as-install-parent/
  glassfish/
    domains/
      domain-dir/
        collected_logs/
          logs/
            ClusterServer1/
              server.log
            ClusterServer2/
              server.log

See Also

You can view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help collect-log-files at the command line.

Listing Loggers

You can list and view information about all public loggers in your distribution of Eclipse GlassFish.

To List Loggers

Use the list-loggers subcommand in remote mode to list the logger name, subsystem, and description of subsystem loggers in your distribution of Eclipse GlassFish. Class name based loggers are not listed.

  1. Ensure that the DAS is running. Remote commands require a running server.

  2. List loggers by using the list-loggers subcommand.

Example 7-17 Listing Loggers

This example lists the logger name, subsystem, and description for each logger. Some lines of output are omitted from this example for readability.

asadmin list-loggers
Logger Name                                  Subsystem               Logger Description
...
jakarta.enterprise.system.core                CORE                   Core Kernel
jakarta.enterprise.system.core.ee             AS-CORE                Jakarta EE Core Kernel
jakarta.enterprise.system.core.security       SECURITY               Core Security
jakarta.enterprise.system.core.security.web   SECURITY               Core-ee Security Logger
jakarta.enterprise.system.jmx                 JMX                    JMX System Logger
jakarta.enterprise.system.security.ssl        SECURITY - SSL         Security - SSL
...
Command list-loggers executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-loggers at the command line.

As an alternative you can take a look into the default-logging.properties file which should contain all useful basic loggers set to a default level. The same cofiguration is distributed in the new domain1’s logging.properties file, so you can print all actual logger names and levels as we described in To List Logger Levels.

8 Administering the Monitoring Service

This chapter explains how to monitor the Eclipse GlassFish 7 components and services by using the asadmin command-line utility. Instructions for configuring JConsole to monitor Eclipse GlassFish resources are also provided.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for monitoring by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

For information on using REST interfaces for monitoring, see Using REST Interfaces to Administer Eclipse GlassFish.

About Monitoring

Monitoring is the process of reviewing the statistics of a system to improve performance or solve problems. The monitoring service can track and display operational statistics, such as the number of requests per second, the average response time, and the throughput. By monitoring the state of various components and services deployed in Eclipse GlassFish, you can identify performance bottlenecks, predict failures, perform root cause analysis, and ensure that everything is functioning as expected. Data gathered by monitoring can also be useful in performance tuning and capacity planning.

For this release of Eclipse GlassFish, monitoring is exposed in a modular way so that many client modules can access and display the monitoring statistics. These clients include the Administration Console, the asadmin utility, AMX, and REST interfaces.

The following topics are addressed here:

How the Monitoring Tree Structure Works

A monitorable object is a component, subcomponent, or service that can be monitored. Eclipse GlassFish uses a tree structure to track monitorable objects. Because the tree is dynamic, the tree changes as Eclipse GlassFish components are added or removed.

In the tree, a monitorable object can have child objects (nodes) that represent exactly what can be monitored for that object. All child objects are addressed using the dot (.) character as a separator. These constructed names are referred to as dotted names. Detailed information on dotted names is available in the dotted-names(5ASC) help page.

The following command lists the monitorable child objects of the instance server:

asadmin> list --monitor "server.*"

server.applications
server.connector-service
server.http-service
server.jms-service
server.jvm
server.network
server.orb
server.resources
server.security
server.thread-pool
server.transaction-service
server.web

Each object is represented by a dotted name. Dotted names can also address specific attributes in monitorable objects. For example, the jvm object has a memory attribute with a statistic called maxheapsize. The following dotted name addresses the attribute:

server.jvm.memory.maxheapsize

Although an object is monitorable, it is not necessarily being actively monitored. For instructions on activating monitoring, see Configuring Monitoring.

Tree Structure of Monitorable Objects

Each monitorable object has a hierarchical tree structure. In the tree, a replaceable such as *statistics represents the name of the attribute that you can show statistics for.

The following node tree hierarchies are addressed here:

Applications Tree Hierarchy

The applications tree contains the following nodes:

server.applications
   |--- application1
   |    |--- ejb-module-1
   |    |        |--- ejb1 *
   |    |                  |--- bean-cache (for entity/sfsb) *
   |    |                  |--- bean-pool (for slsb/mdb/entity) *
   |    |                  |--- bean-methods
   |    |                       |---method1 *
   |    |                       |---method2 *
   |    |                  |--- timers (for s1sb/entity/mdb) *
   |    |--- web-module-1
   |    |        |--- virtual-server-1 *
   |    |                       |---servlet1  *
   |    |                       |---servlet2  *
   |--- standalone-web-module-1
   |    |        |----- virtual-server-2 *
   |    |                       |---servlet3 *
   |    |                       |---servlet4 *
   |    |        |----- virtual-server-3 *
   |    |                       |---servlet3 *(same servlet on different vs)
   |    |                       |---servlet5 *
   |--- standalone-ejb-module-1
   |    |        |--- ejb2 *
   |    |                  |--- bean-cache (for entity/sfsb) *
   |    |                  |--- bean-pool (for slsb/mdb/entity) *
   |    |                  |--- bean-methods
   |    |                       |--- method1 *
   |    |                       |--- method2 *
   |    |                  |--- timers (for s1sb/entity/mdb) *
   |--- jersey-application-1
   |    |--- jersey
   |    |        |--- resources
                           resource-0
                               hitcount
                                    *statistic
   |--- application2

An example dotted name might be:

server.applications.hello.server.request.maxtime

An example dotted name under the EJB method node might be:

server.applications.ejbsfapp1.ejbsfapp1ejbmod1\.jar.SFApp1EJB1

An example Jersey dotted name might be:

server.applications.helloworld-webapp.jersey.resources.resource-0.hitcount.resourcehitcount-count

For available statistics, see EJB Statistics, Jersey Statistics, and Web Statistics.

Connector Service Tree Hierarchy

The connector-service tree holds monitorable attributes for pools such as the connector connection pool. The connector-service tree contains the following nodes:

server.connector-service
        resource-adapter-1
             connection-pools
                  pool-1
             work-management

An example dotted name might be server.connector-service.resource-adapter-1.connection-pools.pool-1. For available statistics, see JMS/Connector Service Statistics.

HTTP Service Tree Hierarchy

The http-service tree contains the following nodes:

server.http-service
       virtual-server
           request
               *statistic
       _asadmin
           request
               *statistic

An example dotted name under the virutal-server node might be server.http-service.virtual-server1.request.requestcount. For available statistics, see HTTP Service Statistics.

JMS/Container Service Tree Hierarchy

The jms-service tree holds monitorable attributes for connection factories (connection pools for resource adapters) and work management (for Message Queue resource adapters). The jms-service tree contains the following nodes:

server.jms-service
        connection-factories
             connection-factory-1
        work-management

An example dotted name under the connection-factories node might be server.jms-service.connection-factories.connection-factory-1 which shows all the statistics for this connection factory. For available statistics, see JMS/Connector Service Statistics.

JVM Tree Hierarchy

The jvm tree contains the following nodes:

server.jvm
           class-loading-system
           compilation-system
           garbage-collectors
           memory
           operating-system
           runtime

An example dotted name under the memory node might be server.jvm.memory.maxheapsize. For available statistics, see JVM Statistics.

Network Tree Hierarchy

The network statistics apply to the network listener, such as admin-listener, http-listener-1, ttp-listener-2. The network tree contains the following nodes:

server.network
          type-of-listener
              keep-alive
                    *statistic
              file-cache
                    *statistic
              thread-pool
                    *statistic
              connection-queue
                     *statistic

An example dotted name under the network node might be server.network.admin-listener.keep-alive.maxrequests-count. For available statistics, see Network Statistics.

ORB Tree Hierarchy

The orb tree holds monitorable attributes for connection managers. The orb tree contains the following nodes:

server.orb
    transport
        connectioncache
            inbound
                *statistic
            outbound
                *statistic

An example dotted name might be server.orb.transport.connectioncache.inbound.connectionsidle-count. For available statistics, see ORB Statistics (Connection Manager).

Resources Tree Hierarchy

The resources tree holds monitorable attributes for pools such as the JDBC connection pool and connector connection pool. The resources tree contains the following nodes:

server.resources
       connection-pool
           request
               *statistic

An example dotted name might be server.resources.jdbc-connection-pool1.numconnfree.count. For available statistics, see Resource Statistics (Connection Pool).

Security Tree Hierarchy

The security tree contains the following nodes:

server.security
       ejb
          *statistic
       web
          *statistic
       realm
          *statistic

An example dotted name might be server.security.realm.realmcount-starttime. For available statistics, see Security Statistics.

Thread Pool Tree Hierarchy

The thread-pool tree holds monitorable attributes for connection managers, and contains the following nodes:

server.thread-pool
                orb
                    threadpool
                            thread-pool-1
                                *statistic

An example dotted name might be server.thread-pool.orb.threadpool.thread-pool-1.averagetimeinqueue-current. For available statistics, see Thread Pool Statistics.

Transactions Service Tree Hierarchy

The transaction-service tree holds monitorable attributes for the transaction subsystem for the purpose of rolling back transactions. The transaction-service tree contains the following nodes:

server.transaction-service
         statistic

An example dotted name might be server.tranaction-service.activeids. For available statistics, see Transaction Service Statistics.

Web Tree Hierarchy

The web tree contains the following nodes:

server.web
           jsp
              *statistic
           servlet
              *statistic
           session
              *statistic
           request
              *statistic

An example dotted name for the servlet node might be server.web.servlet.activeservletsloadedcount. For available statistics, see Web Module Common Statistics.

About Monitoring for Add-on Components

An add-on component typically generates statistics that Eclipse GlassFish can gather at runtime. Adding monitoring capabilities enables an add-on component to provide statistics to Eclipse GlassFish in the same way as components that are supplied in the Eclipse GlassFish distributions. As a result, you can use the same administrative interfaces to monitor statistics from any installed Eclipse GlassFish component, regardless of the origin of the component.

Tools for Monitoring Eclipse GlassFish

The following asadmin subcommands are provided for monitoring the services and components of Eclipse GlassFish:

Configuring Monitoring

By default, the monitoring service is enabled for Eclipse GlassFish, but monitoring for the individual modules is not. To enable monitoring for a module, you change the monitoring level for that module to LOW or HIGH, You can choose to leave monitoring OFF for objects that do not need to be monitored.

  • LOW. Simple statistics, such as create count, byte count, and so on

  • HIGH. Simple statistics plus method statistics, such as method count, duration, and so on

  • OFF. No monitoring, no impact on performance

The following tasks are addressed here:

To Enable Monitoring

Use the enable-monitoring subcommand to enable the monitoring service itself, or to enable monitoring for individual modules. Monitoring is immediately activated, without restarting Eclipse GlassFish.

You can also use the set subcommand to enable monitoring for a module. Using the set command is not a dynamic procedure, so you need to restart Eclipse GlassFish for your changes to take effect.

  1. Determine which services and components are currently enabled for monitoring.

    asadmin> get server.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.*

    This example output shows that the HTTP service is not enabled (OFF for monitoring), but other objects are enabled:

    configs.config.server-config.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.web-container=HIGH
           configs.config.server-config.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.http-service=OFF
               configs.config.server-config.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.jvm=HIGH
  2. Enable monitoring by using the oenable-monitoring subcommand.

    Server restart is not required.

Example 8-1 Enabling the Monitoring Service Dynamically

This example enables the monitoring service without affecting monitoring for individual modules.

asadmin> enable-monitoring
Command enable-monitoring executed successfully

Example 8-2 Enabling Monitoring for Modules Dynamically

This example enables monitoring for the ejb-container module.

asadmin> enable-monitoring --level ejb-container=HIGH
Command enable-monitoring executed successfully

Example 8-3 Enabling Monitoring for Modules by Using the set Subcommand

This example enables monitoring for the HTTP service by setting the monitoring level to HIGH (you must restart the server for changes to take effect).

asadmin> set server.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.http-service=HIGH
Command set executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help enable-monitoring at the command line.

To Disable Monitoring

Use the disable-monitoring subcommand to disable the monitoring service itself, or to disable monitoring for individual modules. Monitoring is immediately stopped, without restarting Eclipse GlassFish.

You can also use the set subcommand to disable monitoring for a module. Using the set command is not a dynamic procedure, so you need to restart Eclipse GlassFish for your changes to take effect.

  1. Determine which services and components currently are enabled for monitoring.

    asadmin get server.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.*

    This example output shows that monitoring is enabled for web-container, http-service, and jvm:

    configs.config.server-config.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.web-container=HIGH
           configs.config.server-config.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.http-service=HIGH
                  configs.config.server-config.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.jvm=HIGH
  2. Disable monitoring for a service or module by using the disable-monitoring subcommand.

    Server restart is not required.

Example 8-4 Disabling the Monitoring Service Dynamically

This example disables the monitoring service without changing the monitoring levels for individual modules.

asadmin> disable-monitoring
Command disable-monitoring executed successfully

Example 8-5 Disabling Monitoring for Modules Dynamically

This example disables monitoring for specific modules. Their monitoring levels are set to OFF.

asadmin> disable-monitoring --modules web-container,ejb-container
Command disable-monitoring executed successfully

Example 8-6 Disabling Monitoring by Using the set Subcommand

This example disables monitoring for the HTTP service (you must restart the server for changes to take effect).

asadmin> set server.monitoring-service.module-monitoring-levels.http-service=OFF
Command set executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help disable-monitoring at the command line.

Viewing Common Monitoring Data

Use the monitor subcommand to display basic data on commonly-monitored objects.

To View Common Monitoring Data

Use the --type option of the monitor subcommand to specify the object for which you want to display data, such as httplistener, jvm, webmodule. If you use the monitor subcommand without specifying a type, an error message is displayed.

Output from the subcommand is displayed continuously in a tabular format. The --interval option can be used to display output at a particular interval (the default is 30 seconds).

Before You Begin

A monitorable object must be configured for monitoring before you can display data on the object. See To Enable Monitoring.

  1. Determine which type of monitorable object you want to monitor.

    Your choices for 5.0 are jvm, httplistener, and webmodule.

  2. Request the monitoring data by using the monitor subcommand.

Example 8-7 Viewing Common Monitoring Data

This example requests common data for type jvm on instance server.

asadmin> monitor --type jvm server

UpTime(ms)                          Heap and NonHeap Memory(bytes)
current                   min        max        low        high       count

9437266                   8585216    619642880  0          0          93093888
9467250                   8585216    619642880  0          0          93093888

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help monitor at the command line.

Common Monitoring Statistics

Common monitoring statistics are described in the following sections:

HTTP Listener Common Statistics

The statistics available for the httplistener type are shown in the following table.

Table 8-1 HTTP Listener Common Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Description

ec

Error count. Cumulative value of the error count

mt

Maximum time. Longest response time for a request; not a cumulative value, but the largest response time from among the response times

pt

Processing time. Cumulative value of the times taken to process each request, with processing time being the average of request processing times over request

rc

Request count. Cumulative number of requests processed so far

JVM Common Statistics

The statistics available for the jvm type are shown in the following table.

Table 8-2 JVM Common Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Description

count

Amount of memory (in bytes) that is guaranteed to be available for use by the JVM machine

high

Retained for compatibility with other releases

low

Retained for compatibility with other releases

max

The maximum amount of memory that can be used for memory management.

min

Initial amount of memory (in bytes) that the JVM machine requests from the operating system for memory management during startup

UpTime

Number of milliseconds that the JVM machine has been running since it was last started

Web Module Common Statistics

The statistics available for the webmodule type are shown in the following table.

Table 8-3 Web Module Common Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Description

ajlc

Number of active JavaServer Pages (JSP) technology pages that are loaded

asc

Current active sessions

aslc

Number of active servlets that are loaded

ast

Total active sessions

mjlc

Maximum number of JSP pages that are loaded

mslc

Maximum number of servlets that are loaded

rst

Total rejected sessions

st

Total sessions

tjlc

Total number of JSP pages that are loaded

tslc

Total number of servlets that are loaded

Viewing Comprehensive Monitoring Data

By applying the list and get subcommands against the tree structure using dotted names, you can display more comprehensive monitoring data, such as a description of each of the statistics and its unit of measurement.

The following topics are addressed here:

Guidelines for Using the list and get Subcommands for Monitoring

The underlying assumptions for using the list and get subcommands with dotted names are:

  • A list subcommand that specifies a dotted name that is not followed by a wildcard (*) lists the current node’s immediate children. For example, the following subcommand lists all immediate children belonging to the server node:

    list --monitor server
  • A list subcommand that specifies a dotted name followed by a wildcard of the form .* lists a hierarchical tree of child nodes from the specified node. For example, the following subcommand lists all children of the applications node, their subsequent child nodes, and so on:

    list --monitor server.applications.*
  • A list subcommand that specifies a dotted name preceded or followed by a wildcard of the form *dottedname or dotted * name or dottedname * lists all nodes and their children that match the regular expression created by the specified matching pattern.

  • A get subcommand followed by a . or a gets the set of attributes and their values that belong to the node specified.

For example, the following table explains the output of the list and get subcommands used with the dotted name for the resources node.

Table 8-4 Example Resources Level Dotted Names

Subcommand Dotted Name Output

list --monitor

server.resources

List of pool names.

list --monitor

server.resources.``connection-pool1

No attributes, but a message saying "Use get subcommand with the --monitor option to view this node’s attributes and values."

get --monitor

server.resources.``connection-pool1.*

List of attributes and values corresponding to connection pool attributes.

For detailed information on dotted names, see the dotted-names(5ASC) help page.

To View Comprehensive Monitoring Data

Although the monitor subcommand is useful in many situations, it does not offer the complete list of all monitorable objects. To work with comprehensive data for an object type, use the list monitor and the get monitor subcommands followed by the dotted name of a monitorable object.

Before You Begin

A monitorable object must be configured for monitoring before you can display information about the object. See To Enable Monitoring if needed.

  1. List the objects that are enabled for monitoring by using the list subcommand.

    For example, the following subcommand lists all components and services that have monitoring enabled for instance server.

    asadmin> list --monitor "*"
    server.web
    server.connector-service
    server.orb
    server.jms-serviceserver.jvm
    server.applications
    server.http-service
    server.thread-pools
  2. Get data for a monitored component or service by using the get subcommand.

Example 8-8 Viewing Attributes for a Specific Type

This example gets information about all the attributes for object type jvm on instance server.

asadmin> get --monitor server.jvm.*
server.jvm.class-loading-system.loadedclasscount = 3715
server.jvm.class-loading-system.totalloadedclasscount = 3731
server.jvm.class-loading-system.unloadedclasscount = 16
server.jvm.compilation-system.name-current = HotSpot Client Compiler
server.jvm.compilation-system.totalcompilationtime = 769
server.jvm.garbage-collectors.Copy.collectioncount = 285
server.jvm.garbage-collectors.Copy.collectiontime = 980
server.jvm.garbage-collectors.MarkSweepCompact.collectioncount = 2
server.jvm.garbage-collectors.MarkSweepCompact.collectiontime = 383
server.jvm.memory.committedheapsize = 23498752
server.jvm.memory.committednonheapsize = 13598720
server.jvm.memory.initheapsize = 0
server.jvm.memory.initnonheapsize = 8585216
server.jvm.memory.maxheapsize = 66650112
server.jvm.memory.maxnonheapsize = 100663296
server.jvm.memory.objectpendingfinalizationcount = 0
server.jvm.memory.usedheapsize = 19741184
server.jvm.memory.usednonheapsize = 13398352
server.jvm.operating-system.arch-current = x86
server.jvm.operating-system.availableprocessors = 2
server.jvm.operating-system.name-current = Windows XP
server.jvm.operating-system.version-current = 5.1
server.jvm.runtime.classpath-current = glassfish.jar
server.jvm.runtime.inputarguments-current = []
server.jvm.runtime.managementspecversion-current = 1.0
server.jvm.runtime.name-current = 4372@ABBAGANI_WORK
server.jvm.runtime.specname-current = Java Virtual Machine Specification
server.jvm.runtime.specvendor-current = Sun Microsystems Inc.
server.jvm.runtime.specversion-current = 1.0
server.jvm.runtime.uptime = 84813
server.jvm.runtime.vmname-current = Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM
server.jvm.runtime.vmvendor-current = Sun Microsystems Inc.
server.jvm.runtime.vmversion-current = 1.5.0_11-b03

Example 8-9 Viewing Monitorable Applications

This example lists all the monitorable applications for instance server.

asadmin> list --monitor server.applications.*
server.applications.app1
server.applications.app2
server.applications.app1.virtual-server1
server.applications.app2.virtual-server1

Example 8-10 Viewing Attributes for an Application

This example gets information about all the attributes for application hello.

asadmin> get --monitor server.applications.hello.*
server.applications.hello.server.activatedsessionstotal = 0
server.applications.hello.server.activejspsloadedcount = 1
server.applications.hello.server.activeservletsloadedcount = 1
server.applications.hello.server.activesessionscurrent = 1
server.applications.hello.server.activesessionshigh = 1
server.applications.hello.server.errorcount = 0
server.applications.hello.server.expiredsessionstotal = 0
server.applications.hello.server.maxjspsloadedcount = 1
server.applications.hello.server.maxservletsloadedcount = 0
server.applications.hello.server.maxtime = 0
server.applications.hello.server.passivatedsessionstotal = 0
server.applications.hello.server.persistedsessionstotal = 0
server.applications.hello.server.processingtime = 0.0
server.applications.hello.server.rejectedsessionstotal = 0
server.applications.hello.server.requestcount = 0
server.applications.hello.server.sessionstotal =
server.applications.hello.server.totaljspsloadedcount = 0
server.applications.hello.server.totalservletsloadedcount = 0

Example 8-11 Viewing a Specific Attribute

This example gets information about the jvm attribute runtime.vmversion-current on instance server.

asadmin> get --monitor server.jvm.runtime.vmversion-current
server.jvm.runtime.vmversion-current = 10.0-b23

Comprehensive Monitoring Statistics

You can get comprehensive monitoring statistics by forming a dotted name that specifies the statistic you are looking for. For example, the following dotted name will display the cumulative number of requests for the HTTP service on virtual-server1:

server.http-service.virtual-server1.request.requestcount

The tables in the following sections list the statistics that are available for each monitorable object:

EJB Statistics

EJBs fit into the tree of objects as shown in Applications Tree Hierarchy. Use the following dotted name pattern to get EJB statistics for an application:

server.applications.appname.ejbmodulename.ejbname.bean-cache.statistic

EJB statistics for an application are available after the application is executed. If the application is deployed but has not yet been executed, all counts will show default values. When the application is undeployed, all its monitoring data is lost.

Statistics available for applications are shown in the following sections:

EJB Cache Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for EJB cache statistics:

server.applications.appname.ejbmodulename.bean-cache.ejbname.statistic

The statistics available for EJB caches are listed in the following table.

Table 8-5 EJB Cache Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

cachemisses

RangeStatistic

The number of times a user request does not find a bean in the cache.

cachehits

RangeStatistic

The number of times a user request found an entry in the cache.

numbeansincache

RangeStatistic

The number of beans in the cache. This is the current size of the cache.

numpassivations

CountStatistic

Number of passivated beans. Applies only to stateful session beans.

numpassivationerrors

CountStatistic

Number of errors during passivation. Applies only to stateful session beans.

numexpiredsessionsremoved

CountStatistic

Number of expired sessions removed by the cleanup thread. Applies only to stateful session beans.

numpassivationsuccess

CountStatistic

Number of times passivation completed successfully. Applies only to stateful session beans.

EJB Container Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for EJB container statistics:

server.applications.appname.ejbmodulename.container.ejbname

The statistics available for EJB containers are listed in the following table.

Table 8-6 EJB Container Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

createcount

CountStatistic

Number of times an EJB’s create method is called.

messagecount

CountStatistic

Number of messages received for a message-driven bean.

methodreadycount

RangeStatistic

Number of stateful or stateless session beans that are in the MethodReady state.

passivecount

RangeStatistic

Number of stateful session beans that are in Passive state.

pooledcount

RangeStatistic

Number of entity beans in pooled state.

readycount

RangeStatistic

Number of entity beans in ready state.

removecount

CountStatistic

Number of times an EJB’s remove method is called.

EJB Method Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for EJB method statistics:

server.applications.appname.ejbmodulename.bean-methods.ejbname.statistic

The statistics available for EJB method invocations are listed in the following table.

Table 8-7 EJB Method Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

executiontime

CountStatistic

Time, in milliseconds, spent executing the method for the last successful/unsuccessful attempt to run the operation. This is collected for stateless and stateful session beans and entity beans if monitoring is enabled on the EJB container.

methodstatistic

TimeStatistic

Number of times an operation is called; the total time that is spent during the invocation, and so on.

totalnumerrors

CountStatistic

Number of times the method execution resulted in an exception. This is collected for stateless and stateful session beans and entity beans if monitoring is enabled for the EJB container.

totalnumsuccess

CountStatistic

Number of times the method successfully executed. This is collected for stateless and stateful session beans and entity beans if monitoring enabled is true for EJB container.

EJB Pool Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for EJB pool statistics:

server.applications.appname.ejbmodulename.bean-pool.ejbname.statistic

The statistics available for EJB pools are listed in the following table.

Table 8-8 EJB Pool Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

jmsmaxmessagesload

CountStatistic

The maximum number of messages to load into a JMS session at one time for a message-driven bean to serve. Default is 1. Applies only to pools for message driven beans.

numbeansinpool

RangeStatistic

Number of EJBs in the associated pool, providing information about how the pool is changing.

numthreadswaiting

RangeStatistic

Number of threads waiting for free beans, giving an indication of possible congestion of requests.

totalbeanscreated

CountStatistic

Number of beans created in associated pool since the gathering of data started.

totalbeansdestroyed

CountStatistic

Number of beans destroyed from associated pool since the gathering of data started.

Timer Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for timer statistics:

server.applications.appname.ejbmodulename.timers.ejbname.statistic

The statistics available for timers are listed in the following table.

Table 8-9 Timer Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

numtimerscreated

CountStatistic

Number of timers created in the system.

numtimersdelivered

CountStatistic

Number of timers delivered by the system.

numtimersremoved

CountStatistic

Number of timers removed from the system.

HTTP Service Statistics

The HTTP service fits into the tree of objects as shown in HTTP Service Tree Hierarchy.

HTTP Service Virtual Server Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for HTTP service virtual server statistics:

server.http-service.virtual-server.request.statistic

The HTTP service statistics for virtual servers are shown in the following table.

Table 8-10 HTTP Service Virtual Server Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

count200

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal to 200

count2xx

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code in the 2xx range

count302

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal to 302

count304

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal to 304

count3xx

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal in the 3xx range

count400

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal to 400

count401

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal to 401

count403

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal to 403

count404

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal to 404

count4xx

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal in the 4xx range

count503

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal to 503

count5xx

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code equal in the 5xx range

countother

CountStatistic

Number of responses with a status code outside the 2xx, 3xx, 4xx, and 5xx range

errorcount

CountStatistic

Cumulative value of the error count, with error count representing the number of cases where the response code was greater than or equal to 400

hosts

StringStatistic

The host (alias) names of the virtual server

maxtime

CountStatistic

Longest response time for a request; not a cumulative value, but the largest response time from among the response times

processingtime

CountStatistic

Cumulative value of the times taken to process each request, with processing time being the average of request processing times over the request count

requestcount

CountStatistic

Cumulative number of requests processed so far

state

StringStatistic

The state of the virtual server

Jersey Statistics

Jersey fits into the tree of objects as shown in Applications Tree Hierarchy.

Use the following dotted name pattern for Jersey statistics:

server.applications.jersey-application.jersey.resources.resource-0.hitcount.statistic

The statistics available for Jersey are shown in the following table.

Table 8-11 Jersey Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

resourcehitcount

CountStatistic

Number of hits on this resource class

rootresourcehitcount

CountStatistic

Number of hits on this root resource class

JMS/Connector Service Statistics

The JMS/Connector Service fits into the tree of objects as shown in JMS/Container Service Tree Hierarchy.

JMS/Connector Service statistics are shown in the following sections:

Connector Connection Pool Statistics (JMS)

Use the following dotted name pattern for JMS/Connector Service connection pool statistics:

server.connector-service.resource-adapter-1.connection-pool.statistic

JMS/Connector Service statistics available for the connector connection pools are shown in the following table.

In order to improve system performance, connection pools are initialized lazily; that is, a pool is not initialized until an application first uses the pool or the pool is explicitly pinged. Monitoring statistics for a connection pool are not available until the pool is initialized.

Table 8-12 Connector Connection Pool Monitoring Statistics (JMS)

Statistic Data Type Description

averageconnwaittime

CountStatistic

Average wait time of connections before they are serviced by the connection pool.

connectionrequestwaittime

RangeStatistic

The longest and shortest wait times of connection requests. The current value indicates the wait time of the last request that was serviced by the pool.

numconnfailedvalidation

CountStatistic

Total number of connections in the connection pool that failed validation from the start time until the last sample time.

numconnused

RangeStatistic

Total number of connections that are currently being used, as well as information about the maximum number of connections that were used (the high water mark).

numconnfree

RangeStatistic

Total number of free connections in the pool as of the last sampling.

numconntimedout

CountStatistic

Total number of connections in the pool that timed out between the start time and the last sample time.

numconncreated

CountStatistic

Number of physical connections, in milliseconds, that were created since the last reset.

numconndestroyed

CountStatistic

Number of physical connections that were destroyed since the last reset.

numconnacquired

CountStatistic

Number of logical connections acquired from the pool.

numconnreleased

CountStatistic

Number of logical connections released to the pool.

waitqueuelenght

CountStatistic

Number of connection requests in the queue waiting to be serviced.

Connector Work Management Statistics (JMS)

Use the following dotted name pattern for JMS/Connector Service work management statistics:

server.connector-service.resource-adapter-1.work-management.statistic

JMS/Connector Service statistics available for connector work management are listed in the following table.

Table 8-13 Connector Work Management Monitoring Statistics (JMS)

Statistic Data Type Description

activeworkcount

RangeStatistic

Number of work objects executed by the connector.

completedworkcount

CountStatistic

Number of work objects that were completed.

rejectedworkcount

CountStatistic

Number of work objects rejected by the Eclipse GlassFish.

submittedworkcount

CountStatistic

Number of work objects submitted by a connector module.

waitqueuelength

RangeStatistic

Number of work objects waiting in the queue before executing.

workrequestwaittime

RangeStatistic

Longest and shortest wait of a work object before it gets executed.

JVM Statistics

The JVM fits into the tree of objects as show in JVM Tree Hierarchy.

The statistics that are available for the Virtual Machine for Java platform (Java Virtual Machine) or JVM machine are shown in the following sections:

JVM Class Loading System Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for JVM class loading system statistics:

server.jvm.class-loading-system.statistic

With Java SE, additional monitoring information can be obtained from the JVM. Set the monitoring level to LOW to enable the display of this additional information. Set the monitoring level to HIGH to also view information pertaining to each live thread in the system. More information about the additional monitoring features for Java SE is available in Monitoring and Management for the Java Platform .

The Java SE monitoring tools are discussed at http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/technotes/tools/.

The statistics that are available for class loading in the JVM for Java SE are shown in the following table.

Table 8-14 JVM Monitoring Statistics for Java SE Class Loading

Statistic Data Type Description

loadedclasscount

CountStatistic

Number of classes that are currently loaded in the JVM

totalloadedclasscount

CountStatistic

Total number of classes that have been loaded since the JVM began execution

unloadedclasscount

CountStatistic

Number of classes that have been unloaded from the JVM since the JVM began execution

The statistics available for threads in the JVM in Java SE are shown in the following table.

Table 8-15 JVM Monitoring Statistics for Java SE - Threads

Statistic Data Type Description

allthreadids

StringStatistic

List of all live thread ids.

currentthreadcputime

CountStatistic

CPU time for the current thread (in nanoseconds) if CPU time measurement is enabled. If CPU time measurement is disabled, returns -1.

daemonthreadcount

CountStatistic

Current number of live daemon threads.

monitordeadlockedthreads

StringStatistic

List of thread ids that are monitor deadlocked.

peakthreadcount

CountStatistic

Peak live thread count since the JVM started or the peak was reset.

threadcount

CountStatistic

Current number of live daemon and non-daemon threads.

totalstartedthreadcount

CountStatistic

Total number of threads created and/or started since the JVM started.

JVM Compilation System Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for JVM compilation system statistics:

server.jvm.compilation-system.statistic

The statistics that are available for compilation in the JVM for Java SE are shown in the following table.

Table 8-16 JVM Monitoring Statistics for Java SE Compilation

Statistic Data Type Description

name-current

StringStatistic

Name of the current compiler

totalcompilationtime

CountStatistic

Accumulated time (in milliseconds) spent in compilation

JVM Garbage Collectors Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for JVM garbage collectors statistics:

server.jvm.garbage-collectors.statistic

The statistics that are available for garbage collection in the JVM for Java SE are shown in the following table.

Table 8-17 JVM Monitoring Statistics for Java SE Garbage Collectors

Statistic Data Type Description

collectioncount

CountStatistic

Total number of collections that have occurred

collectiontime

CountStatistic

Accumulated time (in milliseconds) spent in collection

JVM Memory Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for JVM memory statistics:

server.jvm.memory.statistic

The statistics that are available for memory in the JVM for Java SE are shown in the following table.

Table 8-18 JVM Monitoring Statistics for Java SE Memory

Statistic Data Type Description

committedheapsize

CountStatistic

Amount of heap memory (in bytes) that is committed for the JVM to use

committednonheapsize

CountStatistic

Amount of non-heap memory (in bytes) that is committed for the JVM to use

initheapsize

CountStatistic

Size of the heap initially requested by the JVM

initnonheapsize

CountStatistic

Size of the non-heap area initially requested by the JVM

maxheapsize

CountStatistic

Maximum amount of heap memory (in bytes) that can be used for memory management

maxnonheapsize

CountStatistic

Maximum amount of non-heap memory (in bytes) that can be used for memory management

objectpendingfinalizationcount

CountStatistic

Approximate number of objects that are pending finalization

usedheapsize

CountStatistic

Size of the heap currently in use

usednonheapsize

CountStatistic

Size of the non-heap area currently in use

JVM Operating System Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for JVM operating system statistics:

server.jvm.operating-system.statistic

The statistics that are available for the operating system for the JVM machine in Java SE are shown in the following table.

Table 8-19 JVM Statistics for the Java SE Operating System

Statistic Data Type Description

arch-current

StringStatistic

Operating system architecture

availableprocessors

CountStatistic

Number of processors available to the JVM

name-current

StringStatistic

Operating system name

version-current

StringStatistic

Operating system version

JVM Runtime Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for JVM runtime statistics:

server.jvm.runtime.statistic

The statistics that are available for the runtime in the JVM runtime for Java SE are shown in the following table.

Table 8-20 JVM Monitoring Statistics for Java SE Runtime

Statistic Data Type Description

classpath-current

StringStatistic

Classpath that is used by the system class loader to search for class files

inputarguments-current

StringStatistic

Input arguments passed to the JVM; not including arguments to the main method

managementspecversion-current

StringStatistic

Management specification version implemented by the JVM

name-current

StringStatistic

Name representing the running JVM

specname-current

StringStatistic

JVM specification name

specvendor-current

StringStatistic

JVM specification vendor

specversion-current

StringStatistic

JVM specification version

uptime

CountStatistic

Uptime of the JVM (in milliseconds)

vmname-current

StringStatistic

JVM implementation name

vmvendor-current

StringStatistic

JVM implementation vendor

vmversion-current

StringStatistic

JVM implementation version

Network Statistics

Network fits into the tree of objects as shown in Network Tree Hierarchy.

Network statistics are described in the following sections:

Network Keep Alive Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for network keep alive statistics:

server.network.type-of-listener.keep-alive.statistic

Statistics available for network keep alive are shown in the following table.

Table 8-21 Network Keep Alive Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

countconnections

CountStatistic

Number of connections in keep-alive mode.

counttimeouts

CountStatistic

Number of keep-alive connections that timed out.

secondstimeouts

CountStatistic

Keep-alive timeout value in seconds.

maxrequests

CountStatistic

Maximum number of requests allowed on a single keep-alive connection.

countflushes

CountStatistic

Number of keep-alive connections that were closed.

counthits

CountStatistic

Number of requests received by connections in keep-alive mode.

countrefusals

CountStatistic

Number of keep-alive connections that were rejected.

Network Connection Queue Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for network connection queue statistics:

server.network.type-of-listener.connection-queue.statistic

Statistics available for network connection queue are shown in the following table.

Table 8-22 Network Connection Queue Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

countopenconnections

CountStatistic

The number of open/active connections

countoverflows

CountStatistic

Number of times the queue has been too full to accommodate a connection

countqueued

CountStatistic

Number of connections currently in the queue

countqueued15minutesaverage

CountStatistic

Average number of connections queued in the last 15 minutes

countqueued1minuteaverage

CountStatistic

Average number of connections queued in the last 1 minute

countqueued5minutesaverage

CountStatistic

Average number of connections queued in the last 5 minutes

counttotalconnections

CountStatistic

Total number of connections that have been accepted

counttotalqueued

CountStatistic

Total number of connections that have been queued

maxqueued

CountStatistic

Maximum size of the connection queue

peakqueued

CountStatistic

Largest number of connections that were in the queue simultaneously

tickstotalqueued

CountStatistic

(Unsupported) Total number of ticks that connections have spent in the queue

Network File Cache Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for network file cache statistics:

server.network.type-of-listener.file-cache.statistic

Statistics available for network file cache are shown in the following table.

Table 8-23 Network File Cache Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

contenthits

CountStatistic

Number of hits on cached file content

contentmisses

CountStatistic

Number of misses on cached file content

heapsize

CountStatistic

Current cache size in bytes

hits

CountStatistic

Number of cache lookup hits

infohits

CountStatistic

Number of hits on cached file info

infomisses

CountStatistic

Number of misses on cached file info

mappedmemorysize

CountStatistic

Size of mapped memory used for caching in bytes

maxheapsize

CountStatistic

Maximum heap space used for cache in bytes

maxmappedmemorysize

CountStatistic

Maximum memory map size used for caching in bytes

misses

CountStatistic

Number of cache lookup misses data type

opencacheentries

CountStatistic

Number of current open cache entries

Network Thread Pool Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for network thread pool statistics:

server.network.type-of-listener.thread-pool.statistic

Statistics available for network thread pool are shown in the following table.

Table 8-24 Network Thread Pool Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

corethreads

CountStatistic

Core number of threads in the thread pool

currentthreadcount

CountStatistic

Provides the number of request processing threads currently in the listener thread pool

currentthreadsbusy

CountStatistic

Provides the number of request processing threads currently in use in the listener thread pool serving requests

maxthreads

CountStatistic

Maximum number of threads allowed in the thread pool

totalexecutedtasks

CountStatistic

Provides the total number of tasks, which were executed by the thread pool

ORB Statistics (Connection Manager)

The ORB fits into the tree of objects as shown in ORB Tree Hierarchy.

Use the following dotted name patterns for ORB statistics:

server.orb.transport.connectioncache.inbound.statistic
server.orb.transport.connectioncache.outbound.statistic

The statistics available for the connection manager in an ORB are listed in the following table.

Table 8-25 ORB Monitoring Statistics (Connection Manager)

Statistic Data Type Description

connectionsidle

CountStatistic

Total number of connections that are idle to the ORB

connectionsinuse

CountStatistic

Total number of connections in use to the ORB

totalconnections

BoundedRangeStatistic

Total number of connections to the ORB

Resource Statistics (Connection Pool)

By monitoring connection pool resources you can measure performance and capture resource usage at runtime. Connections are expensive and frequently cause performance bottlenecks in applications. It is important to monitor how a connection pool is releasing and creating new connections and how many threads are waiting to retrieve a connection from a particular pool.

The connection pool resources fit into the tree of objects as shown in Resources Tree Hierarchy.

Use the following dotted name pattern for general connection pool statistics:

server.resources.pool-name.statistic

Use the following dotted name pattern for application-scoped connection pool statistics:

server.applications.application-name.resources.pool-name.statistic

Use the following dotted name pattern for module-scoped connection pool statistics:

server.applications.application-name.module-name.resources.pool-name.statistic

The connection pool statistics are shown in the following tables.

In order to improve system performance, connection pools are initialized lazily; that is, a pool is not initialized until an application first uses the pool or the pool is explicitly pinged. Monitoring statistics for a connection pool are not available until the pool is initialized.

Table 8-26 General Resource Monitoring Statistics (Connection Pool)

Statistic Data Type Description

averageconnwaittime

CountStatistic

Average wait-time-duration per successful connection request

connrequestwaittime

RangeStatistic

Longest and shortest wait times, in milliseconds, of connection requests since the last sampling. current value indicates the wait time of the last request that was serviced by the pool

numconnacquired

CountStatistic

Number of logical connections acquired from the pool since the last sampling

numconncreated

CountStatistic

Number of physical connections that were created by the pool since the last reset

numconndestroyed

CountStatistic

Number of physical connections that were destroyed since the last reset

numconnfailedvalidation

CountStatistic

Number of connections in the connection pool that failed validation from the start time until the last sampling time

numconnfree

RangeStatistic

Number of free connections in the pool as of the last sampling

numconnnotsuccessfullymatched

CountStatistic

Number of connections rejected during matching

numconnreleased

CountStatistic

Number of connections released back to the pool since the last sampling

numconnsuccessfullymatched

CountStatistic

Number of connections successfully matched

numconntimedout

CountStatistic

Number of connections in the pool that timed out between the start time and the last sampling time

numconnused

RangeStatistic

Number of connections that are currently being used, as well as information about the maximum number of connections that were used (high water mark)

frequsedsqlqueries

StringStatistic

List of the most frequently used SQL queries (Available only when SQL Tracing is enabled)

numpotentialconnleak

CountStatistic

Number of potential connection leaks

numpotentialstatementleak

CountStatistic

Number of potential statement leaks (Available only when Statement Leak Dectection is enabled)

numstatementcachehit

CountStatistic

Number of statements that were found in the statement cache (Available only when the Statement Cache is enabled)

numstatementcachemiss

CountStatistic

Number of statements that were not found in the statement cache (Available only when the Statement Cache is enabled)

waitqueuelength

CountStatistic

Number of connection requests in the queue waiting to be serviced

Table 8-27 Application Specific Resource Monitoring Statistics (Connection Pool)

Statistic Data Type Description

numconnacquired

CountStatistic

Number of logical connections acquired from the pool since the last sampling

numconnreleased

CountStatistic

Number of connections released back to the pool since the last sampling

numconnused

RangeStatistic

Number of connections that are currently being used, as well as information about the maximum number of connections that were used (high water mark)

Security Statistics

Security fits into the tree of objects as shown in Security Tree Hierarchy.

Statistics available for security are shown in the following sections:

EJB Security Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for EJB security statistics:

server.security.ejb.statistic

The statistics available for EJB security are listed in the following table.

Table 8-28 EJB Security Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

policyconfigurationcount

CountStatistic

Number of policy configuration

securitymanagercount

CountStatistic

Number of EJB security managers

Web Security Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for web security statistics:

server.security.web.statistic

The statistics available for web security are listed in the following table.

Table 8-29 Web Security Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

websecuritymanagercount

CountStatistic

Number of security managers

webpolicyconfigurationcount

CountStatistic

Number of policy configuration objects

Realm Security Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for realm security statistics:

server.security.realm.statistic

The statistics available for realm security are listed in the following table.

Table 8-30 Realm Security Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

realmcount

CountStatistic

Number of realms

Thread Pool Statistics

The thread pool fits into the tree of objects as shown in Thread Pool Tree Hierarchy.

The statistics available for thread pools are shown in the following sections:

Thread Pool Monitoring Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for thread pool statistics:

server.thread-pool.thread-pool.statistic

The statistics available for the thread pool are shown in the following table.

Table 8-31 Thread Pool Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

averagetimeinqueue

BoundedRangeStatistic

Average amount of time (in milliseconds) a request waited in the queue before being processed

averageworkcompletiontime

BoundedRangeStatistic

Average amount of time (in milliseconds) taken to complete an assignment

currentbusythreads

CountStatistic

Number of busy threads

currentnumberofthreads

BoundedRangeStatistic

Current number of request processing threads

numberofavailablethreads

CountStatistic

Number of available threads

numberofworkitemsinqueue

BoundedRangeStatistic

Current number of work items waiting in queue

totalworkitemsadded

CountStatistic

Total number of work items added to the work queue as of last sampling

JVM Statistics for Java SE - Thread Information

The statistics available for ThreadInfo in the JVM in Java SE are shown in the following table.

Table 8-32 JVM Monitoring Statistics for Java SE - Thread Info

Statistic Data Type Description

blockedcount

CountStatistic

Total number of times that the thread entered the BLOCKED state.

blockedtime

CountStatistic

Time elapsed (in milliseconds) since the thread entered the BLOCKED state. Returns -1 if thread contention monitoring is disabled.

lockname

StringStatistic

String representation of the monitor lock that the thread is blocked to enter or waiting to be notified through the Object.wait method.

lockownerid

CountStatistic

ID of the thread that holds the monitor lock of an object on which this thread is blocking.

lockownername

StringStatistic

Name of the thread that holds the monitor lock of the object this thread is blocking on.

stacktrace

StringStatistic

Stack trace associated with this thread.

threadid

CountStatistic

ID of the thread.

threadname

StringStatistic

Name of the thread.

threadstate

StringStatistic

State of the thread.

waitedtime

CountStatistic

Elapsed time (in milliseconds) that the thread has been in a WAITING state. Returns -1 if thread contention monitoring is disabled.

waitedcount

CountStatistic

Total number of times the thread was in WAITING or TIMED_WAITING states.

Transaction Service Statistics

The transaction service allows the client to freeze the transaction subsystem in order to roll back transactions and determine which transactions are in process at the time of the freeze. The transaction service fits into the tree of objects as shown in Transactions Service Tree Hierarchy.

Use the following dotted name pattern for transaction service statistics:

server.transaction-service.statistic

The statistics available for the transaction service are shown in the following table.

Table 8-33 Transaction Service Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

activecount

CountStatistic

Number of transactions currently active.

activeids

StringStatistic

The ID’s of the transactions that are currently active. Every such transaction can be rolled back after freezing the transaction service.

committedcount

CountStatistic

Number of transactions that have been committed.

rolledbackcount

CountStatistic

Number of transactions that have been rolled back.

state

StringStatistic

Indicates whether or not the transaction has been frozen.

Web Statistics

The web module fits into the tree of objects as shown in Web Tree Hierarchy.

The available web statistics shown in the following sections:

Web Module Servlet Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for web module servlet statistics:

server.applications.web-module.virtual-server.servlet.statistic
server.applications.application.web-module.virtual-server.servlet.statistic

The available web module servlet statistics are shown in the following table.

Table 8-34 Web Module Servlet Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

errorcount

CountStatistic

Cumulative number of cases where the response code is greater than or equal to 400.

maxtime

CountStatistic

Maximum amount of time the web container waits for requests.

processingtime

CountStatistic

Cumulative value of the amount of time required to process each request. The processing time is the average of request processing times divided by the request count.

requestcount

CountStatistic

The total number of requests processed so far.

servicetime

CountStatistic

Aggregate response time in milliseconds.

Web JSP Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for web JSP statistics:

server.applications.web-module.virtual-server.statistic
server.applications.application.web-module.virtual-server.statistic

The available web JSP statistics are shown in the following table.

Table 8-35 Web JSP Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

jspcount-current

RangeStatistic

Number of active JSP pages

jsperrorcount

CountStatistic

Total number of errors triggered by JSP page invocations

jspreloadedcount

CountStatistic

Total number of JSP pages that were reloaded

totaljspcount

CountStatistic

Total number of JSP pages ever loaded

Web Request Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for web request statistics:

server.applications.web-module.virtual-server.statistic
server.applications.application.web-module.virtual-server.statistic

The available web request statistics are shown in the following table.

Table 8-36 Web Request Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

errorcount

CountStatistic

Cumulative value of the error count, with error count representing the number of cases where the response code was greater than or equal to 400

maxtime

CountStatistic

Longest response time for a request; not a cumulative value, but the largest response time from among the response times

processingtime

CountStatistic

Average request processing time, in milliseconds

requestcount

CountStatistic

Cumulative number of the requests processed so far

Web Servlet Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for web servlet statistics:

server.applications.web-module.virtual-server.statistic
server.applications.application.web-module.virtual-server.statistic

The available web servlet statistics are shown in the following table.

Table 8-37 Web Servlet Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

activeservletsloadedcount

RangeStatistic

Number of currently loaded servlets

servletprocessingtimes

CountStatistic

Cumulative servlet processing times , in milliseconds

totalservletsloadedcount

CountStatistic

Cumulative number of servlets that have been loaded into the web module

Web Session Statistics

Use the following dotted name pattern for web session statistics:

server.applications.web-module.virtual-server.statistic
server.applications.application.web-module.virtual-server.statistic

The available web session statistics are shown in the following table.

Table 8-38 Web Session Monitoring Statistics

Statistic Data Type Description

activatedsessionstotal

CountStatistic

Total number of activated sessions

activesessionscurrent

RangeStatistic

Number of currently active sessions

activesessionshigh

CountStatistic

Maximum number of concurrently active sessions

expiredsessionstotal

CountStatistic

Total number of expired sessions

passivatedsessionstotal

CountStatistic

Total number of passivated sessions

persistedsessionstotal

CountStatistic

Total number of persisted sessions

rejectedsessionstotal

CountStatistic

Total number of rejected sessions

sessionstotal

CountStatistic

Total number of sessions created

Configuring JConsole to View Eclipse GlassFish Monitoring Data

Java SE provides tools to connect to an MBean Server and view the MBeans registered with the server. JConsole is one such popular JMX Connector Client and is available as part of the standard Java SE distribution. When you configure JConsole for use with Eclipse GlassFish, Eclipse GlassFish becomes the JMX Connector’s server end and JConsole becomes the JMX connector’s client end.

To Connect JConsole to Eclipse GlassFish

Java SE 6 enhanced management and monitoring of the virtual machine by including a Platform MBean Server and by including managed beans (MBeans) to configure the virtual machine.

To view all MBeans, Eclipse GlassFish provides a configuration of the standard JMX connector server called System JMX Connector Server. As part of Eclipse GlassFish startup, an instance of this JMX Connector Server is started. Any compliant JMX connector client can connect to the server using the JMX Connector Server.

By default, Eclipse GlassFish is configured with a non-secure System JMX Connector Server. If this is an issue, the JMX connector can be removed. However, access can be restricted to a specific IP address (for example, the loopback address) by setting address to locahost.

  1. Start the domain.

    For instructions, see To Start a Domain.

  2. Start JConsole using this format: JDK_HOME/bin/jconsole

    For example:

    /usr/java/bin/jconsole

    The JConsole Connect to Agent window is displayed.

  3. Click the Remote tab and type the host name and port.

    Always connect remotely with JConsole, otherwise MBeans will not load automatically.

  4. Click Connect.

  5. In the Remote Process text box, specify the JMX Service URL.

    For example:

    service:jmx:rmi:///jndi/rmi://localhost:8686/jmxrmi

    The JMX Service URL is emitted by the server at startup, looking something like this:

    [#|2009-12-03T10:25:17.737-0800|INFO|glassfish7.0|
    x..system.tools.admin.org.glassfish.server|_ThreadID=20;
    _ThreadName=Thread-26;|JMXStartupService: Started JMXConnector, JMXService
    URL = service:jmx:rmi://localhost:8686/jndi/rmi://localhost:8686/jmxrmi|#]

    However, in most cases, simply entering host:port is fine, such as, 192.168.1.150:8686. The long Service URL is not needed.

    Another host name can be substituted for localhost. The default port number (8686) could change if the jmx-connector configuration has been modified.

  6. Click Connect.

    In the JConsole window you will see all your MBeans, JVM information, and so on, in various tabs. Most of the useful MBeans are to be found in the amx and java.lang domains.

See Also

9 Administering Life Cycle Modules

This chapter provides procedures for administering life cycle modules in the Eclipse GlassFish 7 environment.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing the tasks in this chapter by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

About Life Cycle Modules

Life cycle modules, also known as initialization services, provide a means of running short or long duration Java-based tasks within the Eclipse GlassFish environment. These modules are automatically initiated at server startup and are notified at various phases of the server life cycle. Configured properties for a life cycle module are passed as properties during server initialization.

All life cycle module classes and interfaces are in the as-install/modules/glassfish-api.jar file.

A life cycle module listens for and performs its tasks in response to the following Eclipse GlassFish sequence of events:

  1. Initialization. The server reads the configuration, initializes built-in subsystems (such as security and logging services), and creates the containers.

  2. Startup. The server loads and initializes deployed applications.

  3. Ready. The server begins servicing requests.

  4. Shutdown. The server shuts down the applications and stops.

  5. Termination. The server closes the containers, the built-in subsystems, and the server runtime environment.

These events are defined in the LifecycleEvent class. For information on creating life cycle modules, see "Developing Lifecycle Listeners" in Eclipse GlassFish Application Development Guide.

If the is-failure-fatal setting is set to true (the default is false), life cycle module failure prevents server initialization or startup, but not shutdown or termination.

Configuring Life Cycle Modules

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create a Life Cycle Module

Use the create-lifecycle-module subcommand in remote mode to create a life cycle module.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create a new life cycle modules by using the create-lifecycle-module subcommand.

    Information about options and properties for the subcommand are included in this help page.

  3. Restart the server for your changes to take effect.

Example 9-1 Creating a Life Cycle Module

This example creates the customSetup life cycle module :

asadmin> create-lifecycle-module --classname "com.acme.CustomSetup"
--classpath "/export/customSetup" --loadorder 1 --failurefatal=true
--description "this is a sample customSetup"
--property rmi="Server\=acme1\:7070":timeout=30 customSetup
Command create-lifecycle-module executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-lifecycle-module at the command line.

To List Life Cycle Modules

Use the list-lifecycle-modules subcommand in remote mode to list the existing life cycle modules.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List life cycle modules by using the list-lifecycle-modules subcommand.

Example 9-2 Listing Life Cycle Modules

This example lists the existing life cycle modules.

asadmin> list-lifecycle-modules
WSTCPConnectorLCModule
Command list-lifecycle-modules executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-lifecycle-modules at the command line.

To Update a Life Cycle Module

Use the set subcommand to update an existing life cycle module.

  1. List the properties that can be updated for a life cycle module by using the get subcommand.

    For example (single mode):

    asadmin get "*" | grep sampleLCM
    applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.availability-enabled=false
    applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.directory-deployed=false
    applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.enabled=true
    applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.name=sampleLCMmodule
    applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.object-type=user
    applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.property.class-name=example.lc.SampleModule
    applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.property.classpath=/build/lcm.jar
    applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.property.is-failure-fatal=false
    applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.property.isLifecycle=true
  2. Update a life cycle module by using the oset subcommand.

  3. Restart the server for your changes to take effect.

Example 9-3 Updating a Life Cycle Module

This example updates the classpath property.

sadmin> set applications.application.sampleLCMmodule.
property.classpath=/build/lcm_new.jarapplications.application.
sampleLCMmodule.property.classpath=/build/lcm_new.jar
Command set executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set at the command line.

To Delete a Life Cycle Module

Use the delete-lifecycle-module subcommand in remote mode to delete a life cycle module.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the current life cycle modules by using the list-lifecycle-modules subcommand.

  3. Delete a life cycle module by using the delete-lifecycle-module subcommand.

Example 9-4 Deleting a Life Cycle Module

This example deletes the customSetup life cycle module.

asadmin> delete-lifecycle-module customSetup
Command delete-lifecycle-module executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-lifecycle-module at the command line.

10 Administering Batch Jobs

This chapter provides procedures for administering batch jobs in the Eclipse GlassFish environment by using the asadmin command-line utility.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing these tasks by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

About Batch Jobs

Eclipse GlassFish provides a batch runtime for the scheduling and execution of batch jobs. Batch jobs are typically long-running, bulk-oriented tasks that contain a series of steps and can be executed without user interaction. Examples include billing, report generation, data format conversion, and image processing.

Batch applications submit jobs to the batch runtime and provide instructions about how and when to execute the steps. The batch runtime processes the steps as directed by job XML documents packaged with the applications and stores information about jobs in a job repository. In Eclipse GlassFish, the job repository is a database

For detailed information about batch jobs, batch processing, and the batch processing framework, see Batch Processing in The Jakarta EE Tutorial. Also see Java Specification Request 352: Batch Applications for the Java Platform (http://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=352). The specification defines the programming model for batch applications and the runtime for scheduling and executing batch jobs.

Viewing Batch Jobs

You can view detailed information about batch jobs, executions, and steps. Users who log in to the asadmin utility or to the Administration Console as administrator are the only users who can view details for all batch jobs submitted by all applications in the Eclipse GlassFish environment.

The following tasks are used to view information about batch jobs:

To List Batch Jobs

Use the list-batch-jobs subcommand in remote mode to list batch jobs and job details.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List batch jobs by using the list-batch-jobs subcommand.

Example 10-1 Listing Batch Jobs

This example lists batch jobs for the default server instance, server. Use list-batch-jobs -l to list additional details.

asadmin> list-batch-jobs
JOBNAME  INSTANCECOUNT
payroll  9
bonus    6
Command list-batch-jobs executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-batch-jobs at the command line.

To List Batch Job Executions

When the batch runtime executes a job, the execution is given a unique execution ID. An execution ID is similar to a process ID. A new execution is created the first time a job is started and every time the existing execution is restarted.

Use the list-batch-job-executions subcommand in remote mode to list batch job executions and execution details.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List batch job executions by using the list-batch-job-executions subcommand.

Example 10-2 Listing Batch Job Executions

This example lists batch job executions for the default server instance, server, and displays specific details. Use list-batch-job-executions -l to list additional details.

asadmin> list-batch-job-executions -o=jobname,executionid,batchstatus,exitstatus
JOBNAME  EXECUTIONID  BATCHSTATUS  EXITSTATUS
payroll  9            COMPLETED    COMPLETED
bonus    6            FAILED       FAILED
Command list-batch-job-executions executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-batch-job-executions at the command line.

To List Batch Job Steps

A batch job consists of one or more steps. A step is an independent and sequential phase of a batch job.

Use the list-batch-job-steps subcommand in remote mode to list steps and step details for a specific batch job execution.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the execution ID of an execution by using the list-batch-job-executions subcommand.

  3. List steps for a specific batch job execution by using the list-batch-job-steps subcommand.

Example 10-3 Listing Batch Job Steps

This example lists batch job steps and specific step details for a job execution with the execution ID of 7. The target is the default server instance, server. Use list-batch-job-steps -l to list additional details.

Some lines of output are omitted from this example for readability.

asadmin> list-batch-job-steps o=stepname,stepid,batchstatus,stepmetrics 7
STEPNAME   STEPID   BATCHSTATUS   STEPMETRICS
prepare    7        COMPLETED     METRICNAME          VALUE
                                  READ_COUNT          8
                                  WRITE_COUNT         8
                                  PROCESS_SKIP_COUNT  0
process    8        COMPLETED     METRICNAME          VALUE
                                  READ_COUNT          8
                                  WRITE_COUNT         8
                                  PROCESS_SKIP_COUNT  0
...
Command list-batch-job-steps executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-batch-job-steps at the command line.

Configuring the Batch Runtime

The batch runtime uses a data source and a managed executor service to execute batch jobs. The data source stores information about current and past jobs, and the managed executor service provides threads to jobs. Batch runtime configuration data is stored in the config element in domain.xml.

Eclipse GlassFish provides a default data source and managed executor service for the execution of batch jobs. For the domain administration server (DAS), the default data source is jdbc/TimerPool and the default managed executor service is concurrent/defaultManagedExecutorService. If you create a standalone server instance or a standalone cluster, the default data source is jdbc/__default. You can configure the batch runtime to use different resources.

For more information about data sources, see Administering Database Connectivity. For more information about managed executor services, see Configuring Managed Executor Services.

The following tasks are used to view and configure the batch runtime:

To List the Batch Runtime Configuration

Use the list-batch-runtime-configuration subcommand in remote mode to display the configuration of the batch runtime.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Display the configuration of the batch runtime by using the list-batch-runtime-configuration subcommand.

  3. If desired, use the get subcommand to view the attributes of the data source and managed executor service resources.

    For example (output omitted):

    asdmin> get resources.jdbc-resource.jdbc/__TimerPool.*
    ...
    asdmin> get resources.managed-executor-service.concurrent/__defaultManagedExecutorService.*
    ...

Example 10-4 Listing the Batch Runtime Configuration

This example lists the configuration of the batch runtime for the default server instance, server.

asadmin> list-batch-runtime-configuration
DATASOURCELOOKUPNAME     EXECUTORSERVICELOOKUPNAME
jdbc/__TimerPool         concurrent/__defaultManagedExecutorService
Command list-batch-runtime-configuration executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-batch-runtime-configuration at the command line.

To Configure the Batch Runtime

Use the set-batch-runtime-configuration subcommand in remote mode to configure the batch runtime.

Do not change the data source after the first batch job has been submitted to the batch runtime for execution. If the data source must be changed, stop and restart the domain and then make the change before any jobs are started or restarted. However, once the data source has been changed, information stored in the previous data source becomes inaccessible.

The managed executor service can be changed after a batch job has been submitted to the batch runtime without affecting execution of the job.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Configure the batch runtime by using the set-batch-runtime-configuration subcommand.

Example 10-5 Configuring the Batch Runtime

This example configures the batch runtime for the default server instance, server, to use an existing managed executor service named concurrent/Executor1.

asadmin> set-batch-runtime-configuration --executorservicelookupname concurrent/Executor1
Command set-batch-runtime-configuration executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help set-batch-runtime-configuration at the command line.

Part II

Resources and Services Administration

11 Administering Database Connectivity

This chapter provides procedures for performing database connectivity tasks in the Eclipse GlassFish 7 environment by using the asadmin command-line utility.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing these tasks by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

About Database Connectivity

A database management system (DBMS) provides facilities for storing, organizing, and retrieving data. The information in databases is often described as persistent data because it is saved on disk and exists after the application process ends. Most business applications store data in relational databases. Applications can access database information by using the Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) API.

The key elements of database connectivity are the following:

  • Database. The repository where data is stored for an enterprise. Java EE applications access relational databases through the JDBC API. For administration procedures, see Setting Up the Database.

  • JDBC Connection Pool. A JDBC connection pool is a group of reusable connections for a particular database. For administration procedures, see Administering JDBC Connection Pools.

  • JDBC Resource. A JDBC resource (data source) provides applications with a means of connecting to a database. To create a JDBC resource, specify the connection pool with which it is associated. Multiple JDBC resources can specify a single connection pool. A JDBC resource is identified by its Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) name. For administration procedures, see Administering JDBC Resources.

  • JDBC Driver. A database driver is a software component that enables a Java application to interact with a database connectivity API . Each database requires its own driver. For administration procedures, see Integrating the JDBC Driver.

At runtime, the following sequence occurs when an application connects to a database:

  1. The application gets the JDBC resource associated with the database by making a call through the JNDI API.

    Using the JNDI name of the resource, the naming and directory service locates the JDBC resource. Each JDBC resource specifies a connection pool.

  2. Using the JDBC resource, the application gets a database connection.

    Eclipse GlassFish retrieves a physical connection from the connection pool that corresponds to the database. The pool defines connection attributes such as the database name (URL), user name, and password.

  3. After the database connection is established, the application can read, modify, and add data to the database.

    The application accesses the database by making calls to the JDBC API. The JDBC driver translates the application’s JDBC calls into the protocol of the database server.

  4. When the application is finished accessing the database, the application closes the connection and returns the connection to the connection pool.

Setting Up the Database

Most applications use relational databases to store, organize, and retrieve data. Applications access relational databases through the Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) API.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Install the Database and Database Driver

  1. Install a supported database product.

    To see the current list of database products supported by Eclipse GlassFish, refer to the Eclipse GlassFish Release Notes.

  2. Install a supported JDBC driver for the database product.

    For a list of drivers supported by Eclipse GlassFish, see Configuration Specifics for JDBC Drivers.

  3. Make the JDBC driver JAR file accessible to the domain administration server (DAS).

  4. Create the database.

    The application provider usually delivers scripts for creating and populating the database.

Next Steps

You are now ready to create a connection pool for the database, and a JDBC resource that points to the connection pool. See To Create a JDBC Connection Pool and To Create a JDBC Resource. The final step is to integrate the JDBC driver into an administrative domain as described in Integrating the JDBC Driver.

To Start the Database

Eclipse GlassFish includes an implementation of the Apache Derby database, however, you can use any JDBC-compliant database. The database is not started automatically when you start Eclipse GlassFish, so if you have applications that require a database, you need to start Apache Derby database manually by using the local start-database subcommand.

Start the database by using the start-database subcommand.

When the database server starts, or a client connects to it successfully, the following files are created at the location that is specified by the --dbhome option:

  • The derby.log file contains the database server process log along with its standard output and standard error information.

  • The database files contain your schema (for example, database tables).

Example 11-1 Starting a Database

This example starts the Apache Derby database on the host host1 and port 5001. [source]

asadmin> start-database --dbhost host1 --dbport 5001 --terse=true
Starting database in the background.
Log redirected to /opt/SUNWappserver/databases/javadb.log.
Command start-database executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help start-database at the command line.

To Stop the Database

Use the local stop-database subcommand to stop the Apache Derby database on a specified port. A single host can have multiple database server processes running on different ports.

  1. If necessary, notify users that the database is being stopped.

  2. Stop the database by using the stop-database subcommand.

Example 11-2 Stopping a Database

This example stops the Apache Derby database on port 5001 of localhost.

asadmin> stop-database --dbhost=localhost --dbport=5001
onnection obtained for host: localhost, port number 5001.
Apache Derby Network Server - 10.2.2.1 - (538595) shutdown
at 2008-10-17 23:34:2 7.218 GMT
Command stop-database executed successfully.

Troubleshooting

For a laptop that roams between networks, you might have trouble shutting down the database. If you start the Apache Derby database and then change your IP address, you will not be able to stop the Apache Derby database unless you add a specific --dbhost argument. For example, if you run asadmin start-database dbhost = 0.0.0.0, and then disconnect Ethernet and switch to wifi, you should run a command similar to the following to stop the database:

asadmin stop-database dbhost localhost

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help stop-database at the command line.

Apache Derby Database Utility Scripts

The Apache Derby database configuration that is available for use with Eclipse GlassFish includes scripts that can help you use the Apache Derby database. The following scripts are available in the as-install/javadb/bin directory:

startNetworkServer,startNetworkServer.bat

Script to start the network server

stopNetworkServer,stopNetworkServer.bat

Script to stop the network server

ij,ij.bat

Interactive JDBC scripting tool

dblook,dblook.bat

Script to view all or part of the DDL for a database

sysinfo, sysinfo.bat

Script to display versioning information about the Apache Derby database environment

NetworkServerControl,NetworkServerControl.bat

Script to execute commands on the NetworkServerControl API

To Configure Your Environment to Run the Apache Derby Database Utility Scripts
  1. Ensure that the JAVA_HOME environment variable specifies the directory where the JDK is installed.

  2. Set the JAVADB_HOME environment variable to point to the as-install/javadb directory.

See Also

For more information about these utilities, see the following documentation:

Configuring Access to the Database

After establishing the database, you are ready to set up access for Eclipse GlassFish applications. The high-level steps include creating a JDBC connection pool, creating a JDBC resource for the connection pool, and integrating a JDBC driver into an administrative domain.

Instructions for performing these steps are contained in the following sections:

Administering JDBC Connection Pools

A JDBC connection pool is a group of reusable connections for a particular database. Because creating each new physical connection is time consuming, Eclipse GlassFish maintains a pool of available connections. When an application requests a connection, it obtains one from the pool. When an application closes a connection, the connection is returned to the pool. JDBC connection pools can be globally accessible or be scoped to an enterprise application, web module, EJB module, connector module or application client module, as described in "Application-Scoped Resources" in Eclipse GlassFish Application Deployment Guide.

A JDBC resource is created by specifying the connection pool with which the resource is associated. Multiple JDBC resources can specify a single connection pool. The properties of connection pools can vary with different database vendors. Some common properties are the database name (URL), the user name, and the password.

The following tasks and information are used to administer JDBC connection pools:

To Create a JDBC Connection Pool

Use the create-jdbc-connection-pool subcommand in remote mode to register a new JDBC connection pool with the specified JDBC connection pool name. A JDBC connection pool or a connector connection pool can be created with authentication. You can either use a subcommand option to specify user, password, or other connection information using the asadmin utility, or specify the connection information in the XML descriptor file.

One connection pool is needed for each database, possibly more depending on the application. When you are building the connection pool, certain data specific to the JDBC driver and the database vendor is required. You can find some of the following specifics in Configuration Specifics for JDBC Drivers:

  • Database vendor name

  • Resource type, such as javax.sql.DataSource (local transactions only) javax.sql.XADataSource (global transactions)

  • Data source class name

  • Required properties, such as the database name (URL), user name, and password

Creating a JDBC connection pool is a dynamic event and does not require server restart. However, there are some parameters that do require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart.

Before You Begin

Before creating the connection pool, you must first install and integrate the database and its associated JDBC driver. For instructions, see Setting Up the Database.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create the JDBC connection pool by using the create-jdbc-connection-pool subcommand.

  3. If needed, restart the server.

    Some parameters require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart.

Example 11-3 Creating a JDBC Connection Pool

This example creates a JDBC connection pool named sample_derby_pool on localhost.

asadmin> create-jdbc-connection-pool
--datasourceclassname org.apache.derby.jdbc.ClientDataSource
--restype javax.sql.XADataSource
--property portNumber=1527:password=APP:user=APP:serverName=
localhost:databaseName=sun-appserv-samples:connectionAttribut
es=\;create\\=true sample_derby_pool
Command create-jdbc-connection-pool executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-jdbc-connection-pool at the command line.

To List JDBC Connection Pools

Use the list-jdbc-connection-pools subcommand in remote mode to list all existing JDBC connection pools.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the JDBC connection pools by using the list-jdbc-connection-pools subcommand.

Example 11-4 Listing JDBC Connection Pools

This example lists the JDBC connection pools that are on localhost.

asadmin> list-jdbc-connection-pools
sample_derby_pool2
poolA
__TimerPool
DerbyPool
sample_derby_pool
Command list-jdbc-connection-pools executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-jdbc-connection-pools at the command line.

To Contact (Ping) a Connection Pool

Use the ping-connection-pool subcommand in remote mode to test if a connection pool is usable. For example, if you create a new JDBC connection pool for an application that is expected to be deployed later, you can test the JDBC pool with this subcommand before the application is deployed. Running a ping will force the creation of the pool if it hasn’t already been created.

Before You Begin

Before you can contact a connection pool, the connection pool must be created with authentication, and the server or database must be running.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Ping a connection pool by using the ping-connection-pool subcommand.

Example 11-5 Contacting a Connection Pool

This example tests to see if the DerbyPool connection pool is usable.

asadmin> ping-connection-pool DerbyPool
Command ping-connection-pool executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help ping-connection-pool at the command line.

You can also specify that a JDBC connection pool is automatically tested when created or reconfigured by setting its --ping option to true (the default is false). See To Create a JDBC Connection Pool or To Update a JDBC Connection Pool.

To Reset (Flush) a Connection Pool

Use the flush-connection-pool in remote mode to reinitialize all connections established in the specified connection pool without the need for reconfiguring the pool. Connection pool reconfiguration can result in application redeployment, which is a time-consuming operation. The JDBC connection pool or connector connection pool is reset to its initial state. Any existing live connections are destroyed, which means that the transactions associated with these connections are lost and must be retried. The subcommand then recreates the initial connections for the pool, and restores the pool to its steady pool size.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Reset a connection pool by using theoflush-connection-pool subcommand.

Example 11-6 Resetting (Flushing) a Connection Pool

This example resets the JDBC connection pool named __TimerPool to its steady pool size.

asadmin> flush-connection-pool __TimerPool
Command flush-connection-pool executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help flush-connection-pool at the command line.

To Update a JDBC Connection Pool

You can change all of the settings for an existing pool except its name. Use the get and set subcommands to view and change the values of the JDBC connection pool properties.

  1. List the JDBC connection pools by using the list-jdbc-connection-pools subcommand.

  2. View the attributes of the JDBC connection pool by using the get subcommand.

    For example:

    asadmin get resources.jdbc-connection-pool.DerbyPool.property
  3. Set the attribute of the JDBC connection pool by using the set subcommand.

    For example:

    asadmin set resources.jdbc-connection-pool.DerbyPool.steady-pool-size=9
  4. If needed, restart the server.

    Some parameters require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart.

See Also

For information about how to tune a connection pool, see the Eclipse GlassFish Performance Tuning Guide.

To Delete a JDBC Connection Pool

Use the delete-jdbc-connection-pool subcommand in remote mode to delete an existing JDBC connection pool. Deleting a JDBC connection pool is a dynamic event and does not require server restart.

Before You Begin

Before deleting a JDBC connection pool, all associations to the resource must be removed.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the JDBC connection pools by using the list-jdbc-connection-pools subcommand.

  3. If necessary, notify users that the JDBC connection pool is being deleted.

  4. Delete the connection pool by using the delete-jdbc-connection-pool subcommand.

Example 11-7 Deleting a JDBC Connection Pool

This example deletes the JDBC connection pool named DerbyPool.

asadmin> delete-jdbc-connection-pool jdbc/DerbyPool
Command delete-jdbc-connection-pool executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-jdbc-connection-pool at the command line.

Configuring Specific JDBC Connection Pool Features

In Eclipse GlassFish, JDBC Connection Pools support a variety of features to simplify administration, monitoring and performance tuning. The following topics address several of these features:

Transparent Pool Reconfiguration

When the properties or attributes of a JDBC connection pool are changed, the connection pool is destroyed and re-created. Normally, applications using the connection pool must be redeployed as a consequence. This restriction can be avoided by enabling transparent JDBC connection pool reconfiguration. When this feature is enabled, applications do not need to be redeployed. Instead, requests for new connections are blocked until the reconfiguration operation completes. Connection requests from any in-flight transactions are served using the old pool configuration so as to complete the transaction. Then, connections are created using the pool’s new configuration, and any blocked connection requests are served with connections from the re-created pool.

To enable transparent JDBC connection pool reconfiguration, set the dynamic-reconfiguration-wait-timeout-in-seconds property of the JDBC connection pool to a positive, nonzero value in one of the following ways:

  • Add it as a property in the Edit JDBC Connection Pool Properties page in the Administration Console. For more information, click the Help button in the Administration Console.

  • Specify it using the --property option in the create-jdbc-connection-pool subcommand. For more information, see create-jdbc-connection-pool(1).

  • Set it using the set subcommand. For example:

    asadmin set resources.jdbc-connection-pool.pool-name.property.dynamic-reconfiguration-wait-timeout-in-seconds=15

This property specifies the time in seconds to wait for in-use connections to close and in-flight transactions to complete. Any connections in use or transaction in flight past this time must be retried.

Using an Initialization Statement

You can specify a statement that executes each time a physical connection to the database is created (not reused) from a JDBC connection pool. This is useful for setting request or session specific properties and is suited for homogeneous requests in a single application. Set the Init SQL attribute of the JDBC connection pool to the SQL string to be executed in one of the following ways:

  • Enter an Init SQL value in the Edit Connection Pool Advanced Attributes page in the Administration Console. For more information, click the Help button in the Administration Console.

  • Specify the --initsql option in the asadmin create-jdbc-connection-pool command. For more information, see create-jdbc-connection-pool(1).

  • Specify the init-sql option in the asadmin set command. For example:

    asadmin set domain1.resources.jdbc-connection-pool.DerbyPool.init-sql="sql-string"
Setting a Statement Timeout

An abnormally long running JDBC query executed by an application may leave it in a hanging state unless a timeout is explicitly set on the statement. Setting a statement timeout guarantees that all queries automatically time out if not completed within the specified period. When statements are created, the queryTimeout is set according to the statement timeout setting. This works only when the underlying JDBC driver supports queryTimeout for Statement, PreparedStatement, CallableStatement, and ResultSet.

You can specify a statement timeout in the following ways:

  • Enter a Statement Timeout value in the Edit Connection Pool Advanced Attributes page in the Administration Console. For more information, click the Help button in the Administration Console.

  • Specify the --statementtimeout option in the asadmin create-jdbc-connection-pool command. For more information, see create-jdbc-connection-pool(1).

Statement Leak Detection and Leaked Statement Reclamation

If statements are not closed by an application after use, it is possible for the application to run out of cursors. Enabling statement leak detection causes statements to be considered as leaked if they are not closed within a specified period. Additionally, leaked statements can reclaimed automatically.

To enable statement leak detection, set Statement Leak Timeout In Seconds for the JDBC connection pool to a positive, nonzero value in one of the following ways:

  • Specify the --statementleaktimeout option in the create-jdbc-connection-pool subcommand. For more information, see create-jdbc-connection-pool(1).

  • Specify the statement-leak-timeout-in-seconds option in the set subcommand. For example:

    asadmin set resources.jdbc-connection-pool.pool-name.statement-leak-timeout-in-seconds=300

When selecting a value for Statement Leak Timeout In Seconds, make sure that:

  • It is less than the Connection Leak Timeout; otherwise, the connection could be closed before the statement leak is recognized.

  • It is greater than the Statement Timeout; otherwise, a long running query could be mistaken as a statement leak.

After enabling statement leak detection, enable leaked statement reclamation by setting Reclaim Leaked Statements for the JDBC connection pool to a true value in one of the following ways:

  • Specify the --statementleakreclaim=true option in the create-jdbc-connection-pool subcommand. For more information, see create-jdbc-connection-pool(1).

  • Specify the statement-leak-reclaim option in the set subcommand. For example:

    asadmin set resources.jdbc-connection-pool.pool-name.statement-leak-reclaim=true
Statement Caching

Statement caching stores statements, prepared statements, and callable statements that are executed repeatedly by applications in a cache, thereby improving performance. Instead of the statement being prepared each time, the cache is searched for a match. The overhead of parsing and creating new statements each time is eliminated.

Statement caching is usually a feature of the JDBC driver. The Eclipse GlassFish provides caching for drivers that do not support caching. To enable this feature, set the Statement Cache Size for the JDBC connection pool in one of the following ways:

  • Enter a Statement Cache Size value in the Edit Connection Pool Advanced Attributes page in the Administration Console. For more information, click the Help button in the Administration Console.

  • Specify the --statementcachesize option in the asadmin create-jdbc-connection-pool command. For more information, see create-jdbc-connection-pool(1).

  • Specify the statement-cache-size option in the asadmin set command. For example:

    asadmin set domain1.resources.jdbc-connection-pool.DerbyPool.statement-cache-size=10

By default, this attribute is set to zero and the statement caching is turned off. To enable statement caching, you can set any positive nonzero value. The built-in cache eviction strategy is LRU-based (Least Recently Used). When a connection pool is flushed, the connections in the statement cache are recreated.

Statement Tracing

You can trace the SQL statements executed by applications that use a JDBC connection pool. Set the SQL Trace Listeners attribute to a comma-separated list of trace listener implementation classes in one of the following ways:

  • Enter an SQL Trace Listeners value in the Edit Connection Pool Advanced Attributes page in the Administration Console. For more information, click the Help button in the Administration Console.

  • Specify the --sqltracelisteners option in the asadmin create-jdbc-connection-pool command. For more information, see create-jdbc-connection-pool(1).

  • Specify the sql-trace-listeners option in the asadmin set command. For example:

    asadmin set domain1.resources.jdbc-connection-pool.DerbyPool.sql-trace-listeners=listeners

The Eclipse GlassFish provides a public interface, org.glassfish.api.jdbc.SQLTraceListener , that implements a means of recording SQLTraceRecord objects. To make custom implementations of this interface available to the Eclipse GlassFish, place the implementation classes in as-install/lib.

The Eclipse GlassFish provides an SQL tracing logger to log the SQL operations in the form of SQLTraceRecord objects in the server.log file. The module name under which the SQL operation is logged is jakarta.enterprise.resource.sqltrace. SQL traces are logged as FINE messages along with the module name to enable easy filtering of the SQL logs. A sample SQL trace record looks like this:

[#|2009-11-27T15:46:52.202+0530|FINE|glassfish7.0|jakarta.enterprise.resource.sqltrace.com.sun.gjc.util
|_ThreadID=29;_ThreadName=Thread-1;ClassName=com.sun.gjc.util.SQLTraceLogger;MethodName=sqlTrace;
|ThreadID=77 | ThreadName=p: thread-pool-1; w: 6 | TimeStamp=1259317012202
| ClassName=com.sun.gjc.spi.jdbc40.PreparedStatementWrapper40 | MethodName=executeUpdate
| arg[0]=insert into table1(colName) values(100) | arg[1]=columnNames | |#]

This trace shows that an executeUpdate(String sql, String columnNames) operation is being done.

When SQL statement tracing is enabled and JDBC connection pool monitoring is enabled, Eclipse GlassFish maintains a tracing cache of recent queries and their frequency of use. The following JDBC connection pool properties can be configured to control this cache and the monitoring statistics available from it:

time-to-keep-queries-in-minutes

Specifies how long in minutes to keep a query in the tracing cache, tracking its frequency of use. The default value is 5 minutes.

number-of-top-queries-to-report

Specifies how many of the most used queries, in frequency order, are listed the monitoring report. The default value is 10 queries.

Set these parameters in one of the following ways:

  • Add them as properties in the Edit JDBC Connection Pool Properties page in the Administration Console. For more information, click the Help button in the Administration Console.

  • Specify them using the --property option in the create-jdbc-connection-pool subcommand. For more information, see create-jdbc-connection-pool(1).

  • Set them using the set subcommand. For example:

    asadmin set resources.jdbc-connection-pool.pool-name.property.time-to-keep-queries-in-minutes=10

Administering JDBC Resources

A JDBC resource, also known as a data source, provides an application with a means of connecting to a database. Typically, you create a JDBC resource for each database that is accessed by the applications deployed in a domain. Multiple JDBC resources can be specified for a database. JDBC resources can be globally accessible or be scoped to an enterprise application, web module, EJB module, connector module or application client module, as described in "Application-Scoped Resources" in Eclipse GlassFish Application Deployment Guide.

A JDBC resource is created by specifying the connection pool with which the resource will be associated . Use a unique Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) name to identify the resource. For example, the JNDI name for the resource of a payroll database might be java:comp/env/jdbc/payrolldb.

The Jakarta EE standard specifies that certain default resources be made available to applications, and defines specific JNDI names for these default resources. Eclipse GlassFish makes these names available through the use of logical JNDI names, which map Jakarta EE standard JNDI names to specific Eclipse GlassFish resources. For JDBC resources, the Jakarta EE standard name java:comp/DefaultDataSource is mapped to the jdbc/__default resource.

The following tasks and information are used to administer JDBC resources:

To Create a JDBC Resource

Use the create-jdbc-resource subcommand in remote mode to create a JDBC resource. Creating a JDBC resource is a dynamic event and does not require server restart.

Because all JNDI names are in the java:comp/env subcontext, when specifying the JNDI name of a JDBC resource in the Administration Console, use only the jdbc/`name format. For example, a payroll database might be specified as `jdbc/payrolldb.

Before You Begin

Before creating a JDBC resource, you must first create a JDBC connection pool. For instructions, see To Create a JDBC Connection Pool.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create a JDBC resource by using the create-jdbc-resource subcommand.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. If necessary, notify users that the new resource has been created.

Example 11-8 Creating a JDBC Resource

This example creates a JDBC resource named DerbyPool.

asadmin> create-jdbc-resource --connectionpoolid DerbyPool jdbc/DerbyPool
Command create-jdbc-resource executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-jdbc-resource at the command line.

To List JDBC Resources

Use the list-jdbc-resources subcommand in remote mode to list the existing JDBC resources.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List JDBC resources by using the list-jdbc-resources subcommand.

Example 11-9 Listing JDBC Resources

This example lists JDBC resources for localhost.

asadmin> list-jdbc-resources
jdbc/__TimerPool
jdbc/DerbyPool
jdbc/__default
jdbc1
Command list-jdbc-resources executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-jdbc-resources at the command line.

To Update a JDBC Resource

You can enable or disable a JDBC resource by using the set subcommand. The JDBC resource is identified by its dotted name.

  1. List JDBC resources by using the list-jdbc-resources subcommand.

  2. Modify the values for the specified JDBC resource by using the set subcommand.

    For example:

Example 11-10 Updating a JDBC Resource

This example changes the res1 enabled setting to false.

asadmin>set resources.jdbc-resource.res1.enabled=false
To Delete a JDBC Resource

Use the delete-jdbc-resource subcommand in remote mode to delete an existing JDBC resource. Deleting a JDBC resource is a dynamic event and does not require server restart.

Before You Begin

Before deleting a JDBC resource, all associations with this resource must be removed.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List JDBC resources by using the list-jdbc-resources subcommand.

  3. If necessary, notify users that the JDBC resource is being deleted.

  4. Delete a JDBC resource by using the delete-jdbc-resource subcommand.

Example 11-11 Deleting a JDBC Resource

This example deletes a JDBC resource named DerbyPool.

asadmin> delete-jdbc-resource jdbc/DerbyPool
Command delete-jdbc-resource executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-jdbc-resource at the command line.

Enabling the jdbc/__default Resource in a Clustered Environment

Eclipse GlassFish 7 includes a preconfigured JDBC resource with the JNDI name jdbc/default. This jdbc/default resource is not enabled by default, so you need to explicitly enable it if you want to use it in a cluster.

To Enable the jdbc/__default Resource for a Clustered Environment

Instructions for creating JDBC resources in general are provided in To Create a JDBC Resource. Use the following procedure to enable the preconfigured jdbc/__default resource for a clustered Eclipse GlassFish environment.

  1. Create the jdbc/__default resource reference for the cluster.

    asadmin create-resource-ref --target cluster-name jdbc/__default
  2. Enable the resource on the DAS that manages the cluster.

    asadmin set resources.jdbc-connection-pool.DerbyPool.property.serverName=DAS-machine-name

    This step is only required if the cluster includes remote instances.

  3. Restart the DAS and the target cluster(s).

    asadmin stop-cluster cluster-name
    asadmin stop-domain domain-name
    asadmin start-domain domain-name
    asadmin start-cluster cluster-name

Integrating the JDBC Driver

To use JDBC features, you must choose a JDBC driver to work with the Eclipse GlassFish, then you must set up the driver. This section covers these topics:

Supported Database Drivers

Supported JDBC drivers are those that have been fully tested by Oracle. For a list of the JDBC drivers currently supported by the Eclipse GlassFish, see the Eclipse GlassFish Release Notes. For configurations of supported and other drivers, see Configuration Specifics for JDBC Drivers.

Because the drivers and databases supported by the Eclipse GlassFish are constantly being updated, and because database vendors continue to upgrade their products, always check with Oracle technical support for the latest database support information.

Making the JDBC Driver JAR Files Accessible

To integrate the JDBC driver into a Eclipse GlassFish domain, copy the JAR files into the domain-dir/lib directory, then restart the server. This makes classes accessible to all applications or modules deployed on servers that share the same configuration. For more information about Eclipse GlassFish class loaders, see "Class Loaders" in Eclipse GlassFish Application Development Guide.

If you are using an Oracle database with EclipseLink extensions, copy the JAR files into the domain-dir/lib/ext directory, then restart the server. For details, see "Oracle Database Enhancements" in Eclipse GlassFish Application Development Guide.

Automatic Detection of Installed Drivers

The Administration Console detects installed JDBC Drivers automatically when you create a JDBC connection pool. To create a JDBC connection pool using the Administration Console, open the Resources component, open the JDBC component, select Connection Pools, and click on the New button. This displays the New JDBC Connection Pool page.

Based on the Resource Type and Database Vendor you select on the New JDBC Connection Pool page, data source or driver implementation class names are listed in the Datasource Classname or Driver Classname field when you click on the Next button. When you choose a specific implementation class name on the next page, additional properties relevant to the installed JDBC driver are displayed in the Additional Properties section.

Configuration Specifics for JDBC Drivers

Eclipse GlassFish is designed to support connectivity to any database management system by using a corresponding JDBC driver. Configuration information is provided for these JDBC drivers:

IBM DB2 Database Type 2 Driver

The JAR files for the DB2 driver are db2jcc.jar, db2jcc_license_cu.jar, and db2java.zip. Set your environment variables . For example:

LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/db2user/sqllib/lib:${Jakarta EE.home}/lib
DB2DIR=/opt/IBM/db2/V8.2
DB2INSTANCE=db2user
INSTHOME=/usr/db2user
VWSPATH=/usr/db2user/sqllib
THREADS_FLAG=native

Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: DB2

  • DataSource Classname: com.ibm.db2.jcc.DB2SimpleDataSource

  • Properties:

    • databaseName - Set as appropriate.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

    • driverType - Set to 2.

    • deferPrepares - Set to false.

IBM DB2 Database Type 4 Driver

The JAR file for the DB2 driver is db2jcc.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: DB2

  • DataSource Classname: com.ibm.db2.jcc.DB2SimpleDataSource

  • Properties:

    • databaseName - Set as appropriate.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

    • driverType - Set to 4.

Apache Derby DB/Derby Type 4 Driver

The Apache Derby DB/Derby JDBC driver is included with Eclipse GlassFish by default, so you do not need to integrate this JDBC driver with Eclipse GlassFish.

The JAR file for the Apache Derby DB driver is derbyclient.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: Apache Derby

  • DataSource Classname: Specify one of the following:

    org.apache.derby.jdbc.ClientDataSource40
    org.apache.derby.jdbc.ClientXADataSource40
  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server if it is different from the default.

    • databaseName - Specify the name of the database.

    • user - Specify the database user.

      This is only necessary if the Apache Derby database is configured to use authentication. The Apache Derby database does not use authentication by default. When the user is provided, it is the name of the schema where the tables reside.

    • password - Specify the database password.

      This is only necessary if the Apache Derby database is configured to use authentication.

MySQL Server Database Type 4 Driver

The JAR file for the MySQL driver is mysql-connector-java-5.1.14-bin.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: MySql

  • DataSource Classname:

    com.mysql.jdbc.jdbc2.optional.MysqlDataSource
    com.mysql.jdbc.jdbc2.optional.MysqlXADataSource
  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • databaseName - Set as appropriate.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

Oracle 10 Database Driver

The JAR file for the Oracle 10 database driver is ojdbc14.jar. Make sure that the shared library is available through LD_LIBRARY_PATH and that the ORACLE_HOME property is set.

To make the Oracle driver behave in a Jakarta EE-compliant manner, you must define the following JVM property:

-Doracle.jdbc.J2EE13Compliant=true

Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: Oracle

  • DataSource Classname: Specify one of the following:

    oracle.jdbc.pool.OracleDataSource
    oracle.jdbc.xa.client.OracleXADataSource
  • Properties:

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

Oracle 11 Database Driver

The JAR file for the Oracle 11 database driver is ojdbc6.jar.

To make the Oracle driver behave in a Jakarta EE-compliant manner, you must define the following JVM property:

-Doracle.jdbc.J2EE13Compliant=true

Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: Oracle

  • DataSource Classname: Specify one of the following:

    oracle.jdbc.pool.OracleDataSource
    oracle.jdbc.xa.client.OracleXADataSource
  • Properties:

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

      For this driver, the XAResource.recover method repeatedly returns the same set of in-doubt Xids regardless of the input flag. According to the XA specifications, the Transaction Manager initially calls this method with TMSTARTSCAN and then with TMNOFLAGS repeatedly until no Xids are returned. The XAResource.commit method also has some issues.

      To disable this Eclipse GlassFish workaround, the oracle-xa-recovery-workaround property value must be set to false.

      Additionally, in order for the transaction manager to recover transactions, the JDBC connection pool’s database user must be given certain Oracle permissions:

      • SELECT permission on DBA_PENDING_TRANSACTIONS, PENDING_TRANS$, DBA_2PC_PENDING and DBA_2PC_NEIGHBORS.

      • EXECUTE permissions on DBMS_XA and DBMS_SYSTEM.

PostgreSQL Type 4 Driver

The JAR file for the PostgreSQL driver is postgresql-9.0-801.jdbc4.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: Postgresql

  • DataSource Classname: org.postgresql.ds.PGSimpleDataSource

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • databaseName - Set as appropriate.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

DataDirect Type 4 Driver for IBM DB2 Database

The JAR file for DataDirect driver is db2.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: DataDirect-DB2

  • DataSource Classname: com.ddtek.jdbcx.db2.DB2DataSource

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • databaseName - Set as appropriate.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

DataDirect Type 4 Driver for IBM Informix

Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: DataDirect-Informix

  • DataSource Classname: Specify one of the following:

    com.informix.jdbcx.IfxDataSource
    com.informix.jdbcx.IfxXADataSource

    DataDirect DataSource Classname: com.ddtek.jdbcx.informix.InformixDataSourcee

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the Informix database server name.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • databaseName - Set as appropriate. This is optional.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

    • IfxIFXHost - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

DataDirect Type 4 Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Database

The JAR file for the DataDirect driver is sqlserver.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: DataDirect-Microsoft SQL Server

  • DataSource Classname: com.ddtek.jdbcx.sqlserver.SQLServerDataSource

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address and the port of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

    • selectMethod - Set to cursor.

DataDirect Type 4 Driver for MySQL Server Database

The JAR file for the DataDirect driver is mysql.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: DataDirect-MySQL

  • DataSource: com.ddtek.jdbcx.mysql.MySQLDataSource

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address and the port of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

    • selectMethod - Set to cursor.

DataDirect Type 4 Driver for Oracle 11 Database

The JAR file for the DataDirect driver is oracle.jar.

To make the Oracle driver behave in a Jakarta EE-compliant manner, you must define the following JVM property:

-Doracle.jdbc.J2EE13Compliant=true

Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: DataDirect-Oracle

  • DataSource Classname: com.ddtek.jdbcx.oracle.OracleDataSource

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

DataDirect Type 4 Driver for Sybase Database

The JAR file for the DataDirect driver is sybase.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: DataDirect-Sybase

  • DataSource Classname: com.ddtek.jdbcx.sybase.SybaseDataSource

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • databaseName - Set as appropriate. This is optional.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

In some situations, using this driver can cause exceptions to be thrown because the driver creates a stored procedure for every parameterized PreparedStatement by default. If this situation arises, add the property PrepareMethod, setting its value to direct.

Inet Oraxo Driver for Oracle Database

The JAR file for the Inet Oracle driver is Oranxo.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: Oracle

  • DataSource Classname: com.inet.ora.OraDataSource

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • user - Specify the database user.

    • password - Specify the database password.

    • serviceName - Specify the URL of the database. The syntax is as follows:

      jdbc:inetora:server:port:dbname

      For example:

      jdbc:inetora:localhost:1521:payrolldb

      In this example,localhost is the name of the host running the Oracle server, 1521 is the Oracle server’s port number, and payrolldb is the SID of the database. For more information about the syntax of the database URL, see the Oracle documentation.

    • streamstolob - If the size of BLOB or CLOB data types exceeds 4 KB and this driver is used for CMP, this property must be set to true.

Inet Merlia Driver for Microsoft SQL Server Database

The JAR file for the Inet Microsoft SQL Server driver is Merlia.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: MicrosoftSqlServer

  • DataSource Classname: com.inet.tds.TdsDataSource

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address and the port of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

Inet Sybelux Driver for Sybase Database

The JAR file for the Inet Sybase driver is Sybelux.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: Sybase

  • DataSource Classname: com.inet.syb.SybDataSource

  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • databaseName - Set as appropriate. Do not specify the complete URL, only the database name.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

JConnect Type 4 Driver for Sybase ASE 12.5 Database

The JAR file for the Sybase driver is jconn4.jar. Configure the connection pool using the following settings:

  • Name: Use this name when you configure the JDBC resource later.

  • Resource Type: Specify the appropriate value.

  • Database Vendor: Sybase

  • DataSource Classname: Specify one of the following:

    com.sybase.jdbc4.jdbc.SybDataSource
    com.sybase.jdbc4.jdbc.SybXADataSource
  • Properties:

    • serverName - Specify the host name or IP address of the database server.

    • portNumber - Specify the port number of the database server.

    • databaseName - Set as appropriate. Do not specify the complete URL, only the database name.

    • user - Set as appropriate.

    • password - Set as appropriate.

    • BE_AS_JDBC_COMPLIANT_AS_POSSIBLE - Set to true.

    • FAKE_METADATA - Set to true.

12 Administering EIS Connectivity

This chapter provides information and procedures for administering connections to enterprise information system (EIS) data in the Eclipse GlassFish 7 environment by using the asadmin command-line utility.

If you installed the Web Profile, connector modules that use only outbound communication features and work-management that does not involve inbound communication features are supported. Other connector features are supported only in the Full Platform Profile.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing the tasks in this chapter by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

For information about database connectivity, see Administering Database Connectivity.

About EIS Connectivity

Enterprise information system (EIS) refers to any system that holds the data of an organization. It can be a mainframe, a messaging system, a database system, or an application. Connection resources are used by applications and modules to access EIS software.)

The key elements of EIS connectivity are the following:

  • Connector Module. A connector module, also called a resource adapter, is a Jakarta EE component that enables applications to interact with EIS software. A connector module is used by Eclipse GlassFish to implement Java Message Service (JMS). Like other Jakarta EE modules, a connector module is installed when it is deployed. For instructions on creating a connector module, see "Developing Connectors" in Eclipse GlassFish Application Development Guide.

  • Connector Connection Pool. A connector connection pool is a group of reusable connections for a particular EIS. A connector connection pool is created when you specify the connector module that is associated with the pool. For administration procedures, see Administering Connector Connection Pools.

  • Connector Resource. A connector resource is a program object that provides an application with a connection to an EIS. A connector resource is created when you specify its JNDI name and its associated connection pool. The JNDI name of a connector resource for an EIS is usually in the `java:comp/env/`eis-specific subcontext. For administration procedures, see Administering Connector Resources.

  • Connector Module Configuration. A connector module configuration is the information that resides in the domain configuration file (domain.xml) for the particular connector module (resource adapter). For administration procedures, see Administering the Resource Adapter Configuration.

  • Connector Security Map. A connector security map associates the caller identity of the application (principal or user group) to a suitable EIS principal or group. For administration procedures, see Administering Connector Security Maps.

  • Connector Work Security Map. A connector work security map associates the caller identity of the work submitted by the connector module (resource adapter) EIS principal or EIS user group to a suitable principal or user group in the Eclipse GlassFish security domain. For administration procedures, see Administering Connector Work Security Maps.

  • Administered Object. An administered object provides specialized functionality for an application, such as providing access to a parser that is specific to the connector module and its associated EIS. For administration procedures, see Administering Administered Objects.

At runtime, the following sequence occurs when an application connects to an EIS:

  1. The application gets the connector resource (data source) associated with the EIS by making a call through the JNDI API.

    Using the JNDI name of the connector resource, the naming and directory service locates the resource. Each EIS resource specifies a connector connection pool.

  2. Using the connector resource, the application gets an EIS connection.

    Eclipse GlassFish retrieves a physical connection from the connection pool that corresponds to the EIS resource. The pool defines connection attributes such as the EIS name, user name, and password.

  3. After the EIS connection is established, the application can read, modify, and add data to the EIS.

    The application accesses the EIS information by making calls to the JMS API.

  4. When the application is finished accessing the EIS, the application closes the connection and returns the connection to the connection pool.

Administering Connector Connection Pools

After a connector module has been deployed, you are ready to create a connector connection pool for it.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create a Connector Connection Pool

Use the create-connector-connection-pool subcommand in remote mode to create a connector connection pool for a deployed connector module. When you are building the connector connection pool, certain data specific to the EIS will be required. The value in the mandatory --connectiondefintion option provides the EIS info.

Multiple connector resources can specify a single connection pool.

Creating a connector connection pool is a dynamic event and does not require server restart. However, there are some parameters that do require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart.

Before You Begin

Before creating the connector connection pool, the connector must be installed.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create the connector connection pool by using the create-connector-connection-pool subcommand.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. If needed, restart the server.

    Some properties require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart. If your server needs to be restarted, see To Restart a Domain.

  4. You can verify that a connection pool is usable by using the ping-connection-pool subcommand.

    For instructions, see To Contact (Ping) a Connection Pool.

Example 12-1 Creating a Connector Connection Pool

This example creates the new jms/qConnPool pool for the jakarta.jms.QueueConnectionFactory connector module.

asadmin> create-connector-connection-pool --steadypoolsize 20 --maxpoolsize 100
--poolresize 2 --maxwait 60000 --raname jmsra --connectiondefinition
jakarta.jms.QueueConnectionFactory jms/qConnPool

Command create-connector-connection-pool executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-connector-connection-pool at the command line.

To List Connector Connection Pools

Use the list-connector-connection-pools subcommand in remote mode to list the pools that have been created.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the connector connection pools by using the list-connector-connection-pools subcommand.

Example 12-2 Listing Connector Connection Pools

This example lists the existing connector connection pools.

asadmin> list-connector-connection-pools
jms/qConnPool
Command list-connector-connection-pools executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-connector-connection-pools at the command line.

To Connect to (Ping) or Reset (Flush) a Connector Connection Pool

Use the ping-connection-pool or flush-connection-pool subcommands in remote mode to perform these tasks on a connection pools. See To Contact (Ping) a Connection Pool or To Reset (Flush) a Connection Pool for instructions.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Connect to or reset a connector connection pool by using the flush-connection-pool subcommand or the ping-connection-pool subcommand.

To Update a Connector Connection Pool

Use the get and set subcommands to view and change the values of the connector connection pool properties.

  1. List the connector connection pools by using the list-connector-connection-pools subcommand.

  2. View the properties of the connector connection pool by using the get subcommand. For example:

    asadmin> get domain.resources.connector-connection-pool.conectionpoolname.*
  3. Set the property of the connector connection pool by using the set subcommand. For example:

    asadmin> set domain.resources.connector-connection-pool
    .conectionpoolname.validate-atmost-once-period-in-seconds=3
  4. If needed, restart the server. Some properties require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart. If your server needs to be restarted, see To Restart a Domain.

To Delete a Connector Connection Pool

Use the delete-connector-connection-pool subcommand in remote mode to remove a connector connection pool.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the connector connection pools by using the list-connector-connection-pools subcommand.

  3. If necessary, notify users that the connector connection pool is being deleted.

  4. Delete the connector connection pool by using the delete-connector-connection-pool subcommand.

Example 12-3 Deleting a Connector Connection Pool

This example deletes the connection pool named jms/qConnPool.

asadmin> delete-connector-connection-pool --cascade=false jms/qConnPool
Command delete-connector-connection-pool executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-connector-connection-pool at the command line.

Administering Connector Resources

A connector resource provides an application or module with the means of connecting to an EIS. Typically, you create a connector resource for each EIS that is accessed by the applications deployed in the domain.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create a Connector Resource

Use the create-connector-resource subcommand in remote mode to register a new connector resource with its JNDI name.

Creating a connector resource is a dynamic event and does not require server restart. However, there are some parameters that do require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart.

Before You Begin

Before creating a connector resource, you must first create a connector connection pool. For instructions, see To Create a Connector Connection Pool.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create the connector resource by using the create-connector-resource subcommand.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. If needed, restart the server.

    Some properties require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart. If your server needs to be restarted, see To Restart a Domain.

Example 12-4 Creating a Connector Resource

This example creates a new resource named jms/qConnFactory for the jms/qConnPool connection pool.

asadmin> create-connector-resource --poolname jms/qConnPool
--description "creating sample connector resource" jms/qConnFactory
Command create-connector-resource executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-connector-resource at the command line.

To List Connector Resources

Use the list-connector-resources subcommand in remote mode to list the connector resources that have been created.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the connector connection pools by using the list-connector-resources subcommand.

Example 12-5 Listing Connector Resources

This example lists the existing connector resources.

asadmin> list-connector-resources
jms/qConnFactory
Command list-connector-resources executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-connector-resources at the command line.

To Update a Connector Resource

Use the get and set subcommands to view and change the values of the connector resource properties.

  1. List the connector connection pools by using the list-connector-resources subcommand.

  2. View the properties of the connector resource by using the get subcommand. For example

    asadmin> get domain.resources.connector-resource.jms/qConnFactory
  3. Set the property of the connector resource by using the set subcommand. For example:

    asadmin> set domain.resources.connector-resource.jms/qConnFactory.enabled=true
  4. If needed, restart the server. Some properties require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart. If your server needs to be restarted, see To Restart a Domain.

To Delete a Connector Resource

Use the delete-connector-resource subcommand in remote mode to remove a connector resource by specifying the JNDI name.

Before You Begin

Before deleting a resource, all associations with the resource must be removed.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the connector connection pools by using the list-connector-resources subcommand.

  3. If necessary, notify users that the connector resource is being deleted.

  4. Delete the connector resource by using the delete-connector-resource subcommand.

Example 12-6 Deleting a Connector Resource

This example deletes the jms/qConnFactory connector resource.

asadmin> delete-connector-resource jms/qConnFactory
Command delete-connector-resources executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-connector-resource at the command line.

Administering the Resource Adapter Configuration

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create Configuration Information for a Resource Adapter

Use the create-resource-adapter-config subcommand in remote mode to create configuration information for a resource adapter, also known as a connector module. You can run the subcommand before deploying a resource adapter, so that the configuration information is available at the time of deployment. The resource adapter configuration can also be created after the resource adapter is deployed. In this situation, the resource adapter is restarted with the new configuration.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create configuration information by using the create-resource-adapter-config subcommand.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

Example 12-7 Creating a Resource Adapter Configuration

This example creates the configuration for resource adapter ra1.

asadmin> create-resource-adapter-config --property foo=bar
--threadpoolid mycustomerthreadpool ra1
Command create-resource-adapter-config executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-resource-adapter-config at the command line.

To List Resource Adapter Configurations

Use the list-resource-adapter-configs subcommand in remote mode to list the configuration information contained in the domain configuration file (domain.xml) for the specified resource adapter (connector module).

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the configurations for a resource adapter by using the list-resource-adapter-configs subcommand.

Example 12-8 Listing Configurations for a Resource Adapter

This example lists all the resource adapter configurations.

asadmin> list-resource-adapter-configs
ra1
ra2
Command list-resource-adapter-configs executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-resource-adapter-configs at the command line.

To Update a Resource Adapter Configuration

Use the get and set subcommands to view and change the values of the resource adapter configuration properties.

  1. List the configurations for a resource adapter by using the list-resource-adapter-configs subcommand.

  2. View the properties of the connector resource by using the get subcommand. For example:

    asadmin>get domain.resources.resource-adapter-config.ra1.*
  3. Set the property of the connector resource by using the set subcommand. For example:

    asadmin> set domain.resources.resource-adapter-config.ra1.raSpecificProperty=value

To Delete a Resource Adapter Configuration

Use the delete-resource-adapter-config subcommand in remote mode to delete the configuration information contained in the domain configuration file (domain.xml) for a specified resource adapter (connector module).

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the configurations for a resource adapter by using the list-resource-adapter-configs subcommand.

  3. Delete the configuration for a resource adapter by using the delete-resource-adapter-config subcommand.

Example 12-9 Deleting a Resource Adapter Configuration

This example deletes the configuration for resource adapter ra1.

asadmin> delete-resource-adapter-config ra1
Command delete-resource-adapter-config executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-resource-adapter-config at the command line.

Administering Connector Security Maps

The EIS is any system that holds the data of an organization. It can be a mainframe, a messaging system, a database system, or an application. The connector security map is used to map the application’s credentials to the EIS credentials.

A security map applies to a particular connector connection pool. One or more named security maps can be associated with a connector connection pool.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create a Connector Security Map

Use the create-connector-security-map subcommand in remote mode to create a security map for the specified connector connection pool. If the security map is not present, a new one is created. You can specify back-end EIS principals or back-end EIS user groups. The connector security map configuration supports the use of the wild card asterisk (*) to indicate all users or all user groups.

You can also use this subcommand to map the caller identity of the application (principal or user group) to a suitable EIS principal in container-managed authentication scenarios.

Before You Begin

For this subcommand to succeed, you must have first created a connector connection pool. For instructions, see To Create a Connector Connection Pool.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create a connector security map by using the create-connector-security-map subcommand.

    Information about the options for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. If needed, restart the server.

    Some properties require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart. If your server needs to be restarted, see To Restart a Domain.

Example 12-10 Creating a Connector Security Map

This example creates a connector security map securityMap1 for connection-pool1.

asadmin> create-connector-security-map --poolname connector-pool1
--principals principal1, principal2 --mappedusername backend-username securityMap1
Command create-connector-security-map executed successfully

To List Connector Security Maps

Use the list-connector-security-maps subcommand in remote mode to list the existing security maps belonging to the specified connector connection pool. You can get a simple listing of the connector security maps for a connector connection pool, or you can get a more comprehensive listing that shows the principals of the map.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List existing connector connection pools by using the list-connector-connection-pools subcommand.

  3. List the security maps for a specific connector connection pool by using the list-connector-security-maps subcommand.

Example 12-11 Listing All Connector Security Maps for a Connector Connection Pool

This example lists the connector security maps associated with connector-Pool1.

asadmin> list-connector-security-maps connector-Pool1
securityMap1
Command list-connector-security-maps executed successfully.

Example 12-12 Listing Principals for a Specific Security Map for a Connector Connection Pool

This example lists the principals associated with securityMap1.

asadmin> list-connector-security-maps --securitymap securityMap1 connector-Pool1
principal1
principal1
Command list-connector-security-maps executed successfully.

Example 12-13 Listing Principals of All Connector Security Maps for a Connector Connection Pool

This example lists the connector security maps associated with connector-Pool1.

asadmin> list-connector-security-maps --verbose connector-Pool1
securityMap1
principal1
principal1
Command list-connector-security-maps executed successfully.

To Update a Connector Security Map

Use the update-connector-security-map subcommand in remote mode to create or modify a security map for the specified connector connection pool.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List existing connector security maps by using the list-connector-security-maps subcommand.

  3. Modify a security map for a specific connector connection pool by using the update-connector-security-map subcommand.

  4. If needed, restart the server.

    Some properties require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart. If your server needs to be restarted, see To Restart a Domain.

Example 12-14 Updating a Connector Security Map

This example adds principals to securityMap1.

asadmin> update-connector-security-map --poolname connector-pool1
--addprincipals principal1, principal2 securityMap1
Command update-connector-security-map executed successfully.

To Delete a Connector Security Map

Use the delete-connector-security-map subcommand in remote mode to delete a security map for the specified connector connection pool.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List existing connector connection pools by using the list-connector-connection-pools subcommand.

  3. Delete a security map for a specific connector connection pool by using the delete-connector-security-map subcommand.

    Information about options for this subcommand is included in this help page.

Example 12-15 Deleting a Connector Security Map

This example deletes securityMap1 from connector-pool1.

asadmin> delete-connector-security-map --poolname connector-pool1 securityMap1

Command delete-connector-security-map executed successfully

Administering Connector Work Security Maps

The EIS is any system that holds the data of an organization. It can be a mainframe, a messaging system, a database system, or an application. The connector work security map is used to is used to map the EIS credentials to the credentials of Eclipse GlassFish security domain.

A security map applies to a particular connector connection pool. One or more named security maps can be associated with a connector connection pool.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create a Connector Work Security Map

Use the create-connector-work-security-map subcommand in remote mode to map the caller identity of the work submitted by the connector module (resource adapter) EIS principal or EIS user group to a suitable principal or user group in the Eclipse GlassFish security domain. One or more work security maps can be associated with a connector module.

The connector security map configuration supports the use of the wild card asterisk (*) to indicate all users or all user groups.

Before You Begin

Before creating a connector work security map, you must first create a connector connection pool. For instructions, see To Create a Connector Connection Pool.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. Create the connector work security map by using the create-connector-work-security-map subcommand.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  3. If needed, restart the server.

    Some properties require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart. If your server needs to be restarted, see To Restart a Domain.

Example 12-16 Creating Connector Work Security Maps

The following examples create workSecurityMap1 and workSecurityMap2 for my-resource-adapter-name.

asadmin> create-connector-work-security-map --raname my-resource-adapter-name
--principalsmap eis-principal-1=server-principal-1,eis-principal-2=server-principal-2,
eis-principal-3=server-principal-1 workSecurityMap1

asadmin> create-connector-work-security-map --raname my-resource-adapter-name
--groupsmap eis-group-1=server-group-1,eis-group-2=server-group-2,
eis-group-3=server-group-1 workSecurityMap2
Command create-connector-work-security-map executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-connector-work-security-map at the command line.

To List Connector Work Security Maps

Use the list-connector-work-security-maps subcommand in remote mode to list the work security maps that belong to a specific connector module.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the connector work security maps by using the list-connector-work-security-maps subcommand.

Example 12-17 Listing the Connector Work Security Maps

This example lists the generic work security maps.

asadmin> list-connector-work-security-maps generic-ra
generic-ra-groups-map: EIS group=eis-group, mapped group=glassfish-group
generic-ra-principals-map: EIS principal=eis-bar, mapped principal=bar
generic-ra-principals-map: EIS principal=eis-foo, mapped principal=foo
Command list-connector-work-security-maps executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-connector-work-security-maps at the command line.

To Update a Connector Work Security Map

Use the update-connector-work-security-map subcommand in remote to modify a work security map that belongs to a specific resource adapter (connector module).

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the connector work security maps by using the list-connector-work-security-maps subcommand.

  3. If necessary, notify users that the connector work security map is being modified.

  4. Update a connector work security map by using the update-connector-work-security-map subcommand.

Example 12-18 Updating a Connector Work Security Map

This example removes a principal from a work security map.

asadmin> update-connector-work-security-map --raname generic-ra
--removeprincipals eis-foo generic-ra-principals-map
Command update-connector-work-security-map executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help update-connector-work-security-map at the command line.

To Delete a Connector Work Security Map

Use the delete-connector-work-security-map subcommand in remote mode to delete a work security map that belongs to a specific connector module (resource adapter).

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the connector work security maps by using the list-connector-work-security-maps subcommand.

  3. Delete a connector work security map by using the delete-connector-work-security-map subcommand.

Example 12-19 Deleting a Connector Work Security Map

This example deletes the worksecuritymap1 map from the my_ra connector module.

asadmin> delete-connector-work-security-map --raname my_ra worksecuritymap1
Command delete-connector-work-security-map executed successfully.

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-connector-work-security-map at the command line.

Administering Administered Objects

Packaged within a connector module, an administered object provides specialized functionality for an application. For example, an administered object might provide access to a parser that is specific to the connector module and its associated EIS.

The following topics are addressed here:

To Create an Administered Object

Use the create-admin-object subcommand to create an administered object resource. When creating an administered object resource, name-value pairs are created, and the object is associated to a JNDI name.

Before You Begin

The resource adapter must be deployed before running this subcommand (jmsrar.rar).

  1. Create an administered object by using the create-admin-object subcommand.

    Information about properties for the subcommand is included in this help page.

  2. If needed, restart the server.

    Some properties require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart. If your server needs to be restarted, see To Restart a Domain.

Example 12-20 Creating an Administered Object

For this example, the jakarta.jms.Queue resource type is obtained from the ra.xml file. The JNDI name of the new administered object is jms/samplequeue.

asadmin> create-admin-object --restype jakarta.jms.Queue --raname jmsra
--description "sample administered object" --property Name=sample_jmsqueue jms/samplequeue
Command create-admin-object executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help create-admin-object at the command line.

To List Administered Objects

Use the list-admin-object subcommand in remote mode to list the existing administered objects.

  1. Ensure that the server is running. Remote subcommands require a running server.

  2. List the administered objects by using the list-admin-objects subcommand.

Example 12-21 Listing Administered Objects

This example lists the existing administered objects.

asadmin> list-admin-objects
jms/samplequeue
Command list-admin-objects executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help list-admin-object at the command line.

To Update an Administered Object

Use the get and set subcommands to view and change the values of the administered objects properties.

  1. List the administered objects by using the list-admin-objects subcommand.

  2. View the properties of the administered object by using the get subcommand. For example:

    asadmin> get domain.resources.admin-object-resource.jms/samplequeue.*
  3. Set the property of the administered object by using the set subcommand. For example:

    asadmin> set domain.resources.admin-object-resource.jms/samplequeue.enabled=false
  4. If needed, restart the server. Some properties require server restart. See Configuration Changes That Require Restart. If your server needs to be restarted, see To Restart a Domain.

To Delete an Administered Object

Use the delete-admin-object subcommand to delete an administered objects.

  1. List the administered objects by using the list-admin-objects subcommand.

  2. If necessary, notify users that the administered object is being deleted.

  3. Delete an administered object by using the delete-admin-object subcommand.

Example 12-22 Deleting an Administered Object

This example deletes the administered object with the JNDI name jms/samplequeue.

asadmin> delete-admin-object jms/samplequeue
Command delete-admin-object executed successfully

See Also

You can also view the full syntax and options of the subcommand by typing asadmin help delete-admin-object at the command line.

13 Administering Internet Connectivity

This chapter provides procedures for performing internet connectivity tasks in the Eclipse GlassFish 7 environment by using the asadmin command-line utility.

The following topics are addressed here:

Instructions for accomplishing the tasks in this chapter by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

About Internet Connectivity

The HTTP service provides functionality for deploying web applications and for making deployed web applications accessible by Internet clients, either in a single application server instance or in a cluster of multiple server instances. HTTP services are provided by two kinds of related objects: listeners and virtual servers.

For more information about clusters, see the Eclipse GlassFish High Availability Administration Guide.

The following topics are addressed here:

About HTTP Network Listeners

An HTTP listener, also known as a network listener, is a listen socket that has an Internet Protocol (IP) address, a port number, a server name, and a default virtual server. Each virtual server provides connections between the server and clients through one or more listeners. Each listener must have a unique combination of port number and IP address. For example, an HTTP listener can listen for a host on all configured IP addresses on a given port by specifying the IP address 0.0.0.0. Alternatively, the listener can specify a unique IP address for each listener while using the same port.

Because an HTTP listener is a combination of IP address and port number, you can have multiple HTTP listeners with the same IP address and different port numbers, or with different IP addresses and the same port number (if your host was configured to respond to these addresses). However, if an HTTP listener uses the 0.0.0.0 IP address, which listens on all IP addresses on a port, you cannot create HTTP listeners for additional IP addresses that listen on the same port for a specific IP address. For example, if an HTTP listener uses 0.0.0.0:8080 (all IP addresses on port 8080), another HTTP listener cannot use 1.2.3.4:8080. The host running the Eclipse GlassFish typically has access to only one IP address. HTTP listeners typically use the 0.0.0.0 IP address and different port numbers, with each port number serving a different purpose. However, if the host does have access to more than one IP address, each address can serve a different purpose.

To access a web application deployed on Eclipse GlassFish, use the URL http://localhost:8080/ (or https://localhost:8081/ for a secure application), along with the context root specified for the web application.

To access the Administration Console, use the URL https://localhost:4848/ or http://localhost:4848/asadmin/ (console default context root).

About Virtual Servers

A virtual server, sometimes called a virtual host, is an object that allows the same physical server to host multiple Internet domain names. All virtual servers hosted on the same physical server share the IP address of that physical server. A virtual server associates a domain name for a server (such as www.aaa.com) with the particular server on which Eclipse GlassFish is running. Each virtual server must be registered with the DNS server for your network.

Do not confuse an Internet domain with the administrative domain of Eclipse GlassFish.

For example, assume that you want to host the following domains on your physical server: www.aaa.com, www.bbb.com, and www.ccc.com. Assume